Skip to main content

Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

See other formats


IN MEMORIAM 



LLOYD C. BENDER, III 
JOSEPH M. CALVERT 
MIRIAM H. COLUCCI 

JOAN CONNELLY 
JOSEPH F. COURTNEY 
ANTHONY J. DELUCA 
ERNEST G. DIGREGORIO 
MILDRED A. FISH 

JAMES HAILEY 
ELEANOR D. HOVEY 
MARJORIE C. KENNEDY 
EDNA F. LOWE 
DANIEL MACKAY 
WALTER H. MARFLEET 
LAWRENCE M. MCGRATH 
SHIRLEY A. SHUFELT 
ARTHUR R. SMITH, JR. 
JAMES H. WHITE, JR. 



(front cover) 

On September 24, 2000, the 
Wilmington Middle School was 
dedicated to the citizens of 
Wilmington, Massachusetts as a 
testimony to their commitment to 
excellence in education for the 
youth of Wilmington . 



Table of Contents 



Title 



Page 



Mission Statement 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Administration & Finance Town Clerk , 

Board of Registrars , 

Town Counsel 

Board of Assessors , 

Town Treasurer/Collector 

Town Accountant 

Public Safety Fire Department , 

Police Department , 

Animal Control Officer , 

Facilities & Infrastructure Public Buildings Department , 

Permanent Building Committee , 

Department of Public Works , 

Water and Sewer Department 

Human Services & Consumer Affairs ..Library 

Council for the Arts 

Carter Lecture Fund 

Historical Commission 

Recreation Department 

Elderly Services Department 

Housing Authority 

Disabilities, Commission on , 

Veterans' Services 

Board of Health 

Cable T. V. Advisory Task Force 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Education Wilmington Public Schools , 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Voc . Tech. H. S..., 

Community Development Planning/Conservation Department , 

Housing Partnership , 

Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Middlesex Canal Commission 

Inspector of Buildings 

Board of Appeals 

Town Meetings & Elections Constable 

Presidential Primary - March 7, 2000.... 

Annual Town Election - April 15, 2000... 

Annual Town Meeting - April 22, 2000.... 

State Primary - September 19, 2000 

Presidential Election - November 7, 2000 

Directory of Officials 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 

Officers and Department Heads 

Municipal Services Guide 

Meeting Dates and Times 

Accepted Streets 

Telephone Directory by Department 



1 

2 
4 
8 
9 
10 
15 
16 
17 
38 
41 
46 
46 
47 
49 
53 
56 
61 
63 
63 
65 
68 
71 
71 
72 
73 
77 
78 
79 
104 
111 
117 
117 
118 
119 
121 
122 
130 
130 
132 
133 
161 
164 
167 
168 
172 
173 
178 
179 
186 





The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 

mm # 

"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in 
order to deliver a wide range of municipal services to those who 
live, work or own property within the borders of Wilmington; and 
in order to make this community a good place to live, to work, and 
to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. 

Principles of honesty, fairness, dependability and compassion 
must govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the 
Town. Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of 
boards, committees and commissions are recognized as its most 
important resource and the key to its success in serving the 
people of Wilmington." 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989 




-1- 




Offieiz of thiz 
Board of Sf^l^etmizn 
(975) 658-33U 



To wn of Wilmington 

121 (3l(zn Road 
Wilmington, Mfl 01887-3597 



fax 

ny 



(97S) 655-533^ 
(975) 694-1417 




In the year 2000 the Board of Selectmen ushered in the new millennium with a 
number of long and short-term initiatives that will continue to improve the 
quality of life in Wilmington. 

On September 24, 2000 it was the Board's privilege to host an open house at 
the new Middle School. For the first time, approximately 1,000 parents, 
students, educators, town officials and supporters joined together to 
celebrate the completion of this 148,000 square foot, twenty-first century, 
state-of-the-art learning facility. The school boasts the latest in 
technology, spacious classrooms, a volume packed library, a modern auditorium, 
a college size gymnasium and ancillary field space. The day will long be 
remembered not only as a celebration of the town's success to date but also as 
public demonstration of our community's ongoing commitment to the highest 
quality of education in Wilmington. Town and school officials are to be 
commended for bringing this building to completion on time and on budget. 

Continuing its focus on the children of Wilmington, the town also completed 
its reconstruction of the Shawsheen School soccer fields in time for the fall 
season. In September representatives of the Wilmington Youth Soccer 
Association and of the town held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and play began on 
the new fields. Thanks to the excellent work of the Department of Public 
Works, as well as the cooperation of the parents, coaches and players, the 
Shawsheen School fields rank among the finest recreational playing fields in 
the state. 

The Department of Planning and Conservation concluded yet another very busy 
year. Throughout the year 2000, both the Master Plan Advisory Committee and 
the Open Space Committee worked to complete their missions. With the 
endorsement of the Board of Selectmen and under the direction of the Planning 
and Conservation administration, the Town of Wilmington is well on its way to 
completing an Open Space Plan and updated Master Plan. These plans not only 
represent an important milestone in Wilmington's community development 
planning but also demonstrates the realization of several goals set forth in 
the Growth Planning and Watershed Management Grant obtained by the town in 
1998 . 

Also in the year 2000 the Department of Planning and Conservation, in 
cooperation with the Wilmington Housing Partnership, again implemented a 
federally funded First Time Homebuyer ' s Assistance Program through the North 
Shore HOME Consortium. For the fourth consecutive year this program has 
provided a number of Wilmington families with the much-needed assistance to 
realize their dreams of home ownership. Likewise, the Department of Planning 
and Conservation received funding to continue its highly successful housing 
rehabilitation program. 

With the invaluable assistance of Director of Public Health, Gregory Erickson, 
the Board of Selectmen continued to work cooperatively with the Board of 
Health to identify, assess and respond to a myriad of environmental issues. 
Selectmen continue to monitor the remediation efforts at the Olin 
Corporation's Fames Street site to ensure that the town's water resources are 
not vitally affected. During the year 2000 the Health Department also 
participated in remedial clean-up efforts at the property located off 
MacDonald Road. After reporting the discovery of hazardous waste materials to 
the state Department of Environmental Protection and United States 
Environmental Protection Agency and at the request of the Board of Selectmen, 
the Health Department monitored clean-up efforts and acted as the town's 
liaison with neighbors, state officials and federal agencies. 

-2- 



The fine work of the Health Department has not been limited to reactive 
measures however, the Health Department applied for and received one of only 
11 grants awarded nationwide by the National Association of City and County 
Health Officers. The grant will enable the production of an informational 
package pertaining to the Rocco landfill and MacDonald Road hazardous waste 
sites . 



As in 1997 the 
A. Caira to the 
Throughout Mich 
vastly improved 
stability despi 
costs associate 
projects. The 
leadership, thi 
beyond . 



Board of Selectmen again voted unanimously to reappoint Michael 

position of Town Manager for a term of three years, 
ael Caira 's tenure, the Town of Wilmington has experienced 

financial stability. The town has achieved this financial 
te unprecedented levels of growth, as well as the substantial 
d with a number of infrastructure and capital improvement 
Board believes and expects that under Michael Caira 's 
s success will continue throughout the next three years and 



Just as importantly, 
our town employees, 
Gardner once wrote, 
extraordinary things 
extraordinarily well 
have committed count 
accounts for our rec 
to come. On behalf 
service . 



the Board would like to recognize the tireless efforts of 
volunteers and community service organizations. John 
"Democracy is measured not by its leaders doing 
, but by its citizens doing ordinary things 
. " The extraordinary way in which so many of our citizens 
less hours to improving the quality of life in Wilmington 
ent achievements, and assures us of many successful years 
of the Board of Selectmen, thank you for your dedicated 




Board of Selecimcn. from left: Daniel C. Wandell. Robert J. Cain, Chairman Michael J. Newhouse (sealed), James J. Rooney and 
Michael V. McCoy. 



-3- 



Town of Wilmington 

1 2 1 GLEN ROAD 
WILMINGTON, MA 1 887 



OFFICE OF THE FAX (978) 658-3334 

TOWN MANAGER TTY (978) 694-1417 

(978) 658-3311 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Wilmington: 

It seemed like the year 2000 would never get here. Communities all over the 
world spent months, even years, preparing for the "dreaded" Y2K and the 
technological terror that would usher in the new millennium. The Town of 
Wilmington was among those communities that prepared for the onslaught that 
never came. We welcomed, with relief, a smooth transition into the new year. 
And I believe as a community - we made the best of it. 

lie K/tJUtUtu^ioK 7Hi<UU School a dedicated to tAe ettt^aa TVilmitCftaK, '}KaM<uJuMetti 
eu <t teitiMtowf t» tiein. cttHntUtMit to aceetUtce ut educaXiat ^ tie ifOutA K/iUtuM^toK. 

There is little doubt as to what constituted the community's most significant 
accomplishment during the past year. The Wilmington Middle School opened its 
doors to approximately 930 sixth, seventh and eighth grade students on August 
29, 2000. Wilmington's first new school in 30 years is a three story, 
148,000 square foot state-of-the-art learning facility. The more than one 
thousand residents who attended the "community celebration" of the new school 
on September 24, 2000 had their initial opportunity to tour the building and 
from all indications they were not disappointed. The school, which was built 
on time and under budget , is a result of thousands of hours of careful 
planning and judicious financial management. Ultimate credit, however, is 
reserved for those citizens who worked tirelessly in support of the 1997 debt 
exclusion authorization. 

At year's end the Massachusetts Taxpayers' Foundation reported that municipal 
finances were at their strongest point in more than a decade. They cautioned 
communities, however, that they were likely to enter "a period of transition 
from the phenomenal gains of the last decade to the more measured pace of 
growth that lies ahead." It is important that the town remains conservative 
in the management of its resources and that is why we continue to build upon 
a "balance sheet" that will enable Wilmington to meet important future 
obligations in the event of an economic downturn. 

I am pleased to again report on the town's strong financial condition. Last 
year I reported certified free cash at over $3.6M, an increase of $1.25M over 
the prior year. At year's end free cash had yet to be certified, however we 
estimate it to be nearing $6M. Free cash serves as a community's most 
important reserve. It is a significant measurement of a community's 
financial condition. In June of 2001, the town will issue permanent debt 
consistent with the debt financing plan first put forward in 1997 to fund the 
construction of the Middle School and the Public Safety Building which is 
scheduled to open in the spring of 2001. Rating agencies will assess 
Wilmington's financial condition and establish a bond rating. The town's 
strong free cash position, its operating reserves, its lack of current long- 
term debt and the community's recent history of investing in its future 
should all but guarantee a favorable borrowing rate. 

Several major projects, in addition to the school were completed in 2000. On 
Friday night September 15 under the bright lights at Alumni Field a sellout 
crowd cheered the high school football team on to victory. The first ever 
"night-time home game" was made possible as a result of a positive town 
meeting vote the prior April. Four 70-foot high galvanized steel light 
standards illuminate the field while ancillary lighting was installed to 
properly light the walkways entering the field. In addition to the lights, a 
new press box was constructed above the bleachers. 



Bright skies greeted hundreds of young soccer players eagerly awaiting the 
opportunity to race onto the newly reconstructed Shawsheen School soccer 
fields. The year long project was designed, managed and constructed by the 
Department of Public Works. Nearly nine acres of fields were completely 
resurfaced with topsoil and grass. Drainage and irrigation systems were 
installed, the fields were properly raised to facilitate runoff, a water pump 
shed was constructed and new fencing was installed at the Shawsheen 
recreational courts. 



The town continues to place an emphasis on improving its facilities, its 
infrastructure and its parks and grounds. A new irrigation system was 
installed by DPW personnel on the playing fields of the North Intermediate 
School. Three new playing fields are scheduled to go on line in the spring 
of 2001 at the Carter Lane/Boutwell Street School campus. Field improvements 
were made at the Boutwell School and Rotary Park in anticipation of new 
playgrounds being constructed in the coming year. New park benches have been 
installed at the Wildwood Cemetery and Town Common and a visitors' parking 
area was constructed at Wilmington High School. 

Despite a drastic reduction in state roadway funds, more than 25,000 linear 
feet of pavement was resurfaced on 20 roadways in 2000. Sidewalks were 
constructed on Lake Street from Shawsheen Avenue to Grove Avenue. The Route 
38 sewer project was completed. The Salem Street/Woburn Street intersection 
improvement project received final design approval and construction is 
scheduled for the 2001 construction season. The town commenced a light 
replacement program at its outdoor lighted recreational facilities. The 
program began at the high school courts when 24 fixtures were replaced with 
energy efficient units. Building improvements were made throughout town 
buildings with particular emphasis at the high school. A large section of 
the roof at the Shawsheen Elementary School was replaced. Gymnasium floors 
were refinished at the high school and the North Intermediate School. Public 
Buildings staff are to be commended for the work they performed in relocating 
equipment and supplies throughout the summer to accommodate the School 
Department's grade and space reconfiguration plan. 

Town Meeting adopted separate By-Laws to strengthen licensing regulations for 
automatic amusement devices and to prohibit smoking in Wilmington 
restaurants. The town accepted the recommendation of the Board of Health to 
not order fluoridation of the town's water supply. Voters adopted budget 
measures to implement the second phase of the development of a comprehensive 
geographical information system; to purchase police cruisers and construction 
vehicles; to install a computerized fuel management system and to upgrade the 
town septage facility. 

The new Public Safety Central Dispatch Office was funded and fully staffed in 
the fall. Civilian dispatchers provide around the clock emergency 
communication services for the Police and Fire Departments. The Central 
Dispatch Office, along with the Fire and Police Departments will shift 
operations to the new Public Safety Building, which is in the final stage of 
construction. The new building will serve to enhance the town's efforts to 
promote community-based police and fire services and to modernize and improve 
upon its safety apparatus and equipment. This past year, the Wilmington Sons 
of Italy contributed to that effort through a $33,000 donation enabling the 
Fire Department to purchase two thermal imaging cameras . 

At year's end Wilmington received a Community Development Block Grant of 
approximately $600,000 enabling the town to continue its housing 
rehabilitation program. Since 1992, block grants totaling more than $2.5 
million have been awarded to the town. In September, the town was designated 
by the Commonwealth as "Housing Certified" based upon its efforts to improve 
housing opportunities for families. As a result, the town will receive 
priority for certain discretionary funds made available by the state. 

Environmental issues were at the forefront in 2000. The Board of Health was 
awarded one of only 11 grants in the country by the National Association of 
City and County Health Officers for the purpose of conducting a needs 
assessment and educational outreach program relative to the McDonald Road 
cleanup. The town has been notified that it will receive $100,000 in 



-5- 



Supplemental Environmental Project funds from the owners of the Spinazzola 
landfill. Work has begun at the former landfill site to remove hazardous 
waste and to begin the capping of the landfill. A new program of collecting 
elemental mercury for recycling was established, smoking cessation programs 
were expanded and the town's Title 5 Betterment Loan Program was refunded. 

Homeowners need not be reminded that property values rose significantly in 
2000. The triennial revaluation program was completed by the Board of 
Assessors during the past year. The revaluation demonstrated that Wilmington 
continues to be a strong market for residential properties. Despite the rise 
in property values, residential taxes remain the lowest among area 
communities. Businesses continue to relocate and expand operations in 
Wilmington, many of which are high-tech oriented. 

Future planning has taken much of the town's attention. Attendees at the 
2001 Annual Town Meeting can expect to hear reports from the Master Plan 
Committee and the Open Space and Recreation Committee. A site feasibility 
study for the expansion and/or relocation of the town library is underway. 
The town is moving forward in conjunction with the Department of 
Environmental Protection on producing a town-wide environmental impact 
report. The town, through its Water Department, has petitioned the MWRA for 
permission to obtain an emergency water connection in the event that the town 
is unable to provide the quantity or quality of water necessary to meet town 
needs. Finally, as a result of Town Meeting authorization, the town extended 
by an additional ten years its electric power agreement with the Reading 
Municipal Light Department. 

James Madison wrote, "A popular government without popular information, or 
the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce or a tragedy; or 
perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance. And a people who 
mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which 
knowledge gives." One of the hallmarks of town government over the past 
several years has been its effort to keep residents informed on all aspect of 
town business. The document that you are reading is an important resource 
for new and prospective residents. The town continues to expand its 
information resources. A municipal newsletter has been mailed to every 
property taxpayer four times a year since 1995. Newsletters are produced and 
distributed by the Library, the Elderly Services Department, the Historical 
Commission and the Recreation Department. A town web site, local access 
television and an informational bulletin board at Rotary Park disseminate 
town-wide information. This past year the town unveiled its newest 
informational resource, the Town of Wilmington Calendar. The positive 
response to the calendar was gratefully received and encouragement enough to 
produce a 2001/2002 municipal calendar which will be available in April of 
2001. 

If it seemed like 2000 took forever to get here, the speed in which it "flew 
by" more than made up for its "delayed arrival." The contributions of untold 
residents, businesses, town employees, officials and community organizations 
continue to positively impact upon our community's quality of life. We are 
grateful to those that see the glass "half-full" and work toward "topping it 
off . " 

Several town board members stepped down from their positions in 2000. The 
town acknowledges the past service of Board of Appeals' member Louis Farkas, 
Board of Health member Eugene Kritter, Finance Committee member Ann Yurek, 
Planning Board member Richard Green and Richard Gage of the Commission on 
Disabilities. We also note the passing of Herbert Nickerson, one of the 
town's representatives to the Ipswich River Watershed Association. The town 
government family was saddened by the untimely deaths of two long-time 
employees. Joe Calvert was a 30 year employee of the Public Buildings 
Department who for many years served the Wildwood School as its head 
custodian. Walter Marfleet, a town employee for 28 years, worked for the 
Department of Public Works as the foreman in the cemetery division. Walter 
cared for the cemetery as if it were his own. He and Joe will be missed. It 
is certainly fitting for me to note the passing of former Town Manager Joseph 
Courtney. Joe was Wilmington's second town manager. He was a gifted 



-6- 



intellectual whose creativity and determination paved the way in establishing 
Wilmington's strong industrial base. Joe lived in Wilmington for more than 
40 years after he left its employ and remained an influential figure in town 
government . 

Several municipal employees retired after devoting their professional careers 
to the town. Firefighter Robert Andersen worked 22 years for the town and 
Sergeant William Gable retired from the Police Department following more than 
30 years of service. Earl L'Esperance retired as the Assistant 
Superintendent of Public Buildings having worked 32 years for the town. At 
year's end Harold Gillam retired as Town Engineer and everybody's favorite 
town employee, Marge MacDonald, who worked in the Cemetery and Engineering 
Division of the Department of Public Works, "phased" into a well deserved 
retirement . 

In the year 2000, the town welcomed Anthony Pronski , formerly of the Town of 
Wakefield's Engineering Department, as its new Director of Engineering 
Services. M. Ronald Mendes was appointed Treasurer/Collector after having 
served in a similar position for the Town of Lincoln. In November I 
announced that Deputy Chief Bernard Nally would be appointed Police Chief 
effective January 12, 2001. At the same time I appointed Lieutenant Robert 
Spencer to the position of Deputy Police Chief. Chief Nally has been a 
dedicated officer of the Wilmington Police Department for 32 years. He has 
been the second in command of the department since 1979, first as a 
Lieutenant and then as the Deputy Chief of Police upon that position's 
creation in 1983 . Deputy Spencer began his law enforcement career in the 
City of Woburn in 1969 and joined the Wilmington force in 1973. Appointed a 
Lieutenant in 1993, he headed the department's Criminal Investigation Bureau 
prior to his appointment as Deputy Chief. I am confident that the new 
leadership in the department will continue to demonstrate the innovation and 
compassion that marked the career of retiring Chief Bobby N. Stewart. Chief 
Stewart was originally appointed a police officer in 1970 and became Police 
Chief in 1979. He served the residents of Wilmington with distinction and 
integrity for more than 30 years. His tenure as chief personified public 
service at the highest level. 

Wilmington's future depends on the willingness of its citizens to carry out 
the important issues of the day. Town government will benefit from the 
diversity of opinion that results from citizen involvement. Management guru 
Peter Drucker wrote, "The understanding that underlies the right decision 
grows out of the clash and conflict of opinions and out of the serious 
consideration of competing alternatives." I am privileged to serve the 
citizens of Wilmington and to join with them in striving to reach the right 
decisions for Wilmington's future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael A. Caira 
Town Manager 




Tow n Manager Mic hael A. Caira meets with kindergarten students at the Wildwood Early 
Childhood Center to discuss the Presidential Election. 



-7- 



ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 



The Town Clerk serves as Public Information Officer, Chief Election Officer 
and Local Registrar of Vital Records and Statistics. The Clerk is charged 
with the responsibility of ensuring that the appropriate process, with 
notification and procedure, is adhered to in the making of legislative policy 
and of managing public access to this information. This office is often the 
first door of government accessed by individuals seeking information and the 
resolution of problems. It is with a sense of pride and accomplishment that 
we submit this annual report with the hope that we have served our citizens 
well . 

The following information and vital statistics were recorded during 2000: 

Births 294 

Marriage Intentions 90 

Marriages 87 

Deaths 273 

Deaths - Out of State 11 

Burial Permits 178 

Veterans Buried in Wildwood Cemetery 41 

Flammable Permits and Registrations: 

Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town 
Clerk's office. Notice is sent to the owner or occupant of land where the 
storage is located on or about April 1st for renewal by April 3 0th of each 
year. Failure to register on time, or to comply with the Board's regulations, 
may result in revocation of the permit after a public hearing. Fifty-nine 
flammable permits were issued during the year. 

Permits & Recordings : 

Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 489 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 70 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 197 

Federal Lien Recordings 14 

Federal Lien Releases 20 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 383 

Pole & Conduit Locations 6 

Dog Licenses 1,557 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 4 

The Town Clerk also serves as Clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this 
capacity, she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly 
meeting night, kept the minutes up to date and supervised all elections and 
the annual town census by mail. The Town Clerk's office also maintains 
current voting lists and registers voters during regular office hours. She 
also meets with the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and 
to certify nomination papers for candidates. 

Town Meetings & Elections 2000: 

Presidential Primary March 7 

Annual Town Election April 15 

Annual Town Meeting April 22 

State Primary September 19 

State Election (Presidential) November 7 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts 
of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted 
in the Town Hall. The Board also met many times for certification of 
signatures on nomination papers and assisted at all elections and town 
meetings . 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 51, Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32 and supervised the conduct of 
elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 64, Chapter 53, Sections 43 and 63, 
all in accordance with the Town Charter and By-laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington Revised. 

The calendar year 2000 had a total of 14,676 registered voters from our listed 
21,779 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all citizens of the town who returned 
both their federal and town census forms in 2000. Thanks to you, the 
Massachusetts count for Census 2000 had an increase of 5.5% over the 
population total for 1990. For the first time in three decades, Massachusetts 
did not lose a Congressional seat. A true census is an asset to our town and 
to the entire state. 




Wilmington Town Hall - 121 Glen Road. 



-9- 




I I 

On January 1, 2000, there were pending the following actions by or against the 
town (exclusive of actions in which the town was merely summoned as trustee 
and in which it had no interest and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the 
Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira, et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #78-4771 (action in the nature of certiorari re 
decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka, et al, Middlesex Superior Court 
(complaint alleging violation of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) . 

Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Suffolk Superior Court #54601 
(complaint for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) . 

Ruth E. Marranzini, et al v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
(appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) . 

William Baldwin, ppa, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court 
#85-676 (claim for personal injury) . 

Ralph Fiore Bus Service, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #85-3048 (complaint under Mass. Antitrust Act, G.L. c.93). 

Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court #86-146W 
(claim for violation of civil rights and injunctive relief) . 

James Bruce, Administrator, et al v. Clifford A. Singelais, et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #87-0838 (third party tort action for claim of negligence) . 

Michelle A. Carbone, ppa, et al v. William Clifford, Administrator of the 
Estate of Mary E. Clifford v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G.L. c.22 9, s.2 and third party 
claim G.L. c . 231B) . 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from 
Middlesex Superior Court/appeal from decision of Board of Appeals) . 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from Middlesex 
Superior Court/appeal from decision of Board of Appeals) . 

Richard Stuart, Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington , 
Land Court #42097 (appeal of decisions of Board of Appeals denying 
reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning Official Map (c.41, s.SlE)). 

Scott C. Reinhold v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #91- 
4078 (tort complaint for damages alleging tortuous acts by the Wilmington 
Police Department) . 

Priscilla Collins, Administratrix De Bonis Non of the Estate of Joseph James 
Roy V. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #92-4695 (action for 
personal injury) . 

Presidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning Board , Land 
Court (appeal of a decision of the Planning Board pursuant to G.L. c.41, 
s . 81BB) . 

Mary Nelson v. Louis Farkas, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #94-2516 
(complaint for judicial review of zoning decision) . 

Joanne M. Cuoco, et al v. Gregory Erickson, et al , Woburn District Court 
#945CV1090 (appeal from decision of Board of Health) . 



-10- 




William E. Leatham, III, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex 
Superior Court #95-4539 (complaint in ten counts alleging negligence and other 
matters contained in the complaint) . 

Albert A. Cuoco, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Land Court #226211 
(petition for Declaratory Judgment or to Remove Cloud on Title) . 

Brandon Cave v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #96-5017 (claim 
for personal injury) . 

James Joseph Randall, et al v. Daniel P. Murphy, et al. Land Court #231644 
(claim for declaratory judgment and adjudication of rights concerning so- 
called paper street) . 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr., v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Civil Service 
Commission (claim of appeal pursuant to G.L. c.31, s.41 and claim of appeal 
pursuant to G.L. c.31, s 43). 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court 
No. 99-6090 (Claims for gender discrimination, tortuous interference, 
defamation, sexual harassment and infliction of emotional distress) . 

Lawrence F. Howe v. The Town of Wilmington and Nancy Jane Slater , Land Court 
No. 240631 (Petition for Declaratory Judgment To Remove Cloud on Title) . 

Michael Stuart a/k/a Michael T. Stuart, et al . v. Town of Wilmington , Land 
Court No. 37162-S-1996-11; 3 6146 -S - 1996 - 10 ; 231790 Misc. Case (rights in 
Claremont Street, Wilmington, MA) . 

Christine Bramante and Howard M. Cohen v. Superintendent Geraldine O'Donnell 
and Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #97-5683 (complaint 
concerning bus location) (defense to be provided by School Committee counsel) . 

Priscilla Carciofi v. Town of Wilmington , Lowell District Court #97-llCV-2713 
(complaint concerning money owed to her for being mini -bus driver for the Town 
of Wilmington) (defense to be provided by School Committee counsel and 
insurance company) . 

Pacheco v. Town of Wilmington, et al . (Claim for workman's compensation - 
Town joined as an additional party) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Tighe and Bresnahan, Trustees and North Middlesex 
Savings Bank (Action for Breach of Third Party Agreement for failure to 
complete project improvements) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Middlesex County Retirement Board, et al . , Middlesex 
Superior Court, C.A. #99-5533 (Appeal of decision of Middlesex County 
Retirement Board concerning an employee) . 

James F. Murphy and William T. Murphy v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex 
Superior Court #99-1333 (Land damage and taking of Eminent Domain of land 
located on Wildwood Street) . 

Palmer Sciarappa and Joseph Sciarappa, Sr. v. Town of Wilmington , Essex 
Superior Court #9900730 (Claim for Personal Injury) . 

Craig S. Newh ouse, T rustee of Pulaski Street Realty Trust, et al . v. Town of 
Wilmington , Suffolk Land Court Civil Action No. 254732 (Action in Land Court 
to clarify title to land) . 

Paul Dacko, Cheryl Dacko and Eric E. Murray v. Town of Wilmington , Suffolk 
Land Court Civil Action No. 256091 (Action in Land Court to clarify title to 
land) . 



James Mangano, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington , Land Court Docket No. 257322 
(Petition for declaratory judgment/ remove cloud on Title concerning a parcel 
of land) . 



-11- 




AFSCME, Council 93, AFL-CIO v. Town of Wilmington , Labor Relations Commission 
MUP-2510 (Alleged refusal to bargain in good faith) . 

DeJongh v. AvalonBay Communities, Inc. et al . , Docket #00-1013 (Appeal of 
Zoning Board of Appeals approval of comprehensive permit) . 

************************************ 

♦There are pending as of January 1, 2000, separate petitions for abatements 
before the Appellate Tax Board, many involving claims for several different 
years . 

************************************ 

During the year 2000, the following new actions were brought against the Town 
of Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

AFSCME, Council 93, AFL-CIO v. Town of Wilmington , Labor Relations Commission, 
American Arbitration 00-305-Ns-JG (Alleged refusal to bargain in good faith) . 

Firefighters Local 1370, lAFF v. Town of Wilmington , Labor Relations 
Commission MUP-2604 (Alleged participation in a prohibited practice) . 

DeJongh v. AvalonBay Communities, Inc. et al . , Docket #00-1013 (Appeal of 
Zoning Board of Appeals approval of comprehensive permit) . 

Paula Fiorenza v. The Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington , Misc. Case 
No. 263311 (Appeal of decision in reference to denying the issuance of a 
variance for property) . 

Kevin J. Sullivan and Cynthia A. Sullivan v. Scott Garrant , Kevin Brander, 
James Diorio, Michael Sorrentino and Ann Yurek, as they are members of the 
Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington , Docket No. 2000-4579 (Appeal of 
Planning Board's Definitive Subdivision Plan). 

Lester Chisholm v. Scott Garrant, Kevin Brander, James Diorio, Michael 
Sorrentino and Ann Yurek, as they are the members of the Planning Board for 
the Town of Wilmington , Docket No. Misc. 268-417 (Complaint appealing 
decision of the Planning Board concerning denial of Plaintiff's Form A 
applications seeking endorsement in accordance with G.L. c.41, s.81P) . 

Carolyn J. Reynolds v. Board of Health of the Town of Wilmington , Docket No. 
00E020GC (Equitable Complaint for permission to remove two bodies from 
Wildwood Cemetery) . 

Scott Garrant, James Diorio, Kevin Brander, Michael Sorrentino and Ann Yurek 
as they are members of the Wilmington Planning Board v. Charles E. Boyle, John 
R. Forest, Dan Wandell, Jr. as they are members of the Wilmington Board of 
Appeals and Mark Nelson, individually . Land Court Docket No. 267499 
(Plaintiff's appeal of decision of Board of Appeals pursuant to G.L. c.41, 
S.81BB and G.L. C.40A, s.l7). 

************************************ 

During the year 2000, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf 
of the town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Angelo R. Buonopane , as he is the Commissioner of the 
Department of Labor and Workforce Development and Charles Rooney, Jr ., Docket 
No. 0053CV2886/290963 (Complaint pursuant to G.L. C.151A, s.l2). 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Durand, as he is Secretary of the Office of 
Environmental Affairs , Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No. 00-2885 
(Complaint for review and declaratory judgment concerning sewers) . 



************************************ 



-12- 



During the year 2000, the following actions by or against the town were 
disposed of : 

Porchside Sandwich Company, Inc. v. Charles E. Boyle, Louis Farkas, John 
Forrest, Anita Bachman, Robert Doucette and Philip Fention As They Constitute 
The Board of Appeals Of The Town of Wilmington, And Focaccia Restaurant , 
Middlesex Superior Court #99-1646 (Appeal from Decision of Zoning Board of 
Appeals. Case dismissed by agreement of all parties) . 

Barbara Waring v. Department of Public Works - Town of Wilmington , 
Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination Docket No. 99131791 (Claim of 
discrimination by Department of Public Workers - Town of Wilmington, on the 
basis of sex. Disposed of by finding of no probable cause and dismissal of 
the complaint) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert J. Andersen , Docket #11-3 90-02363-99 
(Claim for disability benefits. Disposed of after trial by decision of 
arbitration denying grievance) . 

David Doucette and Linda Doucette v. Charles E. Boyle, et al . , Middlesex 
Superior Court #97-4669 (Zoning Appeal) (Judgment entered on behalf of 
Defendant affirming the decision of the Board of Appeals and denying 
declaratory relief to the Plaintiffs) . 

Anthony J. Antonowitch v. Gregory Erickson, Director of Health , Summons and 
Order of Notice. Docket No. 2000-04643 (Disposed of after Agreement of 
Judgment signed 10-16-00) . 

State Ethics Commission v. Arthur R. Smith, Jr. , State Ethics Commission No. 
522 (hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation - dismissed by State 
Ethics Commission on October 31, 2000) . 

State Ethics Commission v. James Russo , State Ethics Commission No. 523 
(hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation - dismissed by State Ethics 
Commission on October 31, 2000) . 

Avalon Bay v. The Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington , Docket #00-02 
(Appeal from decision of the Zoning Board of Appeals pending at the Housing 
Appeals Committee. Disposed of by agreement by the parties and withdrawal of 
appeal at the Housing Appeals Committee) . 

Robert McSweeney v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Appeals Court #97-P-57 (action for 
appeal of a decision of the Board of Appeals and claims under Massachusetts 
Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U . S . C . /appealed to the Appeals Court) 
(appeals stayed at the Appeals Court pending Court imposed mediation - 
disposed of by agreement between the parties) . 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO, Local 1703 and Town of Wilmington , American 
Arbitration Association (claim for grievance for Robert Gearty - Denied 
Overtime) ARB#ll-390-02482-98 (Class action Re: Yellow Dress - disposed of 
after trial by Arbitrator and order for payment of overtime) . 

Mark Nelson v. Chief of Police/Town of Wilmington , (Petition for judicial 
review of denial of license to carry firearms - disposed of after trial and 
revocation of license) . 



New England Landevelopment , Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #219125 
(action pursuant to G.L.C.40A, s.l7 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals ' decision) by consolidation with trial and decision of the Land Court 
which is incorporated herein by reference. 

New England Landevelopment, Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #219126 
(action pursuant to G.L. C.40A, s.l7 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) by consolidation with trial and decision of the Land Court 
which is incorporated herein by reference. 

New England Landevelopment, Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #231224 
(action pursuant to G.L. c.41, S.81BB for judicial review of a Planning Board 
decision) by consolidation with trial and decision of the Land Court which is 
incorporated herein by reference . 



-13- 



New England Landevelopment , Inc. v. Board of Appeals, et al . , Land Court 
Department #243915 (complaint for judicial review of decision of the Board of 
Appeals) by consolidation with trial and decision of the Land Court which is 
incorporated herein by reference. 

81 FF Realty Trust v. Town of Wilmington Planning Board and its Director , Land 
Court #236153 (appeal of Planning Board decision) by consolidation with trial 
and decision of the Land Court which is incorporated herein by reference. 

81 FF Realty Trust, Roger Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals and 
Building Inspector , Land Court #237235 (complaint for judicial review of a 
decision of the Board of Appeals and Building Inspector) by consolidation with 
trial and decision of the Land Court which is incorporated herein by 
reference . 

George Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals and Building Inspector , 
Land Court #237236 (complaint for judicial review of a decision of the Board 
of Appeals and Building Inspector) by consolidation with trial and decision of 
the Land Court which is incorporated herein by reference. 

Mary Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals and Building Inspector , 
Land Court #237237 (complaint for judicial review of a decision of the Board 
of Appeals and Building Inspector) disposed of by consolidation with trial and 
decision of the Land Court which is incorporated herein by reference. 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr., v. Town of Wilmington, et al , American Arbitration 
Association (claim for grievance re: suspension) disposed of as withdrawn. 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration 
Association (claim of grievance for Robert Mauriello - overtime pay) disposed 
of by dispute being resolved with assistance of Arbitrator. 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO, Local 1703 and Town of Wilmington , American 
Arbitration Association (claim of grievance for Class Action - sick leave 
bank) disposed of by trial before Arbitrator requiring adherence to 
contractual provisions. 

Colonial Gas Company of Lowell, Middlesex County v. Town of Wilmington, 
Wilmington, MA; Robert P. Palmer of Wilmington, Middlesex County , Middlesex 
Superior Court No. 97-5048 (seeks declaratory and injunctive relief against 
town for street openings) disposed of by decision of Superior Court permitting 
street openings and reasonable repairs. 



-14- 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION 



2001 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriation (Taxation) 


$45, 002, 619 


00 


Total Appropriation (available) 


C O C O Q T 


U U 


iotai uericit 


U 


U (J 


Special Education 


1, 484 


00 


Energy Conservation 





00 


County Retirement Assessment 


1 , 2 7 9, 373 





County Tax 





00 


Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


427 , 311 


00 


Air Pollution Districts 


5,707 


00 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


5 , 154 


00 


Mosquito Control Project 


4 8, 879 


A A 

00 


Amount Certified by Collector & 






Treasurer for Tax Title 


U 


A A 


Overlay of Current Year 


699 , 999 


62 


Cherry Sheet Offsets 


4 6, 342 


00 


w r.T T3 A 


T >i o Q one 


A A 
(J U 


rina.± couirc uiiaynieriL-s 


u 


A A 


D J Oil vi^Vi m -vr^ci 

Ki*iv ou.ircn.a.iry c 


1 ^ Q A n 


A A 
U U 


rii s ce 1 1 aneous 


T n C c; o "7 
iUD , 3Z / 


A A 
U U 


Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 






2001 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 


$7 , 12 5, 134 


A A 




Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


2,243,491 





Penalties and Interest on Taxes 


o r\ r» 

2 0, 000 





faymenL.s m ijieu oi laxes 


1 , u u u 


A A 

u u 


Charges for Services - Sewer 


1, 731, 735 


00 


Other Charges for Services 


180, 000 


00 


Fees 


45,000 


00 


Rentals 





00 


Deferred Teachers Salary 


106, 527 


00 


Departmental Revenue - Library 


10, 000 


00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 


50,000 


00 


Other Department Revenue 





00 


Licenses and Permits 


225, 000 


00 


Special Assessments 


1,000 


00 


Fines and Forfeits 


135, 000 


00 


Investment Income 


500, 000 


00 


Voted from Available Funds 


535, 297 


00 


Free Cash 


500, 000 


00 


Miscellaneous 


145, 848 


00 



$45, 537, 916 . 00 



4, 126, 021.62 
$49, 663, 937 . 62 



$14, 175, 032 . 00 



Real Estate 



Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 



$1,533,651,880.00 @ 12.16 p/t 

$ 105,656,120.00 @ 29.52 p/t 

$ 417,596,800.00 @ 29.52 p/t 

$ 47,157,580.00 ® 29.52 p/t 



$18, 649, 206 . 86 
3, 120, 149.46 
12,327,457.54 
1, 392, 091 .76 

$35,488,905.62 



-15- 



Treasurer/ Collector 



Commitments 

2001 Real Estate $34,096,813.85 

2001 Personal Property 1,392,091.68 

2000 Excise 2,405,763.48 

1999 Excise 168,748.74 

Ambulance 216,777.40 

Apportioned Water Betterments 1,007.74 

Interest 198.10 

Apportioned Street Betterments 1,698.46 

Interest 363.78 

Apportioned Sewer Betterments 25,498.16 

Interest 13,938.93 

Sewer Liens 30,386.00 

Water Liens 120,253.47 

Electric Liens 7,553.67 

Apportioned Title V Betterments 3,922.80 

Interest 979 . 65 

Total $38,485,995.91 

Collections 

Real Estate $33,945,503.38 

Personal Property 1,234,828.50 

Excise 2,541,943.20 

Water Betterments 1,238.84 

Street Betterments 3,800.92 

Sewer Betterments 170,702.94 

Water Liens 112,922.93 

Sewer Liens 31,312.35 

Electric Liens 2,571.21 

Excise Interest and Charges 30,106.52 

Ambulance • 216,777.40 

Lien Certificates 25,525.00 

Betterment Certificates 145.00 

Mark and Clear Fees 10,880.00 

Water Department Collections 4,615,532.47 

Real Estate Interest & Charges 79,536.69 

Personal Property Interest & Charges 2,918.02 

Tax Titles 111,011.30 

Tax Title Interest 70,969.10 

Instruments of Redemption & Recording Fees 450.84 

Total $43,208,676.61 



-16- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 



The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the town of 
Wilmington for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2000 are hereby submitted. This 
report was prepared by the Office of the Town Accountant. Responsibility for 
accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of the presentation, 
including all disclosures, rests with the town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are accurate 
in all material respects and are reported in a manner designed to present 
fairly the financial position and results of operations of the various funds 
and account groups of the government . 

Respectfully submitted, 

1 




Mifchael Morris 
Town Accountant 



-17 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2 000 



Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION 

Combined Balance Sheet -All Fund Types and Account Groups 

Notes to Financial Statements 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances -All Governmental Fund 
Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

Schedule of Budgetary Basis Statement of Revenues and 
Expenditures Budget and Actual -General Fund 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet-Special Revenue 
Accounts 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balance -Special Revenue Accounts 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity-General Fund 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures -Water Department 
Fund 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures -Capital Project 
Fund 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 
Schedule of Trust Funds 



-18- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 



ASSETS 



GENERAL 



TOTAL 

SPECIAL CAPITAL TRUST & LONG-TERM (MEMORANDUM 
REVENUE PROJECTS AGENCY DEBT ONLY) 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 
LESS:PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 
TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOVTS 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 



11,286,936.36 3,883,483.22 12,130,438.64 1,494,464.69 

527,857.16 

(1,396,659.15) 
329,596.96 
169,435.89 
635,479 99 
109,266.50 
129,840.40 

113,141.81 527,128.12 
487,306.01 



675,000.00 



28,795.322.91 

527.857,16 

(1,396,659.15) 
329,596.96 
169,435.89 
635,479.99 
109,266.50 
129,840.40 
640,269.93 
487,306.01 

675,000.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



11,904,895.92 4,897,917.35 12,130,438.64 1,494,464.69 675,000.00 31,102,716.60 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 

DEFERRED REVENUE: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 
OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 

NOTES PAYABLE 

PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 



615,300.77 168,044.39 

527,857.16 

1,486,761.55 1,014,434.13 

120,571.21 



2,615.79 11.095.50 



675,000.00 



797,056.45 

527,857.16 
2,501,195.68 
675,000.00 
120.571.21 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



2,750,490.69 1,182,478.52 



2,615.79 



11,095.50 675,000.00 



4,621,680.50 



FUND BALANCE: 

RES FOR ENCUMBRANCES 2,646,102.24 
RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 

RES. FOR SUBSEQUENT YEARS 500,000.00 

RES. FOR DEF. TEACHERS (106,528.00) 

UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 6,114,830.99 



0.00 3,497,151.36 



3,715,438.83 8,630,671.49 1,483,369.19 



2,646,102.24 
3,497,151.36 

(106,528.00) 
19,944,310.50 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE 



9,154,405.23 3,715,438.83 12,127.822.85 1.483.369.19 



0.00 26,481.036.10 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BALANCE 



11,904,895.92 4,897,917.35 12,130,438.64 1,494,464.69 675,000.00 31,102,716.60 



-19- 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 2000 



1 . Definition of Reporting Entity 

The Town of Wilmington is incorporated as a municipality in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is governed by an elected Board of 
Selectmen and an open Town Meeting. The Board of Selectmen appoint a 
Town Manager who in accordance with Chapter 592 of 1950, serves as chief 
fiscal and administrative officer of the town. Other town officials are 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager. Generally, 
accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires that the accompanying 
general purpose financial statements present the Town of Wilmington (the 
primary government) and its component units. Component units are 
included in the Town's reporting entity if their operational and 
financial relationships with the Town are significant. Pursuant to this 
criteria, the following entities have been excluded from the 
accompanying general purpose financial statements: 

Wilmington Housing Authority - provides housing for the elderly as 
well as subsidizing low income housing units. 

Middlesex County Retirement System - administers the pension 
system for member communities. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District - provides education services for member communities. 

Northeast Solid Waste Committee - provides facilities for waste 
disposal for members communities. 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority - provides sewage disposal 
services . 

2 . Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the town of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for local 
governmental units except as indicated in Note 3 . The following is a 
summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds 
and one account group in order to comply with the 
limitations and restrictions placed on both the resources 
made available to the town and the services provided. The 
various funds are grouped in the financial statements in 
this report into five generic fund types as follows: 

Governmental Funds 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating 
fund of the town. It is used to account for all financial 
resources except those required to be accounted for in 
another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - Special revenue funds are used to 
account for the proceeds of specific revenue resources 
(other than expendable trust or major capital projects) that 
are legally restricted to expenditures for specific 
purposes . 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to 
account for financial resources to be used for the 
acquisition or construction of major capital facilities. 



-20- 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 



Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets by the town in a trustee capacity or as 
an agent for individuals, private organizations, other 
governments and/or other funds. These include expendable 
trust, non-expendable trust and agency funds. Non- 
expendable trust funds are accounted for in a manner that 
permits the periodic measurements of revenues earned, 
expenses incurred and/or net income in order to demonstrate 
maintenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in essentially the same manner as governmental 
funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of 
operations . 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities 
expected to be financed from governmental funds are 
accumulated in the general long-term debt group of accounts. 
This account group is not a fund. It is only concerned with 
the measurement of financial position and, therefore, is not 
involved with a measurement of the results from any 
operations . 

Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. 
This method recognizes revenues when they become measurable 
and available. Expenses are recognized under this method as 
they are incurred. 

Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they 
become available. Available means then due or past due and 
receivable within the current period or expected to be 
collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay 
liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when 
cash is received. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to 
intergovernmental revenues, the legal and contractual 
requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as 
guidance. There are, however, essentially two types of 
these revenues. In one, moneys must be expended on the 
specific purpose or project before any amounts will be paid 
to the town. Therefore, revenues are recognized based upon 
the expenditures recorded. In the other, moneys are 
virtually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and are 
usually revocable only for failure to comply with prescribed 
compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the 
susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a 
cash disbursement basis. In addition, as required by 
Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made during the 
fifteen days immediately following the close of each fiscal 
year and which pertain to the prior year are recorded as 
warrants payable and expenses as of June 3 0th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, 
accordingly, as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 



■21- 



Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenue that is 
measurable but not available has been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 3 0th. 

Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase 
orders, contracts and other commitments for the expenditure 
of funds are recorded in order to reserve that portion of 
the applicable appropriation, is employed in governmental 
funds. Open encumbrances at year-end are reported as 
reservations of fund balances. Encumbrances do not 
constitute expenditures or liabilities. 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are 
recorded as expenditures when purchased (purchase method) . 

General Fixed Assets - General fixed assets are recorded as 
expenditures in applicable governmental funds. The town 
does not capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a 
general fixed asset account group, which is consistent with 
the practice of many municipalities in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts . 

C . Total Columns 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned 
Memorandum Only to indicate that they are presented only to 
facilitate financial analysis. Data in these columns do not 
present financial position, results of operations or changes 
in financial position in conformity with generally accepted 
accounting principles. Such data is not comparable to a 
consolidation since interfund eliminations have not been 
made . 

D . Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Contributory 
Retirement System, a single employer plan, established under 
Chapter 32 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Substantially all full-time and some part- 
time employees of the town except teachers and certain 
administrative personnel employed by the School Department 
participate in the system. Benefits paid under the plan, 
referred to as retirement allowance, include both an annuity 
portion, funded principally from amounts contributed by the 
participants, and a pension portion funded by the town. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their 
compensation annually, determined by their date of 
employment. The employer contribution by the town as 
determined by the County's actuarial valuation normal cost 
plus the amortization of the original unfunded actuarial 
liability . 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan 
administered by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board. 
Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and therefore, the town does 
not contribute to the plan. 

3 . Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statements. 



-22- 



The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 



A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with 
Chapter 32 of the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
(see note ID) . 

B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as 
expenditures at the time purchases is made rather than being 
capitalized in a general fixed asset group of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are 
recorded as expenditures rather than assets at time of 
purchase . 

Budgetary Accounting 

An annual budget is legally adopted for the General Fund. All financial 
orders are initiated or recommended at Town meetings. Expenditures are 
limited to the line items as voted at the Town meetings. Department 
heads may not transfer, without approval, appropriation balances from 
one expenditure account to another within their department or budget. 
These along with transfers or unencumbered appropriation balances 
between departments or agencies must be approved at Town Meetings. 

Long-term Debt 

State law permits the town to authorize indebtedness up to a limit of 5% 
of its equalized valuation. Debt issued in accordance with this state 
law is designated as being inside the debt limit. In addition, however, 
a town may authorize debt in excess of that limit for specific purposes. 
Such debt when issued is designated as being outside the debt limit. 
The following summarized the annual debt service requirements as of June 
30, 2000. 



General Obligation Bonds 
Year ending June 30, 

2001 

2002 



Principal 
450 , 000 
225 , 000 
675 , 000 



Interest 
24 , 244 
5, 512 
29, 756 



Total 
474 , 244 
230, 512 
704 , 756 



As of June 30, 2000, the town had authorized and unissued debt of $37,015,000 
as outlined below. 



Comprehensive Middle School 
Public Safety Building 
Route 38 Corridor Sewer Project 
Lowell Street Sewer Project 



$25, 600, 000 
$ 8,000,000 
$ 985,000 
$ 1,430,000 



$36, 015, 000 



-23- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 














Fiduciary 












Fund Types 


Total 




General 


Special 


Capital 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 






Revenue 


Projects 


Trust 


Only) 


REVENUES: 












General Property Taxes 


34,307,419.15 








34,307,419.15 


Tax Liens 


134,177.62 


118,444.78 






252,622.40 


Special Assessments 


( o,U4^.yo 








74,281.82 


Excise 


2,450,987.04 








2,450,987.04 


Penalties 


213,759.37 








213,759.37 


Licenses and Permits 


319,834.78 






22,452.05 


342,286.83 


Intergovernmental 


6,488,761.25 


2,470,462.14 




1,122.65 


8 960 346 04 


Charges for Services 


1,854,260.13 


5,270,480.15 




507 422 29 


7 63? 16? 57 


Fines 


148,768.16 








148 768 16 


Fees 


48,697.97 








48 697 97 


Interest Earnings 


1,256,582.65 


13,426.44 




57 552 47 


1 327 561 56 


BAN 


102,294.85 




33,985,000.00 




34,087,294.85 


Other 


598,308.16 


169,813.88 




1,182,461.66 


l!95o!583.70 


Total Revenues 


47,996,894,11 


8,043,866.23 


33,985,000.00 


1,771,011.12 


91,796,771.46 


EXPENDITURES: 












General Government 


1,242,644.52 


13,365.67 


15,596,160 18 


1,070,243.50 


17,922,413.87 


Public Safety 


5,005.081.50 


163.666 82 




439,225.06 


5,607,973.38 


Human Services 


720.29660 


24,960 84 




12,151.15 


757,40859 


Public Works 


4 303.653.49 


1,811,04857 


1.220.847 70 


35000 


7.335,899 76 


Community Development 


C >l 4 ICO OC 

d41 252 3d 


21 1 ,62.1 A4 






818,589 80 


Building Maintenance 


2.309.040 52 


4.497.72 




55,456.49 


2,368,994.73 


Education 


20,412,040.49 


2,452,879.51 




152,583.27 


23,017,503.27 


Recreation 


108.965.52 


500,656.91 






609,622.43 


Veterans' Services 


11,562.78 








1 1 "ifi? 7ft 

1 1 , JD^. / O 


Debt and Interest 


1,635,720.00 








1,635,720.00 


1 lnrl?i^^ifipH 

\J 1 11 


3,873,002.21 


13,724.32 






3 886 7?6 53 


.^tatiitnrv Charnps 


3 292,102.89 








3,292,102.89 


Capital Outlay 


863,472.98 


491,873.72 






1,355,346. /O 


RAN 


0.00 




27 985 000 00 




27,985,000.00 


Warrant Articles 


54,244^44 








54,244.44 


Total Expenditures 


44,373,090.30 


5,754,001.52 


44,802,007.88 


1,730,009.47 


96,659,109.17 


Excess (deficiency) of 












Revenues over Expenditures 


O COT 00*5 Q1 




/I A Q17 HAT QQ\ 
(1U,01 /,UU# OOj 


41,001.65 


(4,862,337 71) 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 












Operating Transfers In 


519,005.00 








CiQ nnc AA 
Diy.UUD.UU 


Operating Transfers Out 




(499.005 00) 




(20,000.00) 


(519.005 00) 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses 


CIO r\nc nn 


(4yy,uuD.uuj 


u.uu 


(20,000.00) 


0.00 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 












and Other Financing Sources 












over Expenditures and Other Uses 


4,142,808.81 


1,790,859.71 


(10,817,007.88) 


21,001.65 


(4,862,337.71) 


Fund Balance July 1, 1999 


5,306,914.25 


2,994,797.56 


21,874,612.29 


1,462,367.54 


31,638,691.64 


Fund Balance Transfers 




(1,070,218.44) 


1,070,218.44 




0.00 


Increase in Provision for 












Abatements and Exemptions 


(295,317.83) 








(295,317.83) 


Fund Balance June 30, 2000 


9,154,405.23 


3,715,438.83 


12,127,822.85 


1,483.369.19 


26,481,036.10 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF BUDGETARY BASIS STATEMENT OF 
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES BUDGET AND ACTUAL - GENERAL FUND 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 





GENERAL 


GENERAL 


GENERAL 




BUDGET 


ACTUAL 


VARIANCE 


REVENUES: 








General Property Taxes 


34,137,616 


34,441,597 


303,981 


Special Assessments 


3,000 


73,043 


70,043 


Excise 


2,200,000 


2,450,987 


250,987 


Penalties 


135,000 


213,759 


78,7d9 


Licenses and Permits 


250,000 


319,835 


69,835 


Intergovernmental 


6,527,527 


6,488,761 


(38,766) 


Charges for Services 


1,951,153 


1,854,260 


(96,893) 


Fines 


142,000 


148,768 


6,768 


Fees 


40,000 


48,698 


8,698 


Interest Eamings 


650,000 


1,256,583 


606,583 


Other 


199,000 


700,603 


501,603 


Total Revenues 


46,235,296 


47,996,894 


1,761,598 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES: 








Operating Transfers 


519,005 


519,005 





Total Other Financing Sources 


519,005 


519,005 





Total Revenue and Other 








Financing Sources 


46,754,301 


48,515,899 


1,761,598 


EXPENDITURES: 








General Govemment 


1,326,920 


1,322,853 


4,067 


Public Safety 


4,898,762 


5,017,130 


(118,368) 


Human Services 


729,542 


717,830 


11,712 


Public Works 


4,989,037 


4,914,001 


75,036 


Community Development 


536,633 


535,058 


1,575 


Building Maintenance 


<i,oUy,440 






Education 




on con 7CQ 


(o1,1 /b) 


Recreation 


107.526 


108,966 


(1,440) 


Veterans Services 


18,250 


11,563 


6,687 


Debt and Interest 


1,739,746 


1,619,720 


120,026 


Unclassified 


4,141,562 


3,849,323 


292,239 


Statutory Charges 


4,039,230 


3,975,151 


64,079 


Capital Outlay 


898,798 


906,671 


(7,873) 


Warrant Articles 


37,550 


35,151 


2,399 


Total Expenditures 


46,282,593 


45,939,435 


343,158 


Excess (deficiency) of 








Revenues over Expenditures 


471,708 


2,576,464 





-25- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 



ASSETS 



GRANTS 



RESERVED FOR REVOLVING 
GIFTS APPROPRIATION FUNDS WATER 



TOTAL 
(MEMORANDUM 
ONLY) 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 
LESS:PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 
TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOVTS 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 



660,316.45 10,696.22 



392,791.95 686,330.08 2,133,348.52 



3,883,483.22 



487,306.01 



527,128.12 



527,128.12 
487,306.01 



TOTAL ASSETS 



1,147,622.46 10,696.22 



392,791.95 686,330.08 2,660,476.64 



4,897,917.35 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 44,403.36 
DEFERRED REVENUE: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 487,306.01 
NOTES PAYABLE 
PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 



61,735.09 61,905.94 168,044.39 



527,128.12 1,014,434.13 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



531,709.37 0.00 



0.00 61,735.09 589,034.06 1,182.478.52 



FUND BALANCE: 
RES FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
RES. FOR SPEC PURPOSE 
RES. FOR SUBSEQUENT YEARS 
RES. FOR DEF TEACHERS 
UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE 



615,913.09 10,696.22 
615,913.09 10,696.22 



0.00 



392,791.95 624,594.99 2,071,442.58 3,715,438.83 



392,791.95 624,594.99 2,071,442.58 3,715,438.83 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 

& FUND BALANCE 1,147,622.46 10,696.22 392,791.95 686,330.08 2,660,476 64 4,897,917.35 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 



REVENUES: 
General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Charges for Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 

BAN 

Other 

Total Revenues 



Grants Gifts Reserved for Revolving 
Appropnation Funds 



Water 



Total 



2,344,137.22 



118,444.78 118,444.78 
1,238.84 1,238.84 



126,324.92 2,470,462.14 
34,894.05 2,099,665.38 3,135,920.72 5,270,480.15 



3,198.91 0.41 8,516.25 1,710.87 13,426.44 

16,242.00 36.960.94 12,55851 76,837 99 27,214.44 169.813 88 
2.363,578.13 36.961 35 55,968 81 2,304,539.16 3,282,818.78 8.043,866.23 



EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public WorVs 
Community Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Statutory Charges 
Capital Outlay 
BAN 

Warrant Artcles 
Total Expenditures 

Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 
Operating Transfers In 
Operatng Transfers Out 

Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 

Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other Uses 

Fund Balance July 1. 1999 

Fund Balance Transfers 

Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 



807.16 
130,666.82 33,000.00 



19,214.63 
217,308.76 
275,572.22 

741,022.07 



13,724.32 



1,908.40 



12,558.51 



350.00 
521.85 



3,837.81 



13,365.67 
163,666.82 
24,960 84 



1,245.24 1,592,144.57 1,811,048.57 



1,233.37 
4,497.72 
1,711,857.44 
500,656.91 



277,327.44 
4,497.72 
2,452,879.51 
500,656.91 



13,724.32 
491,873.72 491,873.72 



1.398,315 98 34.908.40 



13.430.36 2,223,328.49 2,084,018.29 5,754,001.52 



965,262.15 2,052.95 42,538.45 81,210.67 1.198,800.49 2,289,864.71 



(40,000.00) 



(459,005.00) (499,005.00) 



0.00 



0.00 (40,000.00) 



0.00 (459,005.00) (499,005.00) 



965,262.15 2,052.95 2,538.45 81,210.67 739,795.49 1,790,859.71 

(349,349.06) 8.643.27 390,253.50 543,384.32 2,401,865.53 2,994,797.56 

(1,070,218.44) (1,070,218.44) 



Fund Balance June 30. 2000 



615.913.09 10.696.22 392,791.95 624,594.99 2,071,442.58 3,715,438.83 



ll 



-27- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 2000 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 



Selectmen 
Selectmen 



Elections 
Elections 
Ebctions 



Registrars 
Registrars 



Finance Comm 
Finance Comm 



Town Manager 
Town Manager 
Town Manager 
Town Manager 



Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 



Treas/Collector 
Treas/Co lector 
Treas/Collector 
Treas/Collector 



Town Clerk 
Town Cferi< 
Town Cleri< 



Assessors 
Assessors 
Assessors 
Assessors 



Town Counsel 



Salanes 
Expenses 



Salanes 

Constable 

Expenses 



Salanes 
Expenses 



Salanes 
Expenses 



Salary-Town Manager 
Salanes-Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip 



Sal-Town Accountant 

Salanes-Other 

Expenses 



Sal-Treas/Collector 
Salanes-Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip 



Salary-Town Cferk 

Salanes-Other 

Expenses 



Sal-Pnn Assessor 
Salanes-Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip 



Contractual Services 



Permanent BIdg Comm Salanes 
Permanent BkJg Comm Expenses 

General Government Subtotal 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 

Poice Salary-Chief 
Poloe Sal-Dep Chief 



AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 






AMT CFWD TO 




FY 2000 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES 




FY 2001 FRO 


CLOSING 


FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 2000 


rloUAL ZUUU 




BALANCE 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


000 


2,880 


2,880 00 


2,880 00 


0.00 


000 


ooo 


00 


12,000 


12,000 00 


11,376 94 


623 06 


623 06 


000 


00 


14,880 


i*(,OOU Uu 


h.zjd yn 


623 06 


623 06 


00 


000 


15,832 


15,832 00 


13,910 53 


1 921 47 


00 


1 921 47 


00 


125 


125 00 


125 00 


00 


00 


00 


43 50 


4,200 


4,200 00 


4,161 21 


82 29 


70 00 


12 29 


43 50 


20,157 


tU, \JI w 


1 , 1 It 


2,003 76 


70 00 


1,933 76 


00 


1,700 


1,700 00 


1,700 00 


00 


000 


00 


00 


5,015 


5,015 00 


5,004 80 


10 20 


000 


10 20 


00 


6,715 


6,715 00 


6,704 80 


10 20 


00 


10 20 


000 


900 


yuu UU 


ydL uy 


307 91 


000 


307 91 


00 


6,585 


c cQc nn 


c con 17 


54 83 


00 


54 83 


000 


7,485 


7,485 00 


7,122 26 


362 74 


00 


36274 


000 


92,021 


QT T^A 1 A 
yZ./£4 14 


Ql T^A 1 A 


00 


00 


000 


000 


227,797 




161,0)3 \ yo 


000 


00 


000 


324 00 


53,045 


30,U40 UU 




1,081 48 


1.081 48 


00 


00 


600 


600 00 


600 00 


00 


00 


00 


324 00 


373 463 


379,261 09 


378.503 61 


1,081 48 


1,081 48 


00 


00 


66.687 


C7 inn "JO 
b/ ,.;UU jy 


C7 onn QQ 

0/ jy 


00 


00 


00 


00 


125 040 


1^D,U4U UU 


uz,41 J of 


2 626 43 


00 


2,626 43 


61 25 


2,375 


L.jlj UU 


1 9Qn AA 


1,145 81 


00 


1,145 81 


61 25 


194 102 


194,615 39 


190,904 40 


3 772 24 


00 


3,772 24 


00 


53,777 


Q,A ion m 
lyu J 1 


ciA iQn si 


00 


00 


00 


00 


112,867 


in T\A 11 

\ 1 J, / J** i c 


1 11 I'^A 11 


00 


00 


00 


00 


35,695 


0J,U3j uu 




6,182 99 


00 


6,182 99 


00 


850 


8S0 nn 


752 04 


97 96 


00 


97 96 


00 


203,189 


204,470 23 


198,189 28 


6,280 95 


00 


6,280 95 


000 


57,435 


j/,o/b il 


C7 Q7C "30 
t)/ ,0/0 


000 


00 


000 


000 


70,222 


70.762 01 


70,762 01 


000 


000 


00 


00 


2,380 


2,380 00 


2,259 10 


120 90 


63 12 


57 78 


00 


130,037 


131,018 33 


130,897 43 


120 90 


63 12 


57 78 


00 


69,985 


7n 19'^ IQ 


7(1 ci'j cq 


O.UU 


00 


00 


00 


73,557 


74,110 19 


74,110 19 


00 


00 


00 


29,602 89 


139,050 


139.050 00 


60,250 08 


108,402 81 


108,402 81 


00 


00 


3,200 


3.200 00 


3,200 00 


00 


00 


00 






286,883 78 


208.083 86 


lUO '*U£ 1 


lUO /lUi 1 


n nn 
u uu 


00 


89 000 


89,000 00 


89.000 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


89,000 


89,000 00 


89,000 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


2,000 


2,000 00 


698 68 


1,301 32 


00 


1,30132 


00 


100 


100 00 


86 52 


13 48 


00 


13 48 


00 


2,100 


2,100 00 


785 20 


1,314 80 


00 


1,314 80 


30,031 64 


1,326,920 


1.336,585 82 


1,242,644 52 


123,972 94 


110.240 47 


13,732 47 


00 


89,988 


91,07546 


91,075 46 


00 


00 


00 


00 


66,992 


67,506 92 


67,506 92 


0.00 


00 


00 



•28- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 2000 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER* 






AMT CFWD Tf) 








FY 2000 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES 




FY 7001 FRO 








FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 2000 


FISCAL 2000 


FISCAL 2000 


BAI ANCF 


CjccAi 5000 


DAI Aurc 


Polce 


SaL-Ueut. 


n nn 


1 1Z,^7^ 


112 992 00 


109,481 79 


•5 cm 01 


n nn 
u uu 


Q cm 01 
J.blU^l 


Polce 


Sal-Sgis 


00 


283.911 


311.164 22 


311,164 22 


000 


000 


000 


Polce 


Sal-Patroknen 


00 


1,212,995 


1,254,900 32 


1,254,900 32 


000 


000 


000 


Polce 


Sal-Cfencal 


000 


66,567 


67,31875 


67,318 75 


000 


000 


000 


Polce 


SaL -Dispatchers 


000 


70,006 


70,006 00 


69,925 62 


80 38 


000 


80 38 


Polce 


SaL-Fil In Costs 


000 


261,000 


321,000 00 


311,936 73 


9.063 27 


000 


9063 27 


Polce 


SaL-Pd Holdays 


000 


77,318 


79.644 75 


79,644 75 


00 


000 


00 


Polce 


Sat -Specials! 


000 


10.700 


11.200 00 


11,200 00 


000 


000 


00 


Polce 


SaL-lrrcenlive 


000 


199.968 


206.242 91 


206.24291 


000 


000 


00 


Polce 


Sal -Night Diff 


000 


32,760 


32.760 00 


32.319 00 


441 00 


000 


441 00 


Polce 


Expenses 


358 14 


180.560 


180.560 00 


180,918 14 


00 


000 


00 


Polce 


Sick Leave Buyback 


00 


14,360 


14,360 00 


13.183 74 


1,176 26 


000 


1,176 26 






358 14 


9 fiSd 117 

£,DOU, 1 1 / 


2.820.731 33 


2.806.818 35 


14 271 12 


n no 

U Uu 


AA 071 10 

14, 1 1£ 


Fine Dept 


oal -uniei 


u uti 


0£. loo 


OT 010 70 
0^,0 13/0 


Qc \3 t 


n nn 
u uu 


U UU 


n AA 

U UU 


Fire Dept 


oai -uep untei 


n nn 
u uu 




62 548 37 


62 548 37 


u uu 


A nn 
u uu 


A AA 
U UU 


Fire DepI 


Sal -Lieut 


000 


271 058 


273,232 94 


273 232 94 


00 


00 


000 


Fire Dept 


Sal -Pnvates 


00 


1.222 032 


1,222 032 00 


1 202 745 73 


19 286 27 


000 


19 286 27 


Fire Dept 


SaL-ClerWDisplch 


000 


65 149 


65 649 33 


65 649 33 


00 


000 


000 


Fire Dept 


^al -Pari Timp 


00 


8.320 


8 320 00 


6,240 00 


? oflo no 

C UU<J \J\J 


00 


AOA AA 
£. \JO\J UU 


Fire Dept 


Sal -Overtime Costs 


000 


220 000 


236 043 43 


236 043 43 


00 


00 


00 


Fire Dept 


oaL-ro noiaays 


n nn 


00 Doi 


86,582 00 


84 885 42 


1 OjO jo 


n nn 
u uu 




Fire Dept 


Sal-lncentive/EMT 


000 


10.025 


in AO*; ciTi 


lU UZj uu 


000 


000 


000 


Fire DepI 


Sal-0 T Fire Alarm 


000 


15.000 


15,608 15 


15 608 15 


000 


000 


00 


Fire Dept 


Expenses 


850 74 


85.200 


85,200 00 


84,109 05 


1 941 69 


7208 


1 869 61 


Fire DepI, 


Sick Leave Buyback 


000 


19,242 


19.242 00 


17,638 72 


1 603 28 


00 


1 603 28 


Fire DepI 


Furnish & Equip 


21735 67 


41.000 


41 000 00 


27,815 19 


34 920 48 


34.920 48 


000 






22.586 41 


2.188,045 


2.208.303 00 


2 169,361 11 


61,528 30 


34.992 56 


26.535 74 


Animal Conlrol 


Salanes 


000 


26,000 


26.200 01 


26,200 01 


00 


000 


000 


Animal ConlrDi 


Cont Services 


n ATI 


A Ann 


4,000 00 


2,582 04 


1.11/ y t3 


n tv\ 
U UU 


1.417 96 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


000 


600 


600 00 


119 99 


480 01 


00 


48001 






000 


30.600 


30.800 01 


28 902 04 


1,897 97 


000 


1,897 97 


Prot Persons & Prop. Sublolal 


22,944 55 


4,898762 


5.059 834 34 


5,005 081 50 


77 697 39 


34,992 56 


42 704 83 


PUBLIC WORKS: 


















Engineenng Div 


Salanes 


000 


138 279 


138 279 00 


134 345 78 


3 433 22 


000 


3 433 22 


Engineenng Div 


Salanes-Part Time 


00 


31 248 


31 329 12 


31 329 12 


00 


000 


000 


Engineenng Div 


Expenses 


000 


3 500 


3 500 00 


2 346 62 


1 153 38 


OOO 


1 153 38 






00 


173 027 


173 108 12 


168 521 52 


4 586 60 


00 


4 5fifi fin 


Highway Division 


Sal-DPW Supt 


00 


73,382 


73 946 36 


73,946 36 


00 


00 


00 


Highway DivisKin 


Salanes-Other 


00 


940,852 


989.791 35 


989,791 35 


000 


000 


000 


Highway Division 


Stream Mainl Sal 


000 


15.120 


15.120 00 


14,295 88 


824 12 


000 


824 12 


Highway Division 


Stream Man! Exp 


000 


1 000 


1.000 00 


880 67 


119 33 


000 


119 33 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


000 


244,350 


244.350 00 


238 374 39 


5 975 61 


1,849 75 


4 125 86 


Highway Division 


Rd Mach Exp 


000 


65.000 


65.000 00 


50,932 94 


14,067 06 


99 00 


13.968 06 


Highway Division 


Fuel & Other 


000 


117,090 


117 090 00 


117.090 00 


000 


000 


000 


Highway Division 


Dranage Projects 


000 


25,000 


25.000 00 


23,27529 


1.724 71 


000 


1.724 71 


Highway Division 


Pubic SI Lights 


000 


211,060 


211,060 00 


205 356 73 


5 703 27 


5,703 27 


(0 00) 


Highway Division 


Furnish & Equip 


000 


29.000 


29,000 00 


28 187 39 


81261 


000 


812 61 




000 


1,721,854 


1,771,357 71 


1,742,131 00 


29 226 71 


7,652 02 


21 574 69 


Snow & Ice Conlrol 


Salanes 


000 


135514 


109 245 81 


85 368 42 


23 877 39 


000 


23 877 39 


Snow & Ice Control 


Expenses 


000 


236.570 


155,862 00 


148 323 00 


7 539 00 


000 


7 539 00 






00 


372 084 


265 107 81 


233 691 42 


31 416 39 


00 


31 416 39 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


577,149 31 


1,876 000 


1,876 000 00 


1 524 708 97 


928 440 34 


928.440 34 


000 






577,149 31 


1 876 000 


1,876,000 00 


1,524,708 97 


928 440 34 


928 440 34 


00 



-29- 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 2000 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 






AMT CFWD TO 








FY 2000 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES 




FY 2001 FRO 


CLOSING 






FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 2000 


FISCAL 2000 


FISCAL 2000 


BAUNCE 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


Tree Division 


Salanes 


0.00 


140.194 


140,194 00 


140,164.79 


2921 


OOO 


2921 


Tree Division 


Expenses 


000 


9.395 


Q OOC Art 




2.327 20 


OOO 


2,327 20 






000 


149,589 


149, boy 00 


147,232 59 


2,356.41 


OOO 


2,356.41 


Paries & Grounds Div 


Salanes 


000 


200.811 


207.120 20 


207,120 20 


00 


000 


OOO 


PariiS & Grounds Div 


Expenses 


000 


32.400 


32,400 00 


32,267 07 


132 93 


00 


132 93 






000 


233,211 






132 93 


00 


13293 


Cemetery Division 


Salanes 


000 


118 675 


izl.UUy jO 


n 1 Ann 


00 


00 


00 


Cemetery Division 


Expenses 


000 


25,750 


£j, / jU UU 


IC QAO 7A 


8,946 30 


5,465 00 


3.481 30 






000 


144,425 


146,759 35 


137.813 05 


8,946 30 


5,465 00 


3,481 30 


Sewer Division 


Personnel Services 


000 


48,097 


48.097 00 


35.356 98 


12,740 02 


00 


12,74002 


Sewer Division 


tvlaint & Operations 


70,530 31 


70,750 


320,750 00 


74,810,69 


316,469 62 


316,469 62 


00 






70,530 31 


118,847 


?fift ft47 on 


1 m ifi7 fi7 

1 1 U, 1 D ( .Uf 


329.209 64 


316,469 62 


12,740,02 


Public Works Subtota 




647.679 62 


4,789.037 


4.990,289 19 


4.303,65349 


1.334,315.32 


1,258,026 98 


76,288 34 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 
















Board of Health 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


57.578 




CO A1 00 


000 


000 


000 


Board of Health 


Salanes- Other 


000 


126,014 


126,014 00 


4 OC OC t A A 

125,864 44 


149.56 


0.00 


149 56 


Board of Health 


Expenses 


900 00 


8,580 


8,580 00 


9,226 38 


253 62 


OOO 


253 62 


Board of Health 


Ivtental Health 


1,763 33 


22,200 


22,200 00 


23.963 33 


00 


OOO 


OOO 


Board of Health 


Furnish & Equip 


000 


700 


700 00 


700 00 


00 


00 


000 




2.663.33 


215,072 


TIK RIO 99 
Z 1 J, J IZ Li 


917 779 ^^7 
c \ 1 ,1 1 cot 


403 18 


00 


403,18 


Seaier/Wght & Meas 


Salanes 


000 


4,500 


A CAT! An 


A OAA AA 

4,<:UU UU 


300 00 


00 


300 00 


Sealer/Wght & Meas 


Expenses 


00 


80 


Ro nn 

uU UU 


n nn 

U UU 


80 00 


00 


80 00 




00 


4 580 


4,580 00 


4,200 00 


380 00 


00 


380 00 


Planning/Conservation 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


60,001 


fin dK9 7Q 


fin dfi9 7C| 


00 


00 


000 


Planning/Conservalion 


Salanes- Other 


000 


114,314 


114,314 00 


113,548 10 


765 90 


00 


765.90 


Planning/Conservation 


Expenses 


7 con nc 


13,500 


13 son nn 


16 ftnfi 77 


4,381 18 


A OOA AA 

4,380 00 


1 18 




7,689 95 


187,815 


1AA 97fi 7Q 


ion ftiQ fifi 
lyu.o ly DO 


5,147 08 


4,380 00 


767 08 


BkJg Inspector 


Sal-BkJg Inspector 


0.00 


52,252 


52,651 14 


52,651 14 


00 


00 


0.00 


BIdg Inspector 


Satanes-Other 


000 


71,589 


n,ooy UU 


71 COQ OQ 


60 71 


00 


60 71 


Bbg Inspector 


Expenses 


231 54 


5,325 


c "inc AA 

0,ozD UU 


A oQA on 
4,^yu-yu 


1,265.64 


0,00 


1,265.64 






231 54 


129,166 


129,565 14 


128,470 33 


1,326 35 


000 


1,326 35 


Community Development Subtotal 


10.584 82 


536,633 


537,934 15 


541.26236 


7,25661 


4.380 00 


2,87661 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 


















Pubic Buildings 


Sal-Supenntendent 


ooo 


84,389 


85.038 39 


85.038 39 


00 


00 


000 


Pubic Buildings 


Salanes-Other 


000 


1,579.571 


1.586,726 82 


1,586.726 82 


000 


000 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


Fuel Heating 


2 040 42 


214 000 


214,000 00 


206,149 13 


9 R91 99 


Q 891 99 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


Electnc-Town BIdgs 


00 


98.000 


98,000 00 


98,000 00 


00 


00 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


Utiities-Town BIdgs 


00 


67 000 


67 000 00 


58,884 52 


8,11548 


8,11548 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


Expenses-Town BkJgs 


670 99 


74 600 


89,600 00 


82,558 55 


7.712 44 


7,712 44 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


Expenses-School BIdg 


00 


137 185 


140185 00 


140,185 00 


00 


00 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


Asbestos Repair 


00 


4 000 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


000 


000 


000 


Pubic Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


6,550 33 


9.500 


9,500 00 


3,342 47 


12,707 86 


12,707 86 


00 


Pubic Buildings 


HVAC Repairs 


2,955 64 


41,200 


41,200 00 


44,155 64 


0,00 


00 


00 




12.217 38 


2,309,445 


2.335,250 21 


2.309.040 52 


38,427 07 


38,427 07 


0.00 


Public Buildings Subtotal 


12.217 38 


2,309,445 


2.335,250 21 


2,309,040 52 


38,427 07 


38,427 07 


000 


HUMAN SERVICES: 


















Veterans 


Salary 


0.00 


6,500 


6,550 00 


6.550 00 


00 


00 


00 



-30- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 2000 







AUT rFwn Tn 

HM ) V/ITIU l\J 








FY 2000 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 






FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 2000 


Veterans 


Exfjenses 




1 750 


Veterans 


Assistance 




in nivi 
lU uvu 








1 otn 
10 ZDU 


Library 


Salary-Director 


000 


52 265 


Library 


OdKlDCb-L'UKSI 


00 




bbrary 


Expenses 


00 


115 344 


Lit)rary 


Pi im i. Pniim 
rUIII 01 C^UI)J. 


000 


11 195 






n nn 

U w 


J/ 1 ,D ly 


Recreation 


Salary-Director 


000 


62,028 


Recreatwn 


Salanes-Other 


00 


42 698 


Recreation 


Expenses 


GO 


2 800 






A nn 




Eber^ Services 


Salary-Director 


000 


39,528 


Elderly Services 


Satanes-Other 


000 


59,670 


Elderly Services 


Expenses 


000 


34,800 


Elderly Services 


Fum & Equip 


00 


2500 






000 


136 498 


Histoncal Comm 


Salanes 


000 


14 025 


Histoncal Comm 


Expenses 


5 816 33 


4 650 


Histoncal Comm 


Fum & Equip 


000 


2 000 






5.816 33 


2067500 


Handicapped Comm 


Salanes 


000 


500 


Handicapped Comm 


Expenses 


000 


250 






OOO 


750 


Human Services Subtotal 


5.816 33 


855,318 


EDUCATION: 








School Dept 


Salanes 


000 


14651.575 


School Dept 


Expenses 


164,709 90 


3,730.725 






164 709 90 


18.382.300 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


000 


2 127.292 






000 


2 127 292 


Education Subtotal 




164,709 90 


20 509 592 


DEBT SERVICE; 








Debt & Interest 


Schools 


000 


93.083 


Debt & Interest 


Gen Government 


000 


299.858 


Debt & Interest 


Sevi«r 


000 


103.064 


Debt & Interest 


Water 


000 


150,241 


Debt & Interest 


Auth Fees & tAsc 


16,000 00 


1,093,500 






16,000 00 


1,739,746 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 


16,000 00 


1 739,746 


UNCUSSIFIED: 








Veterans' Retirement 




000 


13,321 


Empby Retire Unused Sick Leawe 


000 


20.625 


Medicare Empbyers' Contnbution 


000 


208 000 


Salary Ad| & Add Costs 




000 


125,000 


Local Trans/Training Conf 


000 


7,500 


Out of Slate Travel 




000 


1.500 


Computer Hardware & Software 






Maint & Expenses 




14 841 23 


152625 



TRANSFER & 






AUT fFwn Tn 
MM 1 nu 1 \J 




APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES 




FY 2001 FRO 


CLOSING 


FISCAL 2000 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


1 750 00 


1 750 00 


n nn 
u uu 


n nn 


n nn 
U UU 


10,000 00 


3.262 78 


0./ J/ LL 


n nn 


0/0/ LL 


18 300 00 


11 562 78 


c Til n 


n nn 


6,737 22 


52,666 72 


52.666 72 


000 


000 


000 


392.815 00 


384.599 88 


ft 91^1 10 
O.ZlJ 1^ 


n nn 




115.344 00 


115.101 12 




n nn 




11.195 00 


11,185 80 


Q on 


n nn 


Q on 


572,020 72 


563.553 52 


Q >IC7 on 

0,40/ 


n nn 


8.467 20 


62.505 35 


62.505 35 


000 


000 


0.00 


44.015 19 


44,015 19 


(1 nn 


n nn 


A An 

U UU 


2.800 00 


2,444 98 


"^^^ 00 


n nn 

U UU 


jDO Ut 


109.320 54 


108.965 52 




n AA 
U UU 


355 02 


39.831 86 


39.831.86 


000 


0.00 


000 


59.670 00 


58.868 61 


801 39 


000 


801 39 


34 800 00 


34 527 33 


272 67 


00 


272.67 


2.500 00 


2 500 00 


000 


000 


000 


136.801 86 


135.727 80 


1 074 06 


00 


1 074 06 


14 025 00 


11 898 75 


2 126 25 


00 


2 126 25 


4 650 00 


8 517 63 


1 948 70 


1.948 70 


000 


2 000 00 


598 90 


1 401 10 


1.401 10 


000 


20.67500 


21.01528 


5.476 05 


3,34980 


2.126 25 


500 00 


000 


500 00 


000 


500 00 


250 00 


000 


250 00 


000 


250 00 


750 00 


000 


750 00 


000 


750 00 


857.868 12 


840,824 90 


22.859 55 


3.349 80 


19.509 75 


14.651.57500 


14.619.344 76 


32.230 24 


32.230 24 


000 


3.791.193 00 


3.644.695 73 


311.207 17 


311,207 17 


000 


18.442.768 00 


18,264,040 49 


343.437 41 


343.437 41 


00 


2.148.000 00 


2 148,000 00 


000 


000 


000 


2,148.000 00 


2,148,000 00 


000 


000 


000 


20.590 768 00 


20,412,04049 


343.437 41 


343 437 41 


000 


93 083 00 


93 082 50 


050 


000 


050 


299 858 00 


299.857 50 


50 


000 


0.50 


103.064 00 


103,063 75 


25 


000 


0.25 


150.241 00 


150,241 00 


000 


000 


000 


1.093.500 00 


989,475 25 


120.024 75 


000 


120,024 75 


1.739746 00 


1,635,720 00 


120.026 00 


OOO 


120,026 00 


1 739 746 00 


1,635,720 00 


1 90 n9fi nn 


n nn 


IOA AOfi An 

Itu.UiO UU 


15.859 84 


15,859 84 


000 


000 


000 


21,797 21 


21,79721 


000 


000 


0.00 


208 000 00 


205,520 43 


2.479 57 


OOO 


2,479 57 


10.633 01 


10,633 01 


000 


000 


000 


7.500 00 


2,107 42 


5.392 58 


000 


5.39258 


1.500 00 


000 


1 500 00 


000 


1.500 00 


152 625 00 


108,063 36 


59 402 87 


59 402 87 


000 



-31- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 2000 



AMT CFWO TO 





FY 2000 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 




FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 2000 


Wcrofilm Projects 




1 000 

I.UUU 


Annual Audit 


n (Yi 


1*^ QOO 


Ambulance Bilng 


n no 

U Uv 


12 000 


Town Report 


U KAJ 


10 000 


Professjonal & Tech, Services 




25 000 


Deferred Teachers Salaries 


00 


106 527 


Reserve Fund 


0,00 


140,000 


Insurance & Bonds 


fiQ ftsn 00 


TO 01D 

J J?.U 1 \J 


Empbyee Health & Life Insurance 


?41 fi16 70 

£,*t 1 ,\J 1 U £.U 


7 800 000 


Unclassified Subtotal 


•3C7 A") A T) 

JD/, iz4 l£ 


Q7C AAfl 


STATUTORY CHARGES. 






Ami Cert Col Tax Title 


00 


OA AAA 
^U.UUU 


Cun"ent Year Overlay 


U UU 


7nA AAA 

/UU UUU 


Retirement Contnbutions 


00 


1 "SQI TOR 


County Retirement Tax 


n 00 


HH 000 


Offset Items 


000 


38,554 


Special Education 


000 


11,024 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 


00 


447 341 


MArU (un.ooo oi lyoJ) 


n 00 


A Q'lQ 


excise 1 ax ((Jn /z/oiiyt)^j 


00 

U Uv 


ft 990 


Metro Air roi uoni uisi 


00 


S 7ftfi 
J, 1 00 


Mosquito Control Program 


00 
uuu 


■^0 O'^l 

jU.UJ I 


M-W R A Sewef Assessment 


U UU 


1 AH7 AOH 


School Choice 


no 

U UU 


00 
U UU 


Cnaner bchools 


00 

U UU 


00 
U UU 


Cnminal Justice Training 


00 

U UU 


T fiOO 
J.DUU 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 


0.00 


4.1 jJ.nb 


CAPITAL OUTLAY: 






Polce Dept Cruisers 


00 


107 420 


PoSce Dept Mobile Data System 


g/ UoZ 00 


Kin 

31 lU 


Fire Dept Fire Alarm Truck Equip 


n no 

U UU 


OQ AAA 
Id uuu 


Pubic Works One Ton Dump Truck 


U UU 


JJ.lDO 


Pubfcc Works Bucket Tnjck 


n nn 
U UU 


U.A 7G1 

04 /yi 


Pubic Works Snow Pbws (2) 


A AA 

U UU 


1Q AAA 

ly UUU 


Pubic Works Soccer Field 


00 
U UU 


91^ 000 
C lU UUU 


ruuic worKs olo oysiem 


00 
u.uu 


40 000 
*»u.uuu 


Pubic Works Oil Separator 


00 

u.uu 


7 000 

/.yuu 


Pubic Works Granite Monument 


00 

u.uu 


nC. AAA 

to.UUU 


Pubic Works No Wifrn Parking Area 


00 
u,uu 


32 000 


Pi iKt^ DitiLHrnnc Won Tn ir'L 


00 


20 760 


Piihlr RiiiLHinnc Pifkiin Tnirk 


000 


14,035 


Pubic Buildings ADA Complance 


4.606 08 


000 


Pubic Buildings Histoncal Renovations 


5,660 86 


000 


Pubic Buildings West Schoohouse 


2,767 92 


00 


School Dept Wobum St. Roof Repai 


7.185 00 


000 


School Dept Burner Replacement 


5,435 39 


00 


School Depl Fire Alarm Upgrade 


35.009 17 


00 


School Dept Minivan 


000 


26 634 


School Dept Roof Repairs 


00 


97 600 


School Dept Building Renovations 


00 


00 


School Depl Window Replacement 


5.718 88 


10.000 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 


133.416 15 


814,048 



1 KANoPCK & 




AMT CFWD TO 






CAr cni^i 1 unco 




FY 2001 FRO 




FISCAL 2000 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


1 000 00 

1 ,UUU UU 


U Uv 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


00 

U.uu 


13,900 00 


13.900 00 


000 


000 


000 


19 000 00 

1 t.UuU UU 


in nfi9 "in 


1 937 50 


000 


1 .00/ oU 


10 000 00 

lU.UvU Uu 


1(1 (Wl (VI 

lU.UUv Uv 


000 


000 


00 

u.uu 


OS AAA no 

tJ.UUU UU 


5 022 52 


46,594 27 


46.594 27 


00 

UUU 


lOfi S97 00 


00 


106.527 00 


000 


lOfi *^97 00 

lUU. j£/ UU 


1 "^0 00 


00 


130,439 00 


000 


no i'^Q 00 

tOU.tOo UU 


TO 010 00 

OJD,\J 1 U. UU 




82,938 06 


600 00 


09 -i-ao AC 


J. 1 t*t. It J OJ 


J, 1 H4. 1 1 J. 30 


221,847 87 


221.847 87 


00 

u.uu 


A 17Q A'iC 71 

4,i/y,yjb n 


"3 07*3 AAO 11 
J.O/O.UU^ z1 


664 OSfi 77 




OOA CIO 71 


OA AAA AA 

ZU UUU UU 


0,0/ J oy 


11 326 11 


00 


1 1 326 1 1 


7Ai'l AAA AA 

/UU UUU UU 


A AA 
U UU 


700 000 00 


00 


7AA AAA AA 

/UU.UUU uo 


l.JJl OZj UU 


1 '3'31 "30*^ AA 
I.Jjl.J^J UU 


00 


00 


A AA 

u.uu 


AA QCQ AA 
44.000 UU 


'3'3 C*i1 AA 
JO, DDI UU 


11.217 00 


00 


11 Tl7 AA 

11, zi/ UU 


38,473 00 


000 


38 473 00 


000 


38,473 00 


5,798 00 


1,443 00 


4,355 00 


00 


4,355 00 


A'^Ci AAf\ 00 

*40U,'*'tU UU 


497 "^1 1 00 

4t/ , J 1 1 UU 


3.135 00 


000 


I'^f 00 

0, lOo.UU 


4.882 00 


4,882.00 


000 


000 


000 


1 9 "^fiO 00 

li.JUU UU 


IS Q40 00 

10. j*IU UU 


(3,580 00) 


000 


/I '^A0 00^ 
^0,OOU UUJ 


'^ *\A'^ 00 
J DUO UU 


^ '^OT 00 
J. jUJ UU 


000 


000 


00 
U UU 


iQ 91"^ 00 


S9 1 ifi 00 

OZ, IHO UU 


(2,933 00) 


00 


n Q11 001 
^t.yoo uuj 


1 "^Qi lOfi 00 

I.OJH, lUv UU 


1 "^04 lOfi 00 

1 .03**, (Uw UU 


000 


000 


00 

U UU 


00 

U UU 


i ft09 00 

•♦.OUt UU 


(4,802 00) 


000 


(A AA9 0C\\ 

\H,0\JL UUJ 


9 9*^0 00 

CC-JX) UU 


ft 790 00 

0, / ZU UU 


(6,470 00) 


000 


/fi AlO 001 
^U,*l/ U UUJ 


-3 fiOO 00 

O.UUU UU 


■3 fiOO 00 

O.OUU UU 


000 


000 


00 

U UU 


A A<I1 QOj( AA 

4,U4^.o^4 UU 


"3 OOO 1A0 QO 

o.^y^.TUz tjy 


7'i(l 791 11 
' JU. t c \ 11 


00 


7CA 7T1 1 1 

/DU / Zl 11 


1A7 jIOA AA 

1U/,4ZU UU 


1A7 >nA AA 

lU/ 4^U UU 


00 


00 


00 


C4 ciA AA 

D 1 . 1 U UU 


1 1o.D4z 00 


00 


00 


00 


HQ AAA ATi 

^ly UUU UU 


A AA 
U UU 


29 000 00 


29 000 00 


00 


jj ^yo UU 


■3-3 OQQ AA 

00, ifyo UU 


00 


00 


00 


Oi 7Q1 AA 
04 , / y 1 UU 


Qi( 1Q1 AA 

04, ly 1 UU 


600 00 


00 


CAA AA 

bUU UU 


1Q 000 OA 
1 3 UUU UU 


IQ 000 00 

ly.uuu UU 


00 


00 


A AA 
U UU 


9 1 ^ 000 OA 
£, 1 J.UUU UU 


90*; "3^1 £;'3 

tUu.OO 1 00 


9.668 47 


9.668 47 


A AA 
U UU 


AO 000 00 
'tU.UUU UU 


9^ Qii! OA 
£J,3 1*1 UU 


14.086 00 


14.086 00 


A AA 
U UU 


7 QOO 00 

1 , 3UU UU 


7 1R1 *iO 

f , 1 1 OU 


718 50 


00 


71 A (^A 
/ 10 oU 


9S 000 00 

^J.UUU UU 


17 Qft9 S*! 

1 1 , 30Z . JO 


7 017 45 


7.017 45 


OA 
U UU 


■59 000 00 

.uuu.uu 


00 


32,000 00 


32.000 00 


n 00 

U UU 


90 7fiO 00 

CM. 1 OU UU 


90 7fi0 00 

tU, / DU UU 


U UU 


n An 
U UU 


A AA 
U UU 


14.035 00 


14,035 00 


00 


000 


000 


00 


-3 fi9Q 7-3 


976 35 


976 35 


00 

u.uu 


000 


5,660 86 


000 


0.00 


000 


000 


900 10 


1.867 82 


1,867.82 


0.00 


000 


4.51252 


2,672 48 


2.67248 


000 


6.000 00 


11435 39 


000 


00 


000 


0,00 


7 284 25 


27.724 92 


27.724 92 


000 


29,826 00 


29 826 00 


00 


00 


000 


97 600 00 


97 600 00 


00 


00 


000 


84 750 00 


33 148 82 


51 601 18 


51.601 18 


000 


10.000 00 


15.718 88 


00 


000 


000 


907.990 00 


863.472 98 


177 933 17 


176.614 57 


1.318 50 



-32- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 2000 





AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 






AMT CFWD TO 






FY 2000 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES 




FY 2001 FRO 


CLOSING 




FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 2000 






BALANCE 


FISCAL 2000 


BALANCE 


WARRANT ARTICLES: 
















Memonal DayA/eterans Day 


000 


5 000 


5000 00 


1 581 10 


3 418 90 


1,020 09 


2 398 81 


Lease Quarters-Mannes VFW, Legion 


00 


2.250 


2 250 00 


2 250 00 


000 


00 


000 


Street Acceptance 


00 


300 


300 00 


300 00 


000 


000 


000 


Senior Tax Rebate Program 


9.897 50 


10 000 


10.000 00 


6 935 00 


12.962 50 


12.962 50 


000 


Sewer Master Plan 


29,984 02 


00 


000 


28 515 02 


1 469 00 


1.469 00 


000 


Master Plan Study 


30.000 00 


OOO 


000 


14.663 32 


15.336 68 


15.336 68 


000 


Land Purchase 


292.400 00 


000 


000 


000 


292 400 00 


292.400 00 


00 


Facilties Development Program 


OOO 


20.000 


20.000 00 


000 


20.000 00 


20.000 00 


000 


Warrant Articles Subtotal 


362.281 52 


37.550 


37.550 00 


54.244 44 


345.587 08 


343,188 27 


2.39881 


TOTAL 


1.762.806 13 


45.926.175 


46.616,576 54 


44 373 090 30 


4 006.292 37 


2.646.102 24 


1.360 190 13 



-33 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 



REVENUES: 

WATER RECEIVABLES RATES 

WATER RECEIVABLES SERVICES 

WATER RECEIVABLES INDUSTRIAL 

WATER RECEIVABLES CONNECTIONS 

WATER RECEIVABLES FIRE PROT, 

WATER RECEIVABLES CROSS CONN. 

WATER LIENS 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

MISCELLANEOUS 
REIMBURSEMENTS 

TOTAL REVENUE: 

OPERATING COSTS 
TOTAL OPERATING COSTS: 

EXCESS REVENUES OVER OPERATING COSTS 

TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND FOR 
DEBT SERVICE, EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 
AND ALLOCATED CHARGES 

EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES AND 
TRANSFERS OVER REVENUES 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING 

FUND BALANCE TRANSFERS 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - ENDING 



ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL 



1998 


1999 


2000 


2,678,239.24 


2,663,092.70 


2,973,787.16 


14,168,30 


18,923.31 


12,080.22 


11,556.95 


26,911.56 


10,979.23 


81,777.10 


83,147.50 


58,950.00 


38,655.38 


40,870.53 


43,567.30 


22,575.00 


28,175.00 


26,845.00 


132,336.53 


122,129.99 


118,444.78 


1,630.54 


4,205.34 


1,238.84 


16,763.56 


25,873.96 


36,926.25 


CO ceo oo 
02,662.28 


O AAA AA 

3,000.00 


0.00 


3 050 364 88 


3 016 329 89 




1,701,815.59 


2,091,832.00 


2,084,018.29 


1,701,815.59 


2,091,832.00 


2,084,018.29 


1,348,549.29 


924,497.89 


1,198,800.49 


650,693.00 


456,552.00 


459,005.00 


697,856.29 


467,945.89 


739,795.49 


1,236,063.35 


1,933,919.64 


2,401,865.53 


0.00 


0.00 


(1,070,218.44) 



1,933,919.64 2,401,865.53 2,071,442.58 



-34- 



CO 



3 UJ 

X > 

< o: 

</3 LL 



o z 



CO 






LU 






o 






■z. 






< 






_» 




o 


< 




o 


CD 




o 

CNJ 


Q 




:^ 


Q 


O 


FUl 


UN 


E3 


z 


U- 


z 




CO 




CO 


\— 




LU 


o 


Q 


O 


LU 


LU 




ROJ 


Q 


HA 


Z 
LU 


o 


Q. 


CC 


Q 


TAL 


< 




LU 


< 




> 


CO 
LU 


CA 


HE 


cr 




z> 




cr 






o 


5 




LL 


z 






LU 
CL 






X 







=) 
o 



o =^ C;! 
^ 5 ^ 

CO CD 



O 

CO =5 
LU O 



X 

CO 

< 

X 

CO 



cc (O 
LU 05 



!_> 

cr 



o 
o 



ER 


o 
z 




§ 


cc 




SE 


LU 


9? 


LU 


cs 


OO 


z 




CO 


o 




t — 


Z 




cc 


LU 





8 

o 



8 



8 



8 



8 



^ CM 



■■— OO 



CO LU to 



CC 
O 



LU O 



o 
o 



< 

t5 



0) CO 

3 LU 

c cc 

> 2 

CC Q 



& 1 



X± in 



o> ° Q- 



Ll- (1) 

0) 3 
:£ -Si 



(0 ^ _ 



LL <n tj) 

lis 



I ;2 9- 



< 
CD 
Q 



3 
< 



-35 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2000 





YEAR 


YEAR 




PRINCIPAL 


OUTSTANDING 


BOND 


BOND 


OUTSTANDING 


DESCRIPTION 


ISSUE 


DUE 


RATE 


AMOUNT 


JUNE 30, 1999 


ADDITIONS 


RETIREMENTS 


JUNE 30, 2000 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Sewer - Main Street 


11-90 


11-01 


6.8-6.85 


745,000 


145,000 





75,000 


70,000 


School Boilers 


11-90 


11-00 


6.8-6.85 


852,500 


90,000 





90,000 





Sewer-MWRA Loan 


06-95 


05-00 





103,500 


20,700 





20,700 





Dept.Equipment-Fire 


06-95 


06-00 


5.1 


230,000 


45,000 





45,000 





Judgement Loan 


08-96 


08-02 


4.9 


1,125,000 


675,000 





225,000 


450,000 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 








3,056,000 


975,700 





455,700 


520,000 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Water Standpipe 


11-90 


11-01 


6.8-8.85 


1.425,000 


290,000 





135,000 


155,000 


TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 








1,425,000 


290,000 





135,000 


155,000 


TOTAL DEBT 








4,481,000 


1,265,700 





590,700 


675,000 



SCO CNJ I — CM 

C\J T— »- — 



< 

o 



CD 
< 
Q 

m 

Q- 
X 
LU 



< O 



CSl T— 



o 



^ CO CD CO f" — 0> 
O ^ 1^ ro CM 



O C7> CO ^ 

CO ~ 



O CNJ h-- 
cg CO oo 



^ to 



OS n 
cn CM 
oo oo 



LO CD -o- 
a> CD T— o CO 
^ ^ in ^ en 



ir)cD<T)-»— ocMC7>CT)ir)r^(^co 
h^ocooococor^-*— T— ^co<j> 
CMT-cooocor — CD CO oo CD 



CO n T— CO oo 



CD 



CO CO CM 

CM CT) CM 

<o CM r-^ cn CO 

CM CO CO CD CM 

CTJ T CM CO oo 



cooj^-^^r^^^ooocof — o>h^cM<oir>oo>co 
<^oquocT>CMcoci)0^r~-cocM^o»<oeo^r~'r-co 
■^cococo-^'cDiricDCTi^cDCNicTicTiirih^cTicoc^^' 
CNjr— «— r-^cotor-^ocooococoh^^-'— cocj^rroo 

COOOCDCDLOOCMt— COOOCOf^CJl-^ CO CO CD CO ^ 

^ co' crT CO CO CO ^ co" oo ^ co ^ 

oo CO CNJ T— »- CO o 





oo 
o 


o 

o 


o 


UD 


-a- 


CJ> 
CM 


o 

CO 


o 
o 


CM 


o> 
1^ 


cn 


oo 
irs 

CM 


CO 
lO 


oo 

CM 


CO 
CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


•«T 

OO 


O 
to 


o 
o 




CO 
CO 
CO 


124,1 




co" 
CM 


o" 
to 


co" 


co" 




■^" 


■t" 




co" 

OO 

•«J-_ 


CT> 

r-^ 


oo 

o 


O 

o 


o 


ID 


r--. 


ST 

CM 


o 

CO 


o 
o 


Ol 


CM 


CD 

C!D 


od 
ir> 

CM 


d 
cn 


oo 

CM 


CD 

CO 

CO 


CD 
CO 


s 


o 


<=> 
o 

CT> 




CO 

■V 

CM 


124,1 




co" 


o" 

CO 


CO 


co" 


£2. 


to_ 
•<t" 


•^" 




o" 
o 



OOOOOOCDOr^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCDOOOO 

oooooooocpooooocpooo 
oo<o<z> CNir^ CNJO 

iDCMiXJO^ COCNJ <Z) 

CO CO to 



CO 



_J 2: 

< q: 
9 < 



is 



^ =i 1^ 

—I OD < 

5 ^ ^ 

=■ Q q: 

ii; ^ 

O Hi 

:t Q- 1 

§ X s 



m O 

X w 
O Z) 



LU 
CL 
X 
LU 

CO 



< 

Od 



t- o 
CO o 

z 

crt 
t— 

CO 
LU 

o 

LU 
CO 



< 
I— 

O 
(— 

LU 

2? I 
°" I 

UJ X 
... 



O LU 

< X 

_J UJ 

CO ^ 



CO C£) 
O CO 
CNJ oo 



OC^OCDOLOOOOOOOOOOCDCDU^OCDCDCDOOOOOOOOCNJCTJO^Or^ 
OOOOOCTlOOOOOCNJOOOOOrOuOOOOOOOO^OOOOrOOO'^OrO 



OOOOQO^OC^OOO'— OiiOOOOtOCMOOOOOOO^OOO'— 



uo o o u-> o 

O O " 

cm" o' 



1^ o 

to ^ o 



^ CO 

LO CO to 

O) cn -"cr 

o" to' 

O CO to 



o 



CZ) o o o o 
O CD O O O 

o o o o o 



^ CD to 

■«— CO to 



00O00OO00OOOOCDCDO0O0O0O0O000CZ30 
OOOOOOOCZJOCpOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

ooocbc:>ooocz>cz>oc3oczjocr)0<o 



ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 






CT) CT> CO CO CD (T> O 

to CO CD CO 

r-. ^ _ o_ CO o_ 

CNj" T-" CNj" 



to S 



oo CO CSJ -r- CT> 



<z> o o 



OOOOOOOOOOOlOOOOOO 
CDOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

cz)crjoc3>czicr3C2>c:r>ccjc3ococoo6cr>o<r> 

to CD CO 

•r- T- CM 



ooooooTTOOOtor-.^-*— oto 

OOOOOCOCNJC^OOOO-^OOOCD 



OOOOOOCMCDO^OOCMCDI^OCNJ 



to to CNJ CSl CNI 

to 1^ T— 
o" o" o' o 



" CO* 



CO 



to O oo to CD CT) 
TT <X? CD CT) 
to CO CD 



CO CN) ■»— LO 
COCZ>'»— COOCDOCO-^ 

CO CD CX5 " ~ ' — 



CD -r- 



CNICDCT>C7>^tOCO*-Or---«— O'— 
CNJTT'*— CNJCOCNiCZ>COCNJO^C7Jr^ 

r~--torotoco^tor---cDcoCNjci>coD>fO 

<0"r— '—^COOCDCNICOCOCNJOCO-^O 
COCOCO CDOOCOCO'— 0^-'«:3-tOCOtO 

r^^co^^-^cO'— CD'^ ^ to ■^0'«— cdoocnit— ' 

CNICNI'— to CNJ-r-cO 



oo CO O CD OO 

I— OO CO r-- 

^ CD to CNJ CO 



o CD cz> oo 

CO o CO 

oo CO O ^ 

co" co" 



CNI oo to 

U-> oo CD to 

T- CD CNJ to 

CD CD CO <Z> 

cxD ^ CNJ CO r-- 



to oo CO CO CD 

r^cNJCD'— oO'^r— cor^ 

■^COr— tO'^CDtOCDCNJCO 



CNJ oo CSJ 

CO o6 CD 



tocO'— or^^o*— oo 
CD CNJ o ^ CD r-- o 
r^torotocb'^tor--CDrocNi 

CD*— ^^COOCDCNJCOCOCNI 
COCOCO CDOOOOCOt— o*— 



CO CD CO CD CO 

CO CD CO 

to CO to oo CO 



^ CNJ 



■»— CO CD ^ 

^ to 



to 



OOOOOOOOh-OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCDOOO 
CDOOOOOOOCDOOOCpCpCDCDCDCpOCDCDCDCpCDCpCpOcpOOOOOOO 

<zjcDcbcz>CDcr>tocz>r-^CDCDCDcbcbc=>ez3cz>ci>cb 
oooo CNjr-* CNJO 

tOCMtOtO OOCNI TTO 



CO o 



CL 



2 o^. 



o 



< CO ^ g 

a. 



o 

CO 

cr 

LU 

—1 

< 



o (J) m 



>- 
tr 
< 

tr ^ 
m LU 3 
— , m CD 



o 



>- 



01 
0- LU 

< I— _ 

Z CO CC 2 

q; LU < < 

-1 X X h- 

o u 00 



^ C/) 



Q. 
X 

tn ^ 

a ^ 

=> o 

X 

>- o 

CC CO 

^ a: 

O CD 



CO o 



CC CO 

X O 

O X 

CO o 

o 5 



2 o 

UJ o 

t- Q 

^- z 

LU 3 

CO [I 

< 



o 

> LU 

q: u- 

LU < 

CO CO 



CD 



< 

-J CL 
CL CO 

Z Q 
O LU 



c3 ^ 

I ^ < ^ 

m > O O 

M ^ Q O 



X 



< 
cc 



UJ O 

> 
o 

Q 

z _ 
< t- 



< 
> 

o 



LU 

Q 5 

=) Q. 

< X 

CO LU 

> o y 

o cr Q 

< q: Q 

q: < ^ 



P CO 

> Q 

> o 

sis 



< 
> 



o < 

y -I 2 

I- LU 

O CD ^ 

Q J2 

< 5} CO 



o ^ 

CL Ll_ 



^2 W CO CO 
2 _l _] _l 

^ < < < 



Q Q 

2 LU LU 
p Q Q 
cc CO CO 

o 

CL 

CO 



Z3 3 

o o 



O uL 



cc < 
O Si! 



CO 
I 

< 

o 



< 
o 



-37- 



PUBLIC SAFETY 




It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the 
operations, activities and accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department 
for the year 2000. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, five lieutenants, an 
acting lieutenant, twenty-seven fire fighters, one civilian dispatcher and one 
clerk. Fire fighters Stephen Robbins and Robert Andersen both retired this 
past year. Eric Gronemeyer and William Herrick were appointed on July 1. 

The following roster is provided: 

Fire Chief 

Daniel R. Stewart 



Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 



Lieutenants 

John Brown, Jr. 
Joseph T. McMahon 
Paul Welch 



Edmund J. Corcoran, III 

Christopher J. Nee 

Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. (Acting) 



Clerk 

Linda Abbott 



Brian D. Anderson 
George A. Anderson, Jr. 
George A. Anderson, III 
David J. Currier 
Walter R. Daley 
Gary J. Donovan 
George J. Driscoll 
David R. Feyler 
Linda S. Giles 



Fire Fighters 

Kenneth P. Gray 
Eric M. Gronemeyer 
William J. Herrick, Jr. 
Richard J. Hughes 
Andrew W. Leverone 
Richard T. McClellan 
John F . McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 



Christopher G. Pozzi 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Frederick J. Ryan 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Dispatcher Supeirvisor 

Thomas W. Ceres 

Thomas Ceres is now the Supervisor of the new Central Dispatch Division. This 
group is currently in formal and on-the-job training to provide both fire and 
police dispatch functions at the new Public Safety Building. A list of the 
staff is provided below: 



Dispatchers 

Michele M. DeLeo Robert J. LaVita 

Brian T. Hermann George B. O'Connell 

April E. Kingston Darryl N. Sencabaugh 

Charleen R. Larivee Christopher H. Sullivan 



-38- 



The department responded to a total of 2,605 calls during 2000 



Residential Buildings 
Residential (Other) 
Commercial Structures 
Commercial (Other) 
Haz Mat (out of Town) 
Chimney, Fireplaces & 

Woodburning Stoves 
Vehicles 

Brush, Grass or Rubbish 
Dumps ters 



19 
5 
7 

1 


49 
48 

4 



False Alarms 

Ambulance/Rescues 

Service Calls 

Carbon Monoxide Detectors 



Out of Town Assistance 
Fire 

Ambulance /Res cue 



246 
1, 617 
450 
17 



147 
66 
81 



Estimated value of property endangered was $8,080,900 
$423, 700 . 

The following is a list of permits issued: 



Estimated property loss 



Black Powder 


1 


Propane 


61 


Blasting 


29 


Report 


42 


Class C Explosive 





Smoke Detector 


293 


Fire Alarm 


81 


Tank 


60 


Flammable Liquid 


13 


Miscellaneous 


3 


Oil Burner 


141 


Sprinkler 


61 


Siibpoena 


1 


Truck 





Welding 


4 


Gas Stations 









TOTAL 


790 



As required by law, all schools, public buildings, nursing homes and flammable 
storage facilities were inspected by the Fire Prevention Bureau under the 
direction of Lieutenant Christopher Nee and Lieutenant Daniel Hurley. Other 
inspections listed below: 



New Residential Plans Review 

New Residential Fire Inspections 

New Industrial Plans Review 

Fire Inspection Industrial/Commercial 

Underground Tank Removals 

Underground Tank Installations 

Oil Burner 

Propane 



137 
115 
51 
60 
21 
3 
80 
69 



Shift personnel inspected 293 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with M.G.L. Chapter 148, Section 26F. 

Classrooms at the Boutwell, 
Wildwood and Woburn Street 
Schools have been instructed on 
fire safety by fire fighters 
under the direction of Lt . Daniel 
Hurley and Lt . Joseph McMahon. 
Remaining schools will be visited 
at the beginning of the new year. 

Fire Alarm Superintendent Lt . 
Edmund Corcoran and Fire Fighter 
David Feyler have been 
extensively involved in the 
design and planning for the new 
Public Safety Building. 
Preliminary re-routing of the 
alarm circuits and the purchase 
of a 10 circuit fire alarm panel 
are complete. The work continues 
on the central dispatch with a 
late winter completion date 
approaching . 

Deputy Fire Chief Edward G. Bradbury, Jn and Fire Chief Daniel R. 
Stewart take part in the Memorial Day Festivities. 




•39- 



Two hundred seven master boxes, sixteen street boxes and approximately twenty- 
five miles of wire currently make up the municipal fire alarm system. All 
circuits and boxes are in good working order and repairs due to storm or 
accidents have been corrected. 

A long range plan to replace some of the aging fire alarm wire has begun and in 
2 000 the following were completed: 

3,850' "C" wire on Concord Street 

4,344' "C" wire on Shawsheen Avenue 

1,100' "C" wire on Boutwell Street 

900' Figure 8 on Church Street 

New fire alarm boxes added to the system are as follows: 

25 Wilmington Middle School, 22 Carter Lane 

2113 Arrow Paper, 1 Milton Way 

3229 Square One Mall, 1 Lowell Street 

6111 Elias Market, 381 Middlesex Avenue 

6351 PGA Realty Trust, 37 Upton Drive 

The following boxes were relocated or replaced due to extensive building 
renovations : 

47 West School, 22 Carter Lane 

2111 Diamond Crystal, 10 Burlington Avenue 

4222 Methodist Church, 87 Church Street 

6356 Lan Trucking, 250 Ballardvale Street 

6614 250 Andover Street 

In the spring of 2001, the reconstruction of Main Street from the square to 
Osco Drug will require the reconstruction and relocation of circuit one. 
Continuing into the summer months, the Avalon West project will add 8,000' of 
wire to circuit 5 from Middlesex Avenue and Salem Street to Rustic Lane 

Construction of the new Public Safety Building is nearing completion with 
occupancy scheduled for spring 2001. 

Departmental goals for the upcoming year include the completion and 
implementation of a long-range staffing plan to address needs at all levels of 
Fire Department operations. Planning for a sub-station in North Wilmington is 
on going. 

As always, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff. Assistant Town 
Manager, department heads and staff, the Board of Selectmen and the many 
organizations for their assistance during the past year. 




Sons of Italy Lodge President Michele Nortonen presents a check to Board of Selectmen Chairman Robert J. Cain for the 
purchase of tv.-o Thermal Imaging Devices for the Fire Department. Others present include, from left: Fire Chief Stewart, 
Fire Fighter George Driscoll, Sons of Italy State Vice President Kevin Caira and Chairman of the Board of Directors 
Gerald Pupa. 



-40- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year 2000. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 2000 and for the most part 
the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police Department. 
During 2000 the total number of complaints and incidents reported to the 
Police Department increased by 1,248 from 17,918 incidents in 1999 to 19,166 
during 2000. Cruisers were dispatched to 13,255 complaints and calls for 
service during 2000, an increase of 1,253 over 1999. 

Several of the more serious crime categories saw decreases during 2000. 
Breaking and entering into homes and buildings decreased by 18% from 69 
incidents in 1999 to 56 during 2000. The number of armed robberies decreased 
from 8 complaints during 1999 to 3 during 2000. Larcenies were reduced from 
262 during 1999 to 248 incidents in 2000. Reported rapes dropped from 8 
during 1999 to 3 in 2000. Other sex related crimes also dropped during 2000, 
from 14 in 1999 to 9 for 2000. 

On the other hand some crime categories increased such as assault and 
batteries, which increased from 54 in the prior year to 59 during 2000. Motor 
vehicles stolen in Wilmington increased by 11 over 1999 to 37 vehicles taken 
during 2000. This jump reflects a healthy economy indicated by the 
overflowing parking lots in our industrial areas. Drug offenses doubled from 
25 last year to 51 for 2000. Fortunately, domestic incidents dropped 
dramatically from 253 in the prior year to 209 for 2000. 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continue to be a serious 
community problem. During 2000 the Police Department experienced a 6% 
increase in motor vehicle accidents, reflecting an increase of 51 accidents 
over the previous year. In 2000 accidents totaled 823 as compared to 772 for 
1999. The department continued it's high priority on the enforcement of motor 
vehicle violations during the year. Officers cited 5,337 motor vehicle 
violations during the year. The following are the totals for some of the 
major areas of concern, speeding violations 1,963, operators' license 
violations 322, unregistered and uninsured 189 and miscellaneous violations 
2,073. Arrests for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol 
increased slightly to 85 from 83 in 1999. 

Arrests for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 2000 totaled 450, 
an increase of 20 arrests over 1999. The Police Department continues to place 
a high priority on alcohol and drug related offenses. Arrests for liquor law 
violations more than doubled from 29 in 1999 to 52 incidents during 2000. 
Narcotics arrests nearly doubled from 29 in 1999 to 52 arrests during 2000. 
In addition to motor vehicle and other criminal arrests, the department placed 
190 persons under protective custody. The Police Department, during 2000, 
took a grand total of 853 persons into custody. 

In 2000 the department completed its sixth year of implementation of the 
community policing philosophy. While this is a long-term process and requires 
significant changes in attitudes and expectation by both the police officers 
and the community, we have made substantial progress. During 2000 the 
neighborhood officers responded to and followed-up on several hundred problem 
solving assignments in their neighborhoods. In many of these cases they were 
effective in eliminating the problems and in doing so they have significantly 
reduced the number of repeat calls for those problems. 

During 2000 all officers received additional training in problem solving 
techniques. Specialized training was also given to officers concerning the 
unique problems of the elderly in today's society. In 2000 the department 
deployed bicycle patrols during the Fourth of July activities and throughout 
the summer in the Silver Lake area and shopping centers on weekends and 
holidays. The department believes that these patrols were very effective in 



-41- 



reducing habitual problems in those areas. Ba 
the bike officers are welcome additions to the 
the department deployed a community policing t 
the holiday season. The trailer was obtained 
grants at no cost to the taxpayers. The trail 
the officers to dispense bicycle helmets to ch 
safety seats to parents along with expert inst 
various automobiles. The department sincerely 
Corporation, owners of the plaza, for their wi 
trailer . 



sed upon comments by residents, 

force. During December 2000, 
railer at Wilmington Plaza for 
through community policing 
er also provided a location for 
ildren as well as provide child 
allation of the safety seats in 

thanks the DeMoulas 
lling accommodation of our 



In 2001 with the opening of our new public safety facility, the department 
will be conducting additional Citizens Police Academies, where residents will 
be provided insight into how and why the Police Department operates as it 
does. Subject areas will include department policies and procedures in areas 
of interest such as use of force, motor vehicle pursuits, citizen complaints 
and drunk driving enforcement, the elements of crimes which must exist before 
an arrest or prosecution is made, domestic violence issues and much more. 

As part of our planning for the future, the department, working closely with 
the community, will review the role of the professional police officer in 
today's society as well as review how the available resources of the 
department can be more effectively used to address the future problems of the 
community . 

The following is a Departmental Roster of the Neighborhood Officers and their 
assignments . 

Wilmington Police Department 
Community Policing 
Neighborhood Assignments 

Supervisor Area 1 Sergeant David Axelrod 



lA. Officer John Tully 
IC. Officer Paul Chalifour 



IB. Officer David Bradbury 
ID. Officer Brian Gillis 



Supervisor Area 2 Sergeant J. Christopher Neville 



2A. 
2C. 
2E. 



3A. 
3C. 



Officer Paul Krzeminski 
Officer Christopher Dindo 
Officer Patrick Nally 



2B. Officer Richard DiPerri 
2D. Officer Francis Hancock 



Supervisor Area 3 Sergeant Michael Begonis 



Officer Scott Sencabaugh 
Officer David McCue, Jr. 



3B. Officer Stephen Mauriello 
3D. Officer Thomas McConologue 



Supervisor Area 4 Sergeant Charles Fiore 



4A. Officer Paul Jepson 

4C. Officer Louis Martignetti 



4B. Officer Brian Moon 
4D. Officer Brian Pupa 



Supervisor Area 5 Sergeant Joseph Desmond 



5A. Officer Ronald Alpers 
5C. Officer Anthony Fiore 



5B . Officer Steven LaRivee 
5D. Officer Jon Shepard 



Business and Commercial Areas 
Lieutenant Robert Spencer 



Area 
Area 
Area 



Det . Thomas Miller 
Det . Patrick King 
Det. John Bossi 



Area 2 : Det . David Sugrue 

Area 4 : Det . James White 



-42- 



other members of the department include 
Deputy Chief Bernard Nally, Lieutenant 
Robert Richter, Sergeant David McCue, 
Dare Officer Chester Bruce, Patrolman 
Joseph Harris, Patrolman Julie Lambert, 
Patrolman Daniel Murray, Patrolman Eric 
Palmer, Patrolman Michael Wandell, 
Prosecutor James Peterson, Safety 
Officer Robert Shelley, Police 
Clerk/Matrons Beth Lessard and Dawn 
Naimo, Dispatcher Supervisor Thomas 
Ceres and Dispatchers April Kingston, 
Charleen LaRivee, George O'Connell, 
Michele DeLeo, Robert LaVita, Brian 
Hermann, Christopher Sullivan and 
Darryl Sencabaugh. 

Construction continued through the year 
on the new Public Safety Building, 
which is projected to open in the 
spring of 2001. The new facility will 
accommodate the Police and Fire 
Departments and a combined public 
safety dispatch center. 

The department makes note of personnel 
changes during 2000. Sergeant William 
Gable, a specialist in communications 
and computers, and Officer Lawrence 
Redding, the Department Firearms 
Instructor, retired after many 
effective years with the department. 
Both men will be deeply missed. Two 
new officers were hired to fill 
vacancies. Patrolmen Eric Palmer and 
Daniel Murray joined Patrolman Michael 
Wandell at the Basic Recruit Academy 
held at the Reading Police Training 
Center. All three officers graduated 
in December. 




Members of the Police Department took part in the 
Special Olympics Torch Run on June 9, 2000 from Lowell 
to Boston. Chief Bobby N. Stewart passes the torch to 
Sergeant Joseph Desmond. 



In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all boards and committees and all department heads and employees 
for their support and cooperation during the past year, indeed the past 21 
years. This is my final annual report to the residents of Wilmington after 
serving as your Chief of Police for 21 years. Together we have shared many 
good times and a few not so good times. As Chief, I strove to do what was 
best for the department and the Town of Wilmington. There have been many 
changes over the years in the town as well as the department. As the town has 
grown in population and its commercial base expanded, the department has faced 
increasing demands for service. With the backing of the taxpayers we have 
also grown to meet those demands. The new public safety building will be a 
great asset to the town and go a long way toward meeting the physical needs of 
both the Police and Fire Departments. 

A special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police 
Department, for without their support and continuing efforts none of our 
accomplishments could have been realized. I am proud to have had the 
opportunity to lead such a great group of men and women for the past 21 years. 



-43- 



Wilmington Police Department Statistics, Year 2 000 



ADDT7QTQ • 




QFY PRTMPC;- 




Ait son 


1 


Rape 


1 


ii. C>L U. ^ vX i-J CL ^ t_ ^ y 


35 


Indecent Exposure 


3 


D ±. vZI C* Jv -L i-l^ uC LJ 1 X t_ ^ J_ -L. ^-^^ 




Indecent A&B 


3 


D "i CI OT"H T" "1 V 
u u. o w J- J- J. y 


1 


Other 


2 


Gamb 1 i na 





TOTAL SEX CRIMES : 


~9 




15 






T yr' ^T\\/ Mo1~ o t* V^Vi "i r* "I 


3 


MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS • 

1 1 W X XV V Xlil 1 X. V XJ X_J V X. \-/ Uc\ X X v^L^ O ■ 




T . "i (Tl 1 O T" T 1 ^ \a7 Q 
J_l X LI W i. JJCLWO 


3 9 


Seat Bp! t 


o / ^ 


lid J. i J. Li. O CI 11 Id ^ ^ 


6 


Usina W"i t"hni]t" Aiit'hoT'i t"v 

\J 1^ .X X X^H f 1 J. X Xn.^ V.X \^ £^ \JL \^ XX v./ X -L ^ y 


1 


Ml 1 T*H P> T" 





Til r'enc!f=» V"i o1 on q 

XJ X \^ O ^ V X W X d X \J i.LO 


^ ^ ^ 


MaTT'ot" 1 r* ^ 


52 


Fin H r5 Tier T" "i ncr 

XJ xxv^ g.xx>-*] \^ X -t- X x*— j 


14 







XJC^dVXllM O vZT i i vZ. IrX W vZ. X L. V X^dlllCLM C 


X Vj 




3 


One Tat" i na IJndpT Tnf^l iipncR 

far X. d ^ X X^H XXVX^v X X. XX J_ J. LX V_> XX V^r 


85 


p f:^ ("« -J T/ -i ri cr ^t"o'lf=*n PTTinf^Tt" V 

^ X V X i"!-^ o L. w X G 11 c X G X L« y 


6 


Tin Tecfi c;i-<:ar*eri / Tin "i n cii i yf^c^ 

W XX X ^ X O ^ X VX / WXXXXXO LX X ^x 


189 


P ohVl^ T"'\/ 


1 


w 


1,963 


*^^V O "F "F n «5 

\^ ./V J_ J_ dl O o 


1 


Other 


2,073 


iTuven lie 





TOTAL VIOLATIONS : 


5,337 


other 


284 






TOTAL : 


453 


CITATIONS ISSUED: 








Warn i na"? 

■ V X X X X. X X^^ 


2,282 


PROTECTIVE CUSTODY : 




Complaints 


97 






Non - Criminal 


1,213 


Ages : 




Arrests 


213 


11/12 





TOTAL CITATIONS • 

X \J X ' ' X X X X ■ 


3,805 


13 /14 


4 






15 


9 


CRIMES REPORTED- 

x\. X 1, id *J X\.u C \J x\. X Cj±J > 




16 


10 


TViTRa1"C2 Cif ATcion Kf Romhincr 

X XX X ^> CX ^ 1^ \^ X_ X^X ^ Vi^X X UC XJ \^ 1 1 LXJ X. XX>-) 


50 


17 


14 


x^k^ ij d U. X. ^ UL X_/ C4, W _/ * 




TOTAL UNDER 1 8 • 


37 


X X- X N— ' <-X X. L 1 1 


1 






Knife 


3 


18 


25 


OthPT Wpanon 

>w'^XXv«X VV^dk^V_/XX 


6 


19 


19 


Aaar a va t ed - hand - foot 


23 


20 


12 


No weanon 





21 


10 


Simnle Assault 


26 


22 


9 


TOTAL ASSAULTS 

X V^ X X^XJ X^L-/ kJ X^\_/ X-J X laJ 


59 


23 


6 






24 


5 


BREAKING & ENTERING- 

I_> Ix. Xj/^1\. -L X>l v_J OC ^X^ X Xj X\. X. X^ VJ ■ 




25/29 


10 


By Force 


26 


30/34 


18 


No Force 


9 






At" t emnt ed 




35/39 


13 


X^ 1 I I kJ ^ ^wX 


21 


40/44 


12 


Total B&Es 


56 


45/49 


7 






50/54 


2 


ROBBERY : 




55/59 


2 


Firearm 


2 


60 & Over 


3 


Other Weapon 





TOTAL OVER 1 8 : 


153 


Strong Arm 


1 






TOTAL ROBBERIES • 

X Va/ X xl-XJ X W^XJ XJ X-JXV J_ kJ « 


3^ 


TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY • 


190 






LARCFNTFS • 




XX^ X X^X-jX>f X O x\. Xli It w XV X X-iXJ • 




Poplcf^t" P "1 pirn nrr 


■J 


aT*TTiQ T? e Q'non H eH ^"o 

/*LXdXIUO x\.C iD >^ixV_i vZ. ^ L. ^ 


1,997 




2 


T~l 1 Q 1" n T"V^a n e <5 

X^ X O IX X JM^dll^ C O 


815 


J. i_ L> -L Xl*^ 




XJ^h^L 1 O L. X ^ IT ±. WXj X dllO 


209 




7 Q 


M,k3oXoL. V^L-IICX /-i^Ciiv^XCo 


3 7 8 


1*1 /V irdl-Uo Oc i-^^ C i3 o I. XCo 


D 


X XxCo xxC tS^l^lxUCU. L.\-f 


112 


Bikes 


16 


tTuvpni 1 e Comnlaints 

W kX V X X ^ ^ Vw Nw- V.^ 1 1 t-f-/ -i- -1- X X >J 


95 


From Buildings 


42 


Missing Persons Returned 


16 


From Coin Machines 


1 


Missing Persons/Still Missing 


1 


Other 


82 


Prowlers Reported 


274 


TOTAL LARCENIES: 


248 


Miscellaneous Complaints 


15, 778 






M/V Accidents 


823 


MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN: 




Cruisers Dispatched 


13, 255 


Autos 


27 


Suicides & Attempts 


12 


Trucks Sc Buses 


5 


Sudden Deaths 


13 


Other Vehicles 


5 






TOTAL M/V THEFT: 


37 







-44- 



RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES 
Stolen Wilmington and 

Recovered Wilmington 
Stolen Wilmington and 

Recovered Out of Town 
Stolen Out of Town and 

Recovered Wilmington 
TOTAL RECOVERED: 



10 

23 

16 
49 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS: 
Restraining Orders Served 
Parking Tickets Issued 
Firearms I.D. Issued 
License To Carry Issued 
Dealer Permits Issued 
Reports to Insurance Companies 
and Attorneys 



105 
135 
112 
221 
2 

451 




New Mobile Speed Monitor - purchased by Police Deportment in 2000. 




Community Police Mobile Precinct Trailer 



-45- 




/~\/^ C* T T /"* c* ^ 

jjoys ijicenscQ 


1 7 


Complaints 


452 


Trips 


453 




9 n 


Animals Picked Up 


45 


Animals Returned to Owner 


27 


Animals Adopted 


13 


Animals Picked Up Deceased 


59 


Animals Euthanized 


3 


Animals Quarantined 


12 


Total Days for Dogs in Kennel 


185 


Pets Vaccinated at Rabies Clinic 


255 


Total Working Hours 


774 . 5 


Amount of Citations 


$180 . 00 




One of the many "clienis" attending the 
annual Rabies Clinic. 



FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE 




The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town 
and school buildings. We are responsible to ensure that facilities are 
properly cleaned and maintained for town employees, school children and 
personnel and the general public. 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
2000 : 

Routine maintenance was performed in all school and municipal buildings. 

A section of roof on the Shawsheen School was replaced above classroom area. 

Voting machines were programmed and set up for elections. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved from school to school for musical concerts 
and plays . 




New lexan 
windows were 
installed in the 
stairway at the 
side of the 
North 

Intermediate 
School . 

A fresh coat of 
paint was put on 
the South School 
located on 
Chestnut Street. 

New carpeting 
was installed in 
the conference 
room of the 
Wilmington 
Memorial 
Library . 

An additional 
office area was 



Public Buildings personnel coniinue their upkeep of the Town's buildings, including the historic created at the 

South School on Chestnut Street. High School . 



-46- 



During the summer Public Buildings employees had extensive work moving school 
material in all seven schools because of the grade configuration change plus 
the opening of the new Middle School to make for a successful school opening 
at the end of August . 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
town departments, school administration and especially all the employees of 
the Public Buildings Department for their continued help, support and 
cooperation making 2 000 a productive year. A special thanks to the Public 
Buildings employees for the extensive work that was accomplished this summer 
with the moving of all schools. 



The year 2000 was a very busy year for the Permanent Building Committee. We 
completed construction and had a successful opening of the new Middle School. 

The school has some punch list items still being completed. We are also in 
the construction phase for the new Public Safety Building, which is scheduled 
for completion in the spring of 2001. The committee meets at least once every 
month for an update from our project manager on both projects. 

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
town departments, school administration and especially the people of 
Wilmington in their support and cooperation for the completion of these much 
needed projects. 




Sreel is set and construction begins on the new Public Safety Building. 




-47- 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I, Donald N. 
Onusseit, hereby respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the 
Wilmington Department of Public Works for the year 2000. 



The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions 
Cemetery, Parks and Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. 

Highway Division (65 8-44 81) 

All regular highway 
maintenance work was 
carried out during 
the year, such as 
sweeping streets, 
installing street and 
warning signs, 
patching streets, 
cleaning catch 
basins, cutting brush 
along the roadsides, 
picking up trash 
along our roadsides, 
painting and 
replacing guardrails, 
repairing broken 
curbing, painting 
safety lines and 
crosswalks on 
streets, etc. 



Highway, Tree, 




Safety Projects: 



Public Works street cleaning in operation. 



Sidewalks : Sidewalks were constructed on Lake Street from Shawsheen Avenue to 
Grove Avenue. 

Guardrails : Guardrails were installed on Church Street across from Adelaide 
Street, Clark Street at Middlesex Avenue, Lake Street and on Wildwood Street at 
Woburn Street . 

Roadway Projects: 

The following roadway projects were undertaken by the Department of Piiblic 
Works in 2 000: 



Bituminous Concrete Resurfacing : Chapter 90 funds from the Massachusetts 
Highway Department were used on the following projects: 



Bridge Lane 
Dobson Street 
Drury Lane 
Evans Drive 
Fay Street 
Jere Road 
Hathaway Road 
Lawrence Street 
Oakwood Road 
Veranda Avenue 



(Main Street to End) - 745 linear feet 

(Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue) - 1,402 linear feet 
(Glen Road to School Street) - 633 linear feet 
(Gunderson Road to Draper Drive) - 2,050- linear feet 
(Glen Road to Garden Avenue) - 714 linear feet 
(Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road) - 1,248 linear feet 
(Woburn Street to Evans Drive) - 3,270 linear feet 
(Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive) - 4,013 linear feet 
(Main Street to beyond Emerson Road) - 850 linear feet 
(Main Street to End) 847 linear feet (Binder Course) 



Bituminous Concrete Resurfacing : Water Department funds were used to resurface 
the following roadways, following water main replacements: 

Bond Street (Shawsheen Avenue to End) - 850 linear feet (Binder Course) 
Central Street (Middlesex Ave. to Church St.) - 575 linear feet (Binder Course) 
Corey Avenue (Canal Street to Grand Street) - 366 linear feet 



-49- 



Bituminous Concrete Resurfacing : Town (DPW) funds were used to resurface the 
following roadways: 



Nathan Road 
Senpek Road 
Truman Road 



(Senpek to End) - 1,057 linear feet 

(Wildwood Street to Nathan Road) - 280 linear feet 

(Hathaway Road to End) - 301 linear feet 



Microsurf acing : Chapter 90 funds were used for microsurf acing for the first 
time in Wilmington. The microsurf acing material consists of fine graded 
aggregates and asphalt emulsions and is a non-polluting product that improves 
pavement surfaces and skid resistance in a fast economical method. The 
following roadways were microsurf aced in 2000: 



Freeport Drive 
Heather Drive 
Lucaya Circle 
Sparhawk Drive 



(Park Street to Lucaya Circle) - 2,086 linear feet 
(Freeport Drive to North Reading line) - 1,286 linear feet 
(Freeport Drive to Heather Drive) - 2,469 linear feet 
(Park Street to Heather Drive) - 361 linear feet 



Crack Sealing : For the purposes of improved roadway maintenance, crack sealing 
was accomplished on the following roadways: 



Shawsheen Avenue 
Grace Drive 
Melody Lane 
Reed Street 
Harold Avenue 
Glen Road 
Kenwood Avenue 
Redwood Terrace 
Englewood Drive 



(Rte. 129) (Aldrich Road to Billerica) - 8,160 linear feet 
(Shawsheen Avenue to End) - 2,514 linear feet 
(Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive) 
(Shawsheen Avenue to End) - 1,090 
(Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street) 
(Middlesex Avenue to Main Street) 
(Woburn Street to End) - 1,725 linear feet 
(Kenwood Avenue to End) - 64 5 linear feet 
(Kenwood Avenue to End) - 4 55 linear feet 



- 245 linear feet 
linear feet 

- 1,312 linear feet 

- 6,870 linear feet 



Cracksealing followed by paving ; 



Lawrence Street 
Hathaway Road 
Evans Drive 
Oakwood Road 



(Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive) - 4,013 linear feet 
(Woburn Street to Evans Drive) - 3,270 linear feet 
(Gunderson Road to Draper Drive) - 2,071 linear feet 
(Main Street to End) - 850 linear feet 



Cracksealing followed by microsurf acing : 



Freeport Drive 
Heather Drive 
Lucaya Circle 
Sparhawk Drive 



(Park Street to Lucaya Circle) - 2,086 linear feet 
(Freeport Drive to No. Reading Line) - 1,286 linear feet 
(Freeport Drive to Heather Drive) - 2,469 linear feet 
(Park Street to Heather Drive) - 361 linear feet 



Drainage : Drainage improvements were installed on Church Street, Middlesex 
Avenue, Lake Street and North Street. 

School Grounds Projects: A new irrigation system was installed by DPW 
personnel on the playing fields (soccer and baseball) of the North Intermediate 
School . 



Tolal reconstruction of the soccer field at the SImw \heen School was 
completed in 2000 by DPW personnel inchidinfi hydroseeding. 



-50- 



Miscellaneous Projects: New park benches were installed at the Wildwood 
Cemetery and at the Town Common. A visitors' parking area was constructed at 
Wilmington High School adjacent to Middlesex Avenue. 



Stream Maintenance Program : We have now completed our fifth year of brook and 
stream maintenance. A crew of six college students was hired to clean, by 
hand, some of the streams and brooks throughout town. The program in 2000 
concentrated on the brooks, streams and culverts on the southern area (Chestnut 
Street) of town. The stream and brook maintenance program evolved from a joint 
effort between the Department of Public Works and the Conservation Department 
with its goal to restore the quality of the streams and brooks and reduce 
f loodinq . 

Snow & Ice Removal : The 
Highway Division recorded 
34 inches of snow for the 
winter of 1999 - 2000. 
The average snowfall is 
54 . inches . 

The DPW mechanics 
continued with the 
upgrading of the town's 
fleet of Sanders begun in 
1998, with the 
installation of central 
hydraulic systems on the 
last two of the DPW's 
fleet of six sanders . 

Tree Division (658-2809) 




The Tree Division carried 

r>r>i./ J- / ^ , , out all regular 

DPW crew saname road after a recent stonn. , ^ ^ , , 

maintenance work such as 

trimming, cutting, spraying, tree removal and tree planting. We removed 

roadside trees that were dead or interfered with public safety at numerous 

locations . 



The Town Common was illuminated again this year with Christmas lights installed 
by the Tree Division. 

Dutch Elm Disease : We removed twelve diseased Dutch Elm trees. 

Mosquito Control : The town contracts out its mosquito control program to the 
Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project, which currently provides 
services to 2 8 cities and towns throughout Middlesex and Worcester counties. 

The project's headquarters are located at 111 Otis Street, Northboro, MA. 
Tours of the headquarters or visits to field work sites may be arranged by 
calling the office in advance. Telephone (508) 393-3055. 

The CMMCP practices Integrated Mosquito Management (IMM) , blending state-of- 
the-art methods and techniques with expertise, experience and scientific 
research to provide member communities ' with modern, environmentally sound, cost 
effective mosquito control. 

As part of the effort to reduce the need for pesticides, they continue to 
expand their water management program. By cleaning clogged and overgrown 
waterways, mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands are restored and water 
quality is improved. 

BTI mosquito larvicide is used to treat areas where mosquito larvae are found. 
They routinely check known breeding sites, but also encourage the public to 
notify them of any areas they suspect could breed mosquitoes. Field crews will 
investigate all such sites and treat if needed. 



-51- 



The goal is to handle all mosquito problems with water management or 
larviciding but it is recognized that there are times when adult mosquito 
spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases, residential and 
recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or pick-up mounted 
sprayers . 

Cemetery Division (658-3901) 

All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, resetting grave markers, pouring foundations 
for monuments, etc. 



Burials 

Wilmington Residents 
Died in Wilmington 
Died Elsewhere 
Non- Residents 
Cremations 
Infants 



Receipts 



42 
69 
50 
23 

4 

188 



Interments 

Foundations 

Deeds 



$52 , 475 . 00 
2 , 794 .58 
39 . 00 

$55, 308 .58 



Reserve 



Trust Fund 



Sale of Lots 



$20,483 .00 



Perpetual Care 
Refund Reserve 
Refund Trust - 



$20,100.00 
150 . 00 
150.00 



TOTAL 



$95,591.58 



Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting 
grass, trimming shrubs, marking ballfields for baseball, softball, football, 
field hockey and soccer. All fields and parks were fertilized and brush was 
cleared from the air vents at all the town's schools. 

Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions with 
engineering related projects. 




Improvemenls were made to the Wilmington High School softball field. 



Athletic Field 
Projects : The DPW 
staff prepared 
plans and 
specifications 
with bid documents 
for the High 
School Football 
Field lighting 
project. The 
construction was 
performed by the 
town's contractor 
(Brewer Electric & 
Utilities, Inc. of 
So. Yarmouth, MA) 
for the bid price 
of $91,495, with 
electric service 
extension 
assistance by the 
Reading Municipal 
Light Department . 
The project was 
successfully 
completed in time 
for the fall 
sports season. 



Highway (Traffic) Projects : With the assistance of traffic engineering 
consultant Louis Berger & Associates, plans, specifications and bid documents 
were prepared and permitting from the Conservation Commission and Massachusetts 
Highway Department was obtained for the Salem Street/Woburn Street Intersection 
Improvement Project. This project will consist of roadway reconstruction, 
drainage improvements, sidewalks and traffic signals at the very busy 
intersection at Salem Street (Route 62) and Woburn Street. The project has 
been awarded to the low bidder (J. J. Phelan & Son of Tewksbury) for the bid of 
$23 9,63 9. Funding will be provided by a combination of Chapter 90 and town 
funds. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2001 and be 
completed by the fall. 

Planning Board and Conservation Commission: Reviewed subdivision plans and 
made recommendations to the Planning Board and inspected subdivision roadway 
construction . 

Household Rubbish Collection, Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 

The responsibility for overseeing the contract for household rubbish and 
recycling is a function of the Department of Public Works. If homeowners have 
any questions or complaints, please call the above number. 

The yardwaste recycling program continued with the recycling of brush and 
Christmas trees, in addition to the existing recycling of leaves and grass 
clippings . 

In 2000 the town collected the following amounts of trash and recyclable 
material : 



Trash Collected at Curbside 
Recyclables Collected at Curbside 
White Goods Collected at Curbside 
Yardwaste Collected at Curbside 
Yardwaste Delivered to Recycling Center 



10,142 Tons 

1,3 66 Tons 

12 8 Tons 

2 97 Tons 

2,052 Tons 



In order to make the disposal of household hazardous waste more convenient and 
accessible, the town implemented a shared Household Hazardous Waste Collection 
program with the neighboring towns of Andover, Chelmsford and North Andover. 
This new program will allow Wilmington residents to participate in the various 
collection days of the participating communities. 

In concluding my report, I would like to thank the town's various departments 
and the employees of the Department of Public Works for their support and 
cooperation during the year. I would also like to thank the Town Manager, the 
Assistant Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout 
the year. 

Water & Sewer Department (658-4711) 

Water : The Water Department had a very busy year dealing with the oxidizing 
of ammonia to nitrite in the distribution system. We took extraordinary steps 
to minimize any nitrite production and put emergency procedures in place to be 
assured that the town's drinking water supply remained safe and of high 
quality. I am happy to report that as of the end of the year nitrites are 
barely detectable throughout the town's water system. We will continue to 
aggressively monitor the situation and take all necessary steps to continue 
providing high quality water to the town. 

The department purchased a rubber tired excavator which allows us to do more 
in-house construction and maintenance work. The hiring of construction 
companies to do water main improvements and repairs is very expensive. When 
the department performs this work, we are able to control costs, quality of 
workmanship and neighborhood disruption. 

A total of 3,222 feet of water mains were installed using the town's 
workforce. Old cast iron or galvanized water mains, which were undersized, 
were replaced with 8-inch diameter cement lined ductile iron. This will 
provide an adequate water supply to all houses and provide fire protection to 
these neighborhoods . 



■53- 



The town has petitioned the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA) for 
permission to obtain an emergency water connection to the MWRA system. This 
will provide us with water in the event anything jeopardizes the Water 
Department's ability to provide the quantity or quality of water required to 
meet the town's needs. In the future, this connection could provide for an 
additional water source to meet the town's future water demands. 



The installation of emergency generators at the Salem Street and Chestnut 
Street wells have been designed and is going out to bid. We expect to have 
the generators installed and operating by the summer of 2001. The generators 
will allow us to continue pumping water if the town were to experience a 
prolonged electrical power outage. 

During the months of April and May, a comprehensive water main flushing and 
valve exercising program was performed. This program aids in removing 
sediments in the water mains, identifies which fire hydrants need repair and 
helps ensure that the water gates in the system remain in good working 
condition. Needed repairs on the identified broken hydrants and water gates 
are also performed during this time period. 



The department maintains and repairs all water mains, services, hydrants, 
valves, storage tanks, pumping stations and water treatment facilities in the 
town. In addition, the department removes the snow around all fire hydrants 
and assists the Highway Department with roadway snow removal. 



Pumping Statistics: 

Maximum Gallons Per Day 4,415,400 

Maximum Gallons Per Week 28,714,500 

Maximum Gallons Per Month 111,249,500 

Average Gallons Per Day 2,902,363 

Average Gallons Per Month 88,522,075 
Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 1,062,264,900 

Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 1,172,357,600 

Precipitation Statistics: 

Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 45.88' 

Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 50.25' 



Consumption Statistics: 

Municipal Use (Gallons) 14,038,247 

Percentage of Total Pumped 1% 

Residential Use (Gallons)* 614,834,069 

Percentage of Total Pumped 58% 

Industrial Use (Gallons) 409,664,888 

Percentage of Total Pumped 3 9% 

Total Metered Use (Gallons)** 1,038,537,204 

Percentage of Total Pumped 98% 

Unaccounted for Use (Gallons) 23,727,696 

Percentage of Total Pumped 2% 

* Residential use includes all residences and small commercial users using 
5/8-inch meters. 



The difference between water pumped and water metered represents 
unaccounted for water use and consists of water used for flushing mains, 
main breaks, fighting fires, street sweeping, etc. 



Water Distribution: 



The following new water mains were constructed in 2000: 



Water Mains Installed by Contractors 

Seneca Lane 
Fenway Street 

Avalon Oaks to Arlene Avenue 
Adelaide Street 



Length Size Hydrants 

180' 8" 1 

250' 8" 1 

840' 8" 
12 0' 6" 



-54- 



Water Mains Replaced by Town Personnel Length Size Increase Hydrants 



Powderhouse Circle 


768' 


2" 


to 


8" 


2 


Elwood Road 


600' 


2" 


to 


8" 


1 


Central Street 


580' 


2" 


to 


8" 


2 


Ferguson Road 


524 ' 


2" 


to 


8" 


1 


Bond Street 


750' 


2" 


to 


8" 


2 



Total water mains installed in 2000 were 4,474 feet of 8-inch, 120 feet of 6- 
inch. There were 11 hydrants (1 on Nathan Road for flushing purposes) and 149 
services installed in the system. 



Sewer Collection System: 



Sewer : The Route 3 8 and Middlesex Avenue sewer project has been completed and 
is available to the abutters. This sewer main will allow abutters to abandon 
any failing septic systems and connect to the town's sanitary sewer system. 
The Ipswich River flows through this area and it is important to do all that 
is possible to eliminate any environmental threat to these sensitive 
waterways . 

We are in the process of cleaning and documenting problems in the existing 
sewer infrastructure. The information provided will allow us to accurately 
set up a repair and maintenance program. The program can be implemented and 
budgeted over several years to keep the sewer system in excellent working 
condition with reasonable costs . 



The following new sewer laterals were constructed in 2000: 

Sewer Mains Installed Type Length Size 

Wisser Street Gravity 120' 8" 

Christine Drive Gravity 815' 8" 

Total sewer mains installed in 2000 were 935 feet of 8" gravity main. There 
were 13 9 sewer connections made to the system. 




HUMAN SERVICES & CONSUMER AFFAIRS 



Library 



On February 15, 2 000, the Wilmington Board of Library Trustees approved the 
library's long range plan for FY2001-Fy2005 . During 2000 the library focused 
on meeting the goals and objectives of the long-range plan which are based on 
three "service responses" - Commons, Current Topics and Titles and Lifelong 
Learning . 

In order to meet the "Commons" service response, the library identified two 
important goals. The first goal is to provide residents with "a modern 
library facility that is a welcoming and user friendly place for independent 
reading and learning, for enjoyable new learning experiences and for meeting 
and connecting with others to share common interests and ideas." Planning for 
a new library facility while trying to make the current facility as 
comfortable as possible for our patrons was a primary objective in meeting 
this goal in 2000. 

The planning of 
a new library- 
facility for 
Wilmington moved 
forward with the 
town meeting 
vote in April to 
fund a 
feasibility 
study. The 
study, expected 
to be completed 
by October 2001, 
will provide 
vital 

information 
about expansion 
options and 
design 

solutions . The 
Library Building 
Program 2 000 was 
completed during 
the summer. 
This document 
will serve as a 

guide for the architects in the planning of a modern library facility that is 
both welcoming and functional for users. 




Holiday lime at Wilmington Memorial Librun. 



New carpeting in the library's conference room, 
lot entrance to the library and more comfortabl 
general appearance and comfort level in the lib 
Library provided new bulletin boards and litera 
residents keep informed about local events and 
Buildings Department was responsible for the ca 
lot entrance and the new carpeting in the confe 
provided funding for four new blue lounge chair 
The Friends also improved the look of the libra 
decorations during the year. 



revitalization of the parking 
e lounge chairs improved the 
rary. The Friends of the 
ture display racks, which help 
resources. The Public 
rpet runner at the rear parking 
rence room. The Friends 
s in the magazine reading area, 
ry with seasonal and holiday 



The second goal that addresses the "Commons" service response focuses on 
access to local information resources and appreciation of the town's heritage. 
The library expanded its online catalog to include not only books and other 
library materials, but also information about agencies and organizations that 
serve residents of Wilmington. 



In November the library hosted its fourth annual local history program called, 
"Heritage Hunting -Gene a logy Resources in Wilmington." The panel, which 
included Kathleen Scanlon, Tovm Clerk, Kathleen Reynolds, Museum Curator, Paul 
Chalifour, local historian and author and Christina Stewart, Library Director, 
discussed where and how to find local genealogy resources. 

The service response, "Current Topics and Titles", has two major goals in the 
Library's Long Range Plan. The first goal focuses on improving residents' 
"access to current and popular materials for reading, viewing and listening 
and to programs that will enhance their leisure time, stimulate thought and 
expand their knowledge of contemporary culture and issues." The library 
continued to provide current and popular new materials in a variety of 
formats. The compact disc collection expanded by 54% and the video collection 
expanded by 33% over last year. Overall circulation increased by 5% over last 
year despite the increased reliance on the Internet as an information 
resource. Results of a survey to determine patrons' satisfaction with the 
availability of popular and current materials indicated high levels of 
satisfaction on finding materials of interest in all formats. Patrons also 
indicated that they were very satisfied with the length of time they had to 
wait for material on reserve for them. 

This goal had the generous support of the Friends of the Library who sponsored 
programs at the library that entertained as well as educated. In February, 
author Roland Merullo was the featured guest speaker whose book. Revere Beach 
Boulevard, was a favorite of many patrons. In March David Boeri, Channel Five 
news reporter and local author, returned to Wilmington for the Friends Annual 
Meeting. In April David Kruh presented a slide show that took the audience 
back in time to Boston's Scollay Square. In June author Jane Brox, discussed 
her book. Five Thousand Days Like This One, which wove a personal family 
history with the history of the Merrimack Valley. In September author Gary 
Goshgarian (writing as Gary Braver) returned for a visit to discuss his new 
biotech thriller. Elixir. In October a panel of mystery authors, "Sisters in 
Crime," shared their secrets in writing suspenseful mysteries. 

The need to improve access to library materials that specifically meet the 
interest and needs of young teens (ages 12 to 15) was identified as the second 
primary goal of the "Current Topics and Title" service response. Many new 
popular paperback titles were purchased for teens this past year. Efforts to 
improve the display of this collection in the Children's Room have begun and 
will continue with expanded shelving and comfortable seating. 

The third service response in the long-range plan, "Lifelong Learning," helps 
address the desire for self -directed personal growth and development 
opportunities . The first goal of this service response focuses on providing 
information that will enable our patrons to succeed at work, in school and in 
their personal lives. The nuts and bolts needed to address this goal are a 
qualified staff and a quality collection. The expert reference staff assisted 
independent learners of all ages by answering 17,484 reference questions in 
2000. Librarians continued the labor-intensive project of "weeding" 5,052 
items from the library's collection and selecting and processing 7,125 new 
items for our patrons to borrow. Keeping residents informed of library 
resources continued with the weekly press release in the two local newspapers. 
Reference Librarian Lori Hodgson began writing a monthly column for the 
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce newsletter. Library programs and services 
continued to be posted on the library's web site and the monthly calendar of 
events help keep patrons informed. 

Developing the love of reading in children remains a fundamental lifelong 
learning goal that was the basis of the dynamic programs and services provide 
by the Children's Department during the year. 

Funding from the "Community Partnerships for Children Grant," the Wilmington 
Arts Council, the Friends of the Library and local civic organizations enabled 
the library to present quality programs for children throughout the year. The 
Summer Reading Program, "Open Books - Open Frontiers," began on the Town 
Common with "Reader's Round-Up." Children and parents enjoyed a variety of 
special events during the summer, including a traveling tide pool, pokemon 
collecting, a pirate's life, a scavenger hunt, a musical review with the 
Boston Children's Theater and rainforest animals. The majority of parents who 
completed a survey indicated that the summer reading program helped develop 



-57- 



their child's interest in reading. The library once again supported the 
Wilmington public schools required summer reading program by purchasing 
multiple copies of the books on the required reading lists. 

The popular museum pass program, funded by the Community Fund, the Wilmington 
Arts Council, the Elementary School PACs, the Garden Club and the Friends of 
the Library, provided residents with the opportunity for cultural and 
educational enrichment as well as enjoyment. Offering passes that provide 
discount on admission improves access for more residents, especially families, 
to many wonderful museums in the Boston area. 

This past year the Children's Department began "Kids Club 2000," a new program 
series aimed at older children ages 8 to 10. The Children's Department staff 
presented book discussions and arts and crafts programs based on feedback from 
children who participated in the group. 

Since knowing how to use information technology is critical to lifelong 
learning in the 21st century, teaching patrons how to access and evaluate 
information is the focus of the third goal under lifelong learning. 
Librarians provided basic Internet instruction to 89 patrons in the weekly 
Internet classes at the library. Internet workstations were constantly in use 
with 2,818 hours logged in the calendar year. Given that the library was open 
to the public 3,071 hours, Internet workstations were in use 92 percent of the 
time . 

The Merrimack Valley Library Consortium (MVLC) implemented a new and improved 
computer system in December 2000 in all thirty member libraries. The PC based 
epixtech Horizon provides a powerful web based catalog with a variety of new 
patron services ranging from placing a reserve to renewing books online. 
Library staff did an exemplary job in learning and adjusting to the new system 
and dealing with initial implementation problems. It should be noted that 
there are many daily routine activities, seen and unseen, that are the 
foundation for all the goals and objectives of the long range plan and for the 
high standard of service for which the library staff strives on a daily basis. 

The teamwork and dedication of the library staff was put to test this past 
year as they dealt with the extended absence of two full-time co-workers due 
to injury in addition to a variety of unexpected illnesses and emergencies. 
Due to their team spirit, support and cooperation, library patrons saw no 
reduction in service delivery and only minimal reduction in number of programs 
offered. Hats off to the library staff for hanging in there with a positive 
attitude and for keeping a smile on their face whenever the going got tough. 

The generous support given by the Friends of the Library and various town 
organizations as well as ongoing assistance from the other town departments is 
gratefully acknowledged. With their continued support and a strong, healthy 
and dedicated staff, we will come closer in 2001 to realizing the vision of a 
public library that is a central resource for individual and community 
improvement and a source of civic pride. 




Musical festivities at the kick-off of the libran summer reading program, 
"Open Books — Open Frontiers." 



-58- 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Administration : 
Christina Stewart, Library Director 
Gloria Corcoran, Part-time Administrative Assistant 

Adult Services : 
Laura Hodgson, Reference and Adult Service Librarian 
Linda Callahan, Circulation Librarian 
Linda Berlik, Adult Circulation Assistant 
Theresa Boudette, Part-time Reference Librarian 
Ruth Ellen Donnelly, Meena Swaminathan, 
Part-time Library Assistants 
Amanda Barrasso, Leah DeMaggio, Lauren Giannotti, 
Sarah Hubbard, Erin McGrath, 
Part-time Library Pages 

Children's Services: 
Susan MacDonald, Children's Librarian 
Barbara Michaud, Assistant Children's Librarian 
Karen Whitfield, Children's Circulation Assistant 

Barbara Bresnahan, Part-time Library Assistant 
Elizabeth Berlik, Kristen Broussard, David Merry, 
Kathleen Neville, Maya Persuad-Dubey , 
Part-time Library Pages 

Technical Services : 
Laurel Toole, Head of Technical Services 
Anna Percuoco, Technical Services Assistant 
Gena Weaver, Technical Services Assistant 
Amanda Gustin, Part-time Library Page 

LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 2000 

Hours Open Weekly 

Winter 64 

Monday through Saturday 9-5 

Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Summer 56 

Monday through Friday 9-5 

Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 21,779 

Number New Patrons Registered 992 

Total Registered Borrowers 15,695 

Number of library visits 114,542 

Number of Items in Collection 92,996 

Books 88,192 

Books on Tape 1,055 

Compact Discs 745 

Audio Cassettes 410 

Videos 1,931 

Miscellaneous 663 

Items per capita 4.26 

Subscriptions 

Newspapers 9 

Periodicals 153 

Microfilm 4 

Museum Passes 7 



-60- 



circulation 



Circulation per capita 



Inter library Loan 

From other libraries 
To other libraries 

Reserves 

Reference and Reader's Services 

Internet Use 

Meeting Room Use 
Library use 
Community use 

Library Programs 

Children' s Programs 
Adult Programs 

Total attendance at programs 

Children's Programs 
Adult Programs 



7 .77 



2, 302 

3, 138 



234 
9 



243 
84 



6, 924 
463 



169, 127 
5, 440 

4,351 
17 , 484 
5 , 878 
243 

327 

7, 387 



The year 2 00 was a spe 
Council was established 
wonderful open house wi 
afternoon. May 21, the 
collection of artwork, 
work is from local arti 
questions and show off 
for several hours. Ref 
all. 



cial year for the Wilmington Council for the Arts. The 

in 1980 and this was our 20th year in existence. A 
th entertainment was planned for the spring. On Sunday 
Arts Center was opened to the public. The complete 
paintings and photographs was on display. All of our 
sts. The Arts Council members were there to answer 
the display. The New England Brass Quintet performed 
reshments were served and a lovely afternoon was had by 



Although our open house was the main event for year 2 000, we had many other 
happenings at the Arts Center. On February 13 the Council sponsored a poetry 
reading, "Tea and Poetry." Council member Hinda Paquette planned a reading of 
traditional and original poetry. The theme for the afternoon was, of course, 
romance! Hinda read some of her poetry, as did Anne Buzzell, a long-time 
member of the Arts Council. Also in February our oil painting teacher, Gayle 
Levee, gave an oil painting demonstration for the Arts Center. Gayle has a 
unique method of painting - she uses no turpentine. This prevents toxic 
reaction or allergies to the turpentine. All these events were free and 
opened to the public. 

In April our national award-winning artist presented her yearly exhibit of 
student work. Carolyn Latanision, from Winchester, teaches watercolor at the 
Arts Center on Mondays. Every year she presents a terrific watercolor display 
of student work. This is work from local artists who study with Carolyn at 
the Arts Center. Check this out! You could be painting like this! 

Our most popular and ambitious project was in June. This was our 2 0th Annual 
Art Show. We repeated our very successful reception on Friday night before 
the show. This event is for the artists, their families and friends. Awards 
were given out and a great deal of discussion about the artwork was exchanged. 
Everyone can enter this show, whether you work in oils, watercolor, pastels, 
pencils, sculpture or a combination of media. Ribbons and monetary prizes are 
given to the winners in each category. There is also a "Best in Show" award 
given by the Council. 

The granting process begins in the fall of the year. Notification of the 
amount to be granted is sent out to the various Arts Councils across the 
state. The details and deadlines are publicized in the local newspapers. 



■61- 



Then as the applications come in, the work begins for the Council. This year 
we received 19 applications - total requests of over $13,000. Twelve of these 
requests were granted. The Wilmington Arts Council likes to spread the grant 
monies ($6,377) over as much of the town as possible. This includes the 
Senior Center, all the schools, local concerts on the common, museum passes 
and library programs. After the grants are approved on the local level, they 
are sent to the state for further review. Eventually, reimbursements are 
given out to the recipients when their projects are finished or performances 
are completed. If your children go on a field trip, if you borrow a pass from 
the library to the Museum of Fine Arts or if you listen to a concert on the 
Common on a summer evening, chances are monies from the Arts Council helped to 
pay for these events . 

In the fall of 2000 several events took place at the Arts Center. In 
September, the North Shore Wind Quintet played a dazzling concert for the 
public. Also a watercolor demonstration was presented by Fritz Kubitz, a 
well-known painter. And in October the wonderful Kammermusik String Quartet 
played on a lovely fall afternoon, the second autumn concert they have given 
here. The Garden Club presented their popular "Festival of Trees" in 
December . 

While all these events were happening at the Arts Center, art education 
classes were going on every week. The Arts Center was fortunate to have two 
watercolor classes with Louise Anderson and Carolyn Latanision, an oil 
painting class with Gayle Levee and a new drawing class with Valerie Borgal . 
We also had several groups rehearsing weekly at the center - the Merrimack 
Valley Sweet Adelines and the North Regional Theater group. Once a month, the 
Tewksbury Piecemakers, a quilting group, made use of the center, with an old- 
fashioned quilting bee. Several piano recitals were held at the center this 
year . 

As the Wilmington Arts Council goes into the year 2001, our goals remain the 
same - to promote the Arts in Wilmington, to continue to responsibly 
administer the granting process for the Massachusetts Cultural Council and to 
make the Arts Center a cultural, educational, popular and entertaining meeting 
place for the people of Wilmington. Expanding the number of residents who 
take advantage of our programs is our biggest goal in 2001. To get the word 
out is the most difficult part of our job, therefore good publicity is one of 
our priorities. Plans are also in the works for some improvements to the 
building, such as new lighting and a little paint. One of our dreams is to 
purchase a grand piano for the Wilmington Arts Center - with a little help 
from our friends ! 

The Arts Council meets the first Wednesday of the month at 7:00 p.m. at the 
Arts Center. The meetings are open and we welcome your input. 






The Sarah D. J. 
Carter Committee 
has continued to 
bring to the 
people of 
Wilmington 
interesting and 
entertaining 
programs since 
1910. These 
programs are 
possible through 
the generosity 
of prominent 
citizen Sarah 
Carter who left 
the town a 
bequest for that 
purpose . 

A slide lecture 
entitled, 
"Norumbega Park 

and the Totem Pole Ballroom," was our 2000 program. Mr. Robert Pollock shared 
his slides and memories with a very receptive audience who also had fond 
memories of the area. 



The Town 's infonnational sign at Rotaiy Park advertises the Sarah Carter Fund 
musical presentation. 



Our 2001 program will be held on May 17. It will be a folk/pop music concert 
by the duo, "Two For The Show." Please join us at 7:30 p.m. in the High 
School Auditorium for this free concert. 

ssloe 



The Historical Commission was pleased to 
be a part of the following programs 
presented to Wilmington's residents: 
"Genealogy" sponsored by the Friends of 
the Library, "The Baldwin Apple" 
sponsored by WCTV and the "Vietnam 
Veterans ' " program organized by Gerry 
0' Reilly . 

The Historical Commission continues to 
work with surrounding communities on 
potential historic preservation issues. 

The Commission has received several 
donations; a copy of "Mrs. Swain's 
Scrapbook," a marble-top table, 18th and 
19th century clothing and newspaper 
articles and mementos of Larz Neilson. 
A beautiful display case was donated to 
the Tavern/Museum by the Friends of the 
Harnden Tavern. 

Several historic home plaques were 
presented to Wilmington homeowners who 
indicated to the Commission a desire to 
have their home display its historical 
significance . 

Memberships in the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation, Historic 
Massachusetts, American Association of 
State and Local History, American 
Association of Museums and New England 
Museum Association were renewed. 




Monument at the site of the first Baldwin Apple Tree i 
the gale of 1815. 



-63- 



The Public Buildings Department continues to work to preserve Wilmington's 
historic buildings. The Commission thanks them for distinguishing our little 
South School with its classic red paint. We also thank them for the custom- 
made storm windows on the Harnden Tavern. The Public Works Department is also 
thanked for- ground maintenance at the Tavern and West Schoolhouse. 

The Friends of the Harnden Tavern hosted two Open House Teas; one in the 
spring and one in the fall. They also held a very successful Christmas 
Social . 

The Historical Commission meets on the second Monday of the month at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Harnden Tavern. 

Col. Joshiia Harnden Tavern /Wilmington Town Museum 



Early in the year an Acquisitions Committee was established. Four volunteers 
from the Friends of the Harnden Tavern were appointed to serve on the 
committee, their purpose being the determination and realization of collection 
and acquisition needs. Among their accomplishments are several items now 
exhibited in the Victorian Parlor, including an Oriental rug, marble-top 
table, books and window treatments. For the Keeping Room, the Committee 
purchased three pewter dinner plates and a 19'^*' century dinnerware setting. 




The Historical Commission 
and Friends of the Harnden 
Tavern purchased three 
museum quality exhibit 
cases that have been and 
will continue to be used to 
showcase various artifacts. 

In cooperation with the 
Recreation Department, 
several "American Girl" tea 
parties were held at the 
Tavern/Museum. Girls aged 
four to eight years 
participated in a tour of 
the site, parlor and 
colonial games and crafts, 
as well as tea and light 
refreshments. The summer 
"Tiny Tots" program also 
participated in tours, 
games, activities and 
historical presentations 
over the course of four 
days. These activities 
brought several parents 
into the Tavern/Museum for 
the first time, revealing 
to them a part of 
Wilmington's heritage so 
valuable yet often 
overlooked. We look 
forward to continuing these 
programs with the 
Recreation Department. 



Other tours included the 
Hannah and Liam Reynolds enjoy the "On ihe Campaign Trail" monthly open houses a den 

exhibit at the Harnden Taveni and Museum. q£ Tiger Cubs and Cub 

Scouts, Middle School 
students and the Kiwanis 
Club. The latter was treated to a candlelight tour of the site decorated in 
its holiday splendor. 

The Friends of Harnden Tavern's annual "Christmas Social" was a great success 
Visitors enjoyed spice cake, cucumber sandwiches and mulled cider while 



-64- 



listening to the "historically correct" sounds of the "Barking Spiders." The 
Wilmington Garden Club graciously donated their time and efforts to decorate 
the Victorian Parlor. 



On exhibit during the year were "Wilmington's Veterans of War," showcasing the 
George Spanos photographs and many other reflective contributions from several 
of Wilmington's veterans; "On the Campaign Trail" in the spirit of the 
presidential election; an ongoing display of Revolutionary period documents 
from the Arthur T. Bond Collection; and, antique wedding dresses loaned by a 
local resident. The dresses were on exhibit during the Christmas Social and 
date from 1859-1921. 

The Museum received the Captain Larz Neilson Collection from his family. The 
collection consists of original, bound copies of the "Town Crier" and 
"Crusader" newspapers, as well as several books and personal affects of Capt . 
Neilson . 

During the last year the Historical Commission has been working on fine-tuning 
a drafted Collections Management Policy. The purpose of the policy is to 
outline the procedures to be followed when considering a gift or purchase or 
deaccessioning objects. It is the goal of the Commission to have the policy 
accepted by the end of June . 



Recreation Department 



The Recreation Department completed its 30th year with a full-time Director. 
Along with the full-time Director is a full-time Senior Clerk and a part-time 
office assistant. The department office is located in Room 8 in Town Hall. 
Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Assisting and advising the department is the Recreation Commission. This 
volunteer board, which was formed in 1953, acts in an advisory and policy 
making capacity. Members are: Jay Tighe, Chairman; William Savosik, Vice 
Chairman; Deborah Gray, Secretary; Larry Noel and Charles Burns. 
Commissioners are active in such various related groups as Master Plan 
Advisory Committee, Elks, Girl Scouts and other organizations. 

Even though the Recreation Department remains small, with only two full-time 
employees, it represents the second largest industry (leisure) in our country. 
Over 70 part-time and seasonal employees, along with many volunteers, help run 
the department's programs. The department offers, on a year-round basis, an 
ever-changing slate of activities for local citizens of all ages. 

We keep in mind the following guidelines as we plan recreation opportunities 
for the town: 

• provide opportunities for self-expression 

• offer programs which develop a sense of personal worth 

• provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 

• provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

• provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain 
amount of challenge to participants 

• teach skills in various activities that will have carryover value in later 
life 

• provide a variety of healthy and diversified programs 

• make programs as accessible as possible to all 

A local recreation survey taken several years ago provided valuable 
information and direction. Survey results showed that: a) respondents placed 
recreation as a high priority public service, b) our dependence upon user fees 
with tax support is the desired way of financing the department, c) most 
respondents participate in a recreation program, d) age groups needing more 
recreation are junior high age, middle age, then pre-school. 

Our departmental funding comes from a variety of sources . The town 
appropriated budget provides for a full-time director and clerk, a part-time 
office assistant, summer special needs program and some supplies. Program 
fees and donations heavily supplement the town funded budget. We are pleased 

-65- 



with our continued ability to offer high quality programs at very reasonable 
costs. We are able to do this because we utilize fund raising methods which 
are services too. These services are: various trips and programs, Town Hall 
Pepsi and snack machine, sale of Wilmington sweatshirts and t-shirts, sale of 
entertainment books and canoe rental . 

Volunteers, as always, play a key role in providing two dollars worth of 
service for every dollar spent. We utilize volunteers in varying capacities 
in many of our programs . They provide a valuable service and gain much 
themselves by volunteering. We also receive much help from local businesses 
and organizations. Some of these invaluable contributors are: Lions Club, 
Kiwanis, Chamber of Commerce, AFSCME Units 1 and 2, Tewksbury/ Wilmington Elks, 
Knights of Columbus, 
Wilmington Police 
Association, Council of 
Arts, Analog Devices, 
Agfa, Textron, Stelio's 
Restaurant, Video 
Paradise, Lowell 5C 
Savings, Burger King, 
Dandi -Lyons, Auxiliary 
Police, Pepsi Cola, 
DeMoulas, MASSBANK, 
Shriners, Ski Haus and 
Dunkin Donuts . We 
continue to search for 
new and innovative ways 
to generate needed funds 
to keep costs low for 
the recreation consumer. 
The Recreation 
Department is involved, 
in varying degrees, with 
other recreation 
oriented groups . In 
this capacity we serve 
as a quasi -consulting 

agency. We also loan Volleyball game al Silver Uike. 

recreation equipment and 

facilities to families and groups for various functions. We are also a handy 
information source and referral agency answering a wide variety and a large 
number of questions every day. 

Our basic programs for the year were: Various Theatre Trips, Day Trips and 
Overnight Trips, Santa's Workshop, Horribles Parade, Basketball League (WRBL) , 
Adult Gym, CPR, Aerobics, Discounts to Commercial Recreation Enterprises, 
Florida Discounts, T-Ball, Easter Egg Hunt, Summer Playgrounds, Tiny Tots, Fun 
With Music, Special Needs Summer Program, Public Beach Lifeguard Supervision, 
Canoe Rental and Clinic, Tennis Lessons, Concerts on the Common, Fishing 
Derby, Co-ed Volleyball, Free Loan of Fishing, Canoeing, Disney, Soccer, 
Aerobics, Hawaii and other VCR tapes. Video Camp, Police Association Beach 
Day, Easter Coloring Contest, Sale of Entertainment Discount Books, Special 
Needs Trips to the Shriners Rodeo and Circus, Ballroom, Latin and Swing 
Dancing Lessons, Children's Tea Parties, Top Secret Science Workshops, Kinder 
Karate, Junior Basketball, Sale of Ski Discount Books, Summer Youth Basketball 
League and Clinics, Golf Lessons, Massage for Couples, Play Gym, Letters from 
Santa, Town Park Softball Leagues, Junior and Intermediate Bowling Leagues, 
Baby Sitting Courses, Piano Lessons, Kids Craft Classes and Adult Craft 
Classes . 

We sold reduced rate tickets for: Celtics, Showcase and General Cinemas, 
Disney on Ice at FleetCenter, Barnum & Bailey Circus, Globetrotters, N.E. 
Revolution, Topsfield Fair, Big "E", Water Country, Lock Monsters, Figure 
Skating Champions On Ice, Christmas Carol, Sesame Street, Nashoba Valley Ski 
Area, Smokey Joe's Cafe, Tom Jones, Lord of the Dance, George Carlin, Bill 
Cosby, Six Flags, Statler Brothers, Charlie Prose, Grease and Flower Show. 




-66- 



Our trips continue to grow in popularity. Day trips included: Winnipesaukee 
Railroad, Pickety Place, Flower Show, Nantucket, Six Flags, Deerfield and 
Yankee Candle, Boston Duck Tours, Casino & Lobsterbake, Tall Ships, New York 
City, Cranes Beach Sand Castle Day, Red Sox, Tanglewood, and Connecticut 
Casinos (Ledyard and Mohegan Sun) . During the summer we took playground, tiny 
tots and special needs participants on many field trip excursions. Theatre 
trips included: Boston Pops, Nutcracker, Fiddler on the Roof, Peter Pan, 
Parachute Express and Chicago. Overnight trips included: Bermuda Cruise, 
Prince Edward Island, Indian Head Resort, Mackinac Island, Montreal, Atlantic 
City, Las Vegas, New York City and Mt . Washington Resort. 



We try to 
remain 

versatile and 
receptive to 
new ideas and 
trends . Due 
to changes in 
demand and 
other factors, 
we change a 
few of our 
offerings each 
year. We 
continue to 
see an 
increase in 
the number of 
participants 
in many of our 
programs 
especially 
youth 

programs . Our 
trips for 
seniors , 
adults and 

provide much needed revenue. These trips are in great demand also, 
crafts programs for children and adults continue to expand too. 




Participants in the Recreation Department 's summer programs enjoy a basketball game. 



families 
Arts and 



Some other groups that offer leisure type 
programs in Wilmington are: Little League, 
Public Library, Elderly Seirvices Department, 
Youth Hockey, Pop Warner, Figure Skating Club, 
Square Dancing, Youth Soccer, July 4th 
Committee, Council for the Arts, fraternal and 
service organizations. Scouts, Campfire Boys 
and Girls and the Ristuccia Skating Rink. 
Schools and churches round out the active 
recreation picture. The independent Youth 
Center at St. Thomas Church is a big plus for 
teens . 

The lack of commercial recreation in 
Wilmington, such as bowling centers and movie 
theaters and the lack of agencies such as 
YMCA's and Boys/Girls' Clubs stress the 
importance of town support for this department, 
especially now with a growing youth population 
and a growing demand for recreation 
opportunities . 




Locli Monster visits siiinincr playiivoiind at Town 
Hall. 



-67- 



Elderly Services 



The year 2000 has been a fun and exciting year for the Department of Elderly 
Services. The Elderly Services Department has been able to continue with its 
many programs while adding a few new exciting programs and events. 

The Department of Elderly Services provides the elderly residents, age 60 and 
older, a multitude of services. These services include: information and 
referral, care planning and management, health and wellness services, 
transportation services, education programs, counseling and advocacy and a 
medical equipment program. We are also fortunate to be able to provide a 
Senior Center, "Buzzell Senior Center," that has an environment that is 
pleasant, safe and enjoyable for the senior residents to go and communicate 
with their peers and participate in many of our daily classes and activities. 
The Senior Center is extremely active. There are approximately 350 senior 
residents a week that visit the center to enjoy: socializing, exercise 
classes, dancing classes, ceramic classes, wood shop class and art class 
(water color painting) , just to name a few. We have three new programs this 
year, our walking group, gardening group and T'ai Chi classes. 

We also are fortunate to have a town nurse who visits the center weekly to 
provide blood pressure clinics, B-12 shots, diabetic screenings and monthly 
cholesterol screenings . For seniors unable to make it to the center due to 
health ailments, she is able to make home visits. Other monthly services 
include podiatrist, hearing aid specialist, SHINE coordinator and Attorney 
Nancy Hogan - free monthly consultations to seniors in need. Volunteer 
accountants from AARP come yearly, from the first week of February through the 
last week of March, to assist elders with their taxes. A monthly "Social 
Calendar" is mailed out each month and is available at the center. This not 
only provides information about the activities at the center but also 
assistance programs, such as the senior pharmacy program, fuel assistance 
program and other types of services that are available to the elders in the 
community . 

The town has a full-time van driver to meet the transportation needs for the 
elderly in our community. Our van is equipped to handle two wheelchairs along 
with six other regular seats. We are able to transport seniors to their 
needed medical appointments (within a thirteen mile radius of Wilmington) , 
shopping and to the Senior Center. The van continues to be a vital service to 
the elders of Wilmington. There were a total of 15,076 runs that accommodated 
the seniors this year. Our full-time respite care worker further complements 
this service. She also provides needed transportation, but with one-on-one 
attention. This is specified to elders that are unable to be alone due to 
severe health conditions (cancer treatments, dialysis and dementia) and/or 
overall weakness. She is also able to do home visits to elders that are 
isolated and need regular "check-ins" to make sure they are all right. There 
were 113 unduplicated elders that received" these services - (making 637 home 
visits this year) . This position is a very vital role for the community. 

Another vital part of the Department of Elderly Services is our home delivered 
meals program. This program has provided for the year 2000 - 17,926 meals, 
which is an overall increase by approximately 30% since 1998. This program 
provides the homebound seniors of Wilmington with one hot meal five days a 
week, for the minimal cost of a dollar a meal. There are approximately 80 
meals daily Monday through Friday that are delivered to the elders. Elders 
not only rely on these meals but also the daily contact. The drivers are 
responsible to come to the Senior Center after their deliveries to give an 
update on the elders they visit. The elders and their families are assured 
that if there should be a problem during the time of the delivery the elder 
will be assisted and the families will be notified. The seniors that are able 
to get out have the opportunity to have a hot lunch at the West Intermediate 
School Congregate Site. This not only gives them the opportunity for a hot 
meal but a time to see their peers. This year 3,750 meals were served. 



-68- 



Some of the continuing specialty programs are: The "Homebound Library- 
Program" where the Senior Center was able to collaboratively work with the 
Wilmington Memorial Public Library, where volunteers deliver books, tapes and 
videos to homebound elders on a regular basis; the "Food Pantry Box" where, on 
a weekly basis, donated food collected by the Senior Center is delivered to 
the Wilmington Food Pantry to assist the needy families in our town; "Audio 
Cassette Library, " a program made possible by a donation of 77 tapes to the 
Senior Center. Listings of books along with the authors are made available to 
the seniors to borrow on a weekly basis. 

The Department of Elderly Services had it's third annual Senior Health Fair 
which was sponsored by the Board of Health and the Department of Elderly 
Services. There was information on blood pressure screenings, blood sugar 
screenings, nutritional information, osteoporosis information, skin care, 
diabetes updates and smoking cessation. Also, Minuteman Home Care and 
Wilmington Family Counseling set up informational booths to describe the 
services they provide . The response was wonderful and many found it to be 
very informative. 




Parents and youngsters enjoy a day of sledding at the Biizzell Senior Center. 



-69- 



The center was very excited to have a "Grandparent/Grandchildren Day" - which 
included a pizza lunch and a live animal presentation by Michelle's Menagerie. 
The seniors were able to share with their grandchildren where they go and meet 
their friends. The children and seniors truly enjoyed themselves. 




Grandparents Day at the Senior Center. 



Also, the Senior Center wanted to be able to give back to the community, so a 
Wilmington High School Scholarship Fund was developed. In June 2000, the 
elders presented our second annual scholarship to a high school senior of 
Wilmington High School who has an interest in social work and/or gerontology. 
The third annual fan drive collected donated fans to share with elders that 
are in need of relief from the heat. Our intent was to make sure that no 
senior went without some sort of relief from the heat. Finally, the Senior 
Center wanted to do something special for the holiday season. We had our 
third annual holiday tree called the "Giving Tree." This tree gave the 
community the opportunity to help elderly people in their town. The response 
was overwhelming. There were over 60 families and individuals who responded 
and 75 packages were given to the elderly in the community. We were fortunate 
to have Cub Scout Pack 56, run by Christina Buff a, help set up the "Giving 
Tree" and make labels for the tree. We were additionally fortunate to have 
two volunteers from the Middle School, Amy Sawyer and Olivia Chroscinski, that 
assisted the director in delivering all the presents personally to each elder. 
All seniors who received the wonderful gifts were extremely appreciative. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the following for their 
generous donations in 2000: Dunkin' Donuts for their daily supply of donuts; 
Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks for their Thanksgiving Dinner Dance that served 250 
seniors this year; Rotary for their monthly donations for financially strapped 
elders; Lions Club for their annual catered homebound meal; William Cavanaugh, 
owner of Cavanaugh' s Funeral Home, for the yearly donation of 10 popular 
magazine subscriptions; Maple Meadow Gardens for their annual Christmas Tree 
and to all the clubs and businesses who donated for raffles and give-a-ways. 

Thanks to the Town Manager, Michael Caira, and all the town department heads 
for their help and ongoing assistance. Thanks to the seniors who volunteered 
hundreds of hours visiting lonely seniors in their homes, hospitals and 
nursing homes; for the volunteers who delivered holiday catered meals to the 
home bound; and to the instructors that volunteer faithfully every week to 
instruct classes and programs. Thanks to all that made it possible for our 
third year of the "Giving Tree" to be a huge success. Lastly, thanks to all 
who gave their time and money in making the Senior Citizen Holiday Fair a 
success again this year. 



-70- 



Housing Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 24CFR 
(Code of Federal Regulations) ; Chapter 3 OB of the State Procurement Law, and 
State and Federal Code of Ethics. A five-member Board of Commissioners, 
consisting of four elected and one state appointed member, oversees the 
Authority's policies and procedures. The Executive Director is charged with 
the administration of these procedures. 

The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 72 seniors and 13 (705) families and includes 
conventional housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives 
first preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also 
services the Federal Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough housing 
for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally independently but 
who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington Housing 
Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive home 
care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently . 

There were numerous vacancies in 2000 for the Senior Housing Development. 
There were several vacancies in the low-income properties and they required 
extensive repairs. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority and its Board of Commissioners would like to 
express our appreciation to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police 
Department for responding promptly in the many life threatening situations 
that we unfortunately have. We would also like to extend our appreciation to 
the Wilmington Department of Public Works for their assistance in keeping our 
roads clear during the inclement weather. Also to Michael Caira, Town Manager 
and all the town employees who bring a better quality of living to all our 
tenants . 



Commission on Disabilities 



The Wilmington Commission on Disabilities is a commission established to 
advocate for and address the issues and concerns of the disabled community, 
their families and other interested parties. 

The Commission continues to attend conferences and training sessions, 
especially in conjunction with the Massachusetts Office on Disability and the 
Northeast Independent Living Program (NILP) . We keep abreast of new 
legislation and make sure proper authorities are also aware. 

The Commission assisted residents with concerns regarding in-home 
accessibility, housing assistance, transportation, service animals and 
independent living. The Commission responded to complaints of access issues 
in town and assisted private business with site surveys. We continue to 
survey sites and assess compliance with architectural accessibility for people 
with physical, visual, hearing or other disabilities in accordance with the 
Massachusetts Architectural Access Regulations and the federal Americans with 
Disabilities Act. 

The Commission continued our support to the library. We assisted the library 
in obtaining a new TTY telephone in order to remain in communication with 
residents who are deaf or hard of hearing. We initially provided the library 
as well as other town departments with this necessary equipment. 

We continue to have a positive relationship with the Wilmington ADA Committee 
and the Wilmington Special Needs Advisory Council. We look forward to working 
with these groups to provide essential resources and assistance for the 
disabled population. 



-71- 



Veterans' Services 

Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 
115, as amended, with strict compliance to this chapter, the rules and 
policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy veteran and his/her immediate family who have been 
subject to unforeseen needs. Final approval of benefits comes from the State 
Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Total funds expended for aid to veterans and their families for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 2000 was $3,262.78. Funds appropriated for the fiscal 
year 2001 total $10,000.00. The amount expended during the first six months 
of the fiscal year 2001 was $4,122.00, leaving a balance of $5,878.00 for the 
remainder of the fiscal year. 

Additional benefits expended by the Veterans' Affairs Administration directly 
to the veteran population in Wilmington was $1,484,055 for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 2000. This represents the amount of tax dollars not required 
to be expended for those who, because of circumstances, find it necessary to 
apply for aid. 




Memorial Day — 2000. 



-72- 



Board of Health 



The office of the Board o 
in Room 5 and the Public 
Town Hall. The Board of 
staggered three-year term 
2 000 were Chairman James 
Elizabeth (Libby) Sabounj 
Pilling Road, who served 
Williams -Vale , M.D., who 
is Gregory Erickson, R.S. 
C.E.H.T., the Public Heal 
Tobacco Control is Linda 
Davis. The secretarial s 
the Board of Appeals and 
Martiniello . 



f Health is located in the Town Hall 
Health Nurse's office is located off 
Health consists of three members appo 
s by the Town Manager. Serving on th 
Ficociello, D.D.S. of 500 Main Street 
ian, 120 Nichols Street and Eugene Kr 
as Vice Chairman for a portion of the 
replaced Mr. Kritter. The Director o 
, C.H.O. The Health Inspector is She 
th Nurse is Ann FitzGerald, R.N., the 
Kanter, R.N. , and the Animal Inspecto 
taff is shared with the Inspector of 
consists of Joan Goulet, Toni LaRivee 



at 121 Glen Road 
the foyer of the 
inted for 
e Board in year 
Vice Chairman 
itter of 11 

year and Jane 
f Public Health 
lly DelGenio, 
Director of 
r is Ellen 
Buildings and 
and Wendy 



There have be 
hazardous was 
land near the 
Environmental 
$12,000 grant 
(NACCHO) for 
informational 
organized for 
with a privat 
will continue 



en numerous environmental activities throughout year 2000. A 
te site consisting of hundreds of barrels of chemicals found on 
end of McDonald Road was cleaned up, to a great extent, by the 
Protection Agency (EPA) . The Board of Health was awarded a 
. by the National Association of City and County Health Officers 
the purpose of conducting a needs assessment and producing an 
package relative to that site. A citizens' committee was 
the McDonald Road community and steps were taken to contract 
e environmental firm to conduct the required work. This project 
into next year and is anticipated to be completed in July 2001. 



The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) began investigative work at 
the Spinazola Landfill (a/k/a the Maple Meadow Landfill Project) and work has 
begun at that site to remove hazardous waste and to start the capping of the 
solid waste landfill. This project will last for several years. The town has 
been informed that, as part of the agreement with the DEP, the landfill owners 
will pay the Town of Wilmington $100,000 for Supplemental Environmental 
Projects (SEP) , to be conducted within the town to fund specified 
environmental projects that the town will select. 

The Olin Chemical Company Site has been under continuous hazardous waste 
remediation throughout 2000. This site is the source of a major contamination 
of trivalent chromium to the subsurface groundwater. Barrels have been 
removed and major progress has been made in the clean-up of the site. It is 
expected that Olin will develop the site for commercial use under the DEP 
Brownfields Regulations. 

The Title 5 Betterment Loan Program began in 1999 and received funding again 
in 2000. The Board of Health was able to help with the repair and upgrade of 
four septic systems and one house was connected to the municipal sewer system. 
Loans totaling $48,268 were made to the homeowners which are to be repaid to 
the town through the betterment process. This was made possible by a program 
directed by DEP and the Massachusetts Environmental Trust and will continue 
into 2001 with an additional $150,000. 

The Board of Health was awarded a grant of $47,796 by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health for the continuation of the Tobacco Control 
Program. This program employs a part-time Director. In addition to community 
education, five hypnotherapy sessions for smoking cessation were held. The 
program also provides support to the efforts of maintaining smoke-free 
schools . 



The Wilmington Board of Health sponsored an article at the Annual Town Meeting 
on April 22, 2000 that would prohibit smoking in all food establishments. 
Voters supported this article and all restaurants are now 100% non-smoking in 
the Town of Wilmington. 



-73 




Our radon detection and survey program continues to provide low cost radon 
kits for the public. The residents of the Town of Wilmington have been able 
to purchase radon detection test kits (2 tests per kit) for $20.00 at the 
office of the Board of Health and receive important information for the 
reduction of radon and the associated risk of lung cancer by the radiation 
effects of radon gas. This program is ongoing and will continue into 2001. 

A new program of collecting elemental mercury for recycling was begun at the 
end of 2000. Mercury is a very toxic pollutant and recycling will safely 
remove a significant amount. Mercury containing instruments such as 
thermometers, thermostats, blood pressure cuffs and mercury switches can be 
brought to the office of the Board of Health for proper recycling. 

Environmental field activities included inspection of restaurants, retail food 
stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and schools, mobile food trucks, 
ice cream trucks, the Fourth of July activities, caterers and other temporary 
food stands, percolation tests and soil evaluations, subsurface sewage 
disposal system inspections, nuisance complaints, hazardous waste 
investigations, leaking underground storage tanks, housing inspections, lead 
paint determinations, smoking and tobacco law enforcement, lake water quality 
sampling, Canada geese control and other miscellaneous inspections. 

The administrative duties of the office include the licensing and the 
enforcement of many of the above items, including issuing permits, enforcement 
orders, issuing citations and holding hearings. Many court appearances were 
made for the enforcement of local regulations and laws . Meetings were 
attended by the Director in order to coordinate planning and development 
within the town. Board of Health meetings were held twice monthly. 

The annual rabies clinic for dogs and cats was held on April 8 at the Fourth 
of July Building on Middlesex Avenue. A total of 271 animals were vaccinated. 




Board of Health annual Rabies Clinic held at the 4th of July building. 

The Public Health Nurse continues involvement in the Community Health Network 
Area 15, emphasis on youth related issues and problems. Lahey Clinic also has 
designated funding for youth problems. 

The Public Health Nurse, Ann FitzGerald, the Tobacco Program Director, Linda 
Kanter, R.N., and the Director of Elderly Services, Theresa Marciello, 
conducted a health fair on September 21, 2000 at the Buzzell Senior Center. 
The highlighted presentations were osteoporosis education, screenings for 
blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol. 



-74- 



Elder abuse and outreach services are a continued concern. Wilmington 
community policing, co-sponsored by Minuteman Senior Services and the District 
Attorney's Office, invited the Public Health Nurse and the Director of Elderly 
Services to a workshop on elder abuse issues and awareness. 

Adolescent Hepatitis-B immunization initiative continues in the Middle School. 
There were 229 students immunized during the year 2000. All childhood 
immunization are available in the nurse's office, including Prevnar for 
infants and toddlers through age 9 with middle ear problems, at no charge to 
residents . 

Annual flu clinics were delayed this year due to a nation-wide distribution 
problem with the flu vaccine. There were 3 clinics this year and a total of 
1,116 doses were given. Pneumonia vaccine is available year round; 23 
residents received pneumonia shots. Medicare reimbursement to the Board of 
Health for 1999-2000 was $1,855.31. Mantoux testing is available and a small 
fee may be charged as the Massachusetts Department of Public Health TB Program 
no longer distributes Aplisol for skin testing. There were 140 TB tests done. 

The communicable disease, which persists in 14-18 year old adolescents, is 
pertussis, "whooping cough," a highly contagious upper respiratory infection 
treatable with antibiotics. Animal bites are frequently reported. Rabies 
continues to be found in warm blooded animals, fox, skunks and raccoons. 

The Public Health Nurse attended four conferences, including the American 
Public Health Association convention in Boston. 

The Board of Health Director and the Public Health Nurse are also part of the 
Health Alert Network in case of outbreak of disease. 

The Public Health Nurse participates on two committees related to 
environmental and health issues, the Kelly Hill Committee and the McDonald 
Road NACCHO Grant Committee. 

A. Communicable Disease Control: 



Immunizations administered 
Office-Flu vaccinations admiinistered 
Home-Flu vaccinations administered 
Clinic-Flu vaccinations administered 
Pneumovax administered 
Hepatitis B vaccinations administered 
Fees Collected (Medicare B) 
Flu distributed 

Communicable Diseases Reported 
Home Visits 



106 
79 
46 
760 
23 
229 
$1, 855 
1,280 

62 




3. Tuberculosis Cases 
Office Visits 
Home Visits 

B . Public Health Nursing : 

1. Premature births/Newborn Report 

Morbidity-V.N. A. Calls/Office Visits 



General Health Supervision/Home Visits 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 
Telephone/Health Conference Calls 

Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 

Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 



1 

140 
4 





13 

236 
158 
442 

358 

16 



-75- 



6 . Skin Screening 
Hearing and Vision 
Blood Pressure 81 
Mantoux 16 
Prostate 

7. Senior Counseling/Drop- In Center 

Number of Sessions 41 

Hypertension Screenings 799 

Diabetic Screenings 108 

General Health (injections) 153 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screenings 56 

8. Blood Lead Testing 1 

9. Blood Analyzer Testing Clients 9 
Total number of tests 73 
Fees Collected $162 

10. Meetings 67 

11. Vaccine Distribution 82 

12. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $2,017 

C . Environmental Health: 

1. Transport/Haulers $3,800 

Stables 675 

Miscellaneous permits 2,110 

Percolation testing 5,400 

Sewage system permits 10,900 

Food establishment permits 8,945 

Installers permits 3,300 

Sub-Division reviews 700 

Massage Therapy/ Funeral Directors 1,200 

Copies 297 

Court witness fees 

Nurse's total fees collected 2,017 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $39,344 

2 . Meetings Attended 104 

3. Disposal Works Construction Inspections 230 

4. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 33 

5. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/REPAIRS 101 

6. Food Establishment Inspections 

Food Service 50 

Retail Food 17 

Residential Kitchen 

Mobile Food 11 

7. Food Establishment Re- Inspections 

Food Service 14 

Retail Food 10 

Residential Kitchen 

Mobile Food 

8. Nuisance Complaint Inspections 27 

9. Nuisance Complaint Re-Inspections 37 

10. Housing Inspections 13 

11. Housing Re-Inspections 2 

12. Percolation Tests 154 



-76- 



13. Court Appearances 10 

14 . Hazardous Waste Investigations 

15. Camp Inspections 

16. Miscellaneous Inspections 86 

17. Lead Inspections 

18. Tobacco Control Program Inspections 98 

19. Title 5 Inspection Reports Received 204 




In an on-going effort to monitor cable subscriber satisfaction the committee 
issued its second annual cable survey. Once again the survey was issued to 
all Wilmington residents with their April water bill. 

Total survey returns exceeded last year's 619 responses by 200. The majority 
of subscribers still appear to be satisfied with cable services and customer 
service. However, the satisfaction level has experienced a significant drop 
when compared with the same measure in 1999. The 2000 survey reports that 
62.12% of subscribers are either very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the 
overall quality of cable service compared with a 72.4% favorability rating the 
prior year. The percentage of subscribers somewhat dissatisfied or very 
dissatisfied with the overall quality of cable service also decreased from 
26.5% in 1999 to 21.03% in 2000. Nearly 17% of respondents to the 2000 survey 
did not have an opinion. 

According to 1999 survey results, 69.3% of subscribers were either somewhat 
dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the price for cable television. This 
dissatisfaction level decreased to 63.10% in 2000. Subscribers who were very 
satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the price of cable rose to 34.10% in 2000 
from 27 . 63% in 1999 . 

Satisfaction with the variety of cable programming increased over the past 
year from 58.96% in 1999 to 65.56% in 2000. At the same time 36.51% of 
respondents were somewhat dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the variety 
of cable programming in 1999 compared with 29.27% of respondents in 2000. 

Survey results indicated that subscribers are less satisfied with the quality 
of cable reception in 2000 as compared with 1999. Nearly 73% of respondents 
stated that they were either very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the 
quality of cable reception. In 1999 the satisfaction level exceeded 85%. 

Subscribers reported a greater level of dissatisfaction with their ability to 
reach a cable representative quickly. In 1999, 28.92% of cable subscribers 
were either somewhat dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with quick access to a 
cable representative. The dissatisfaction level increased nearly 12% in 2000. 

These measures will continue to be tracked over the 10 -year life of the cable 
license. Committee members meet periodically with representatives from AT&T 
Broadband, formerly MediaOne, to discuss subscriber issues. 



-77- 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



The following inspections were conducted by the Sealer of Weights and Measures 
for the year 2000 : 



Type of Device Number Sealed 

Scales tested and sealed 72 

Jeweler's Scales 1 

Gas Meters 152 

Pharmacy Weights 55 

Oil Truck Meters 3 

Truck Scales 8 

Random Weighings of Commodities 125 

Random Sign Inspections 9 

Random Oil Truck Delivery Stops 9 

Random Gas Station Checks 8 

State Licenses Delivered 4 

Gas Meters Not Sealed and Retested 5 

Scales Not Sealed and Retested 2 

Consumer Complaints Acted On 3 

Fees Collected $2,214.00 



During the year 2000 the Sealer obtained certification under the new state law 
governing weights and measures. Under this new law the Sealer will begin 
issuing fines via tickets to individual companies that violate the law. The 
Sealer will increase inspections of home heating oil delivery during the 
winter months. The Sealer's job is to maintain fairness in the marketplace 
for both the consumer as well as the seller. 




McDonald Road following a .snow storm. 



-78- 



EDUCATION 



Wilmingtoo Public Schools 



The Wilmington public school system continues its commitment to the mission 
of providing a student centered education, which fosters critical inquiry 
enabling the individual to be a productive citizen, respectful of self and 
others, capable of adapting to a changing world and its technology. With the 
successful opening of the new Wilmington Middle School and the restructuring 
of the elementary schools into two feeder patterns, the district is well 
positioned to focus even more strongly on educational improvement. 

In the spring of 2000 Wilmington's public schools underwent an intensive 
Department of Education Coordinated Program Review of the implementation of 
many of its programs . The report cited one area needing improvement and 
included the following commendation: "The Department's team commends the 
district for its efforts to provide challenging education programs within the 
regular education classrooms to all students, including students with special 
education needs." 

The district has again been successful in getting grant support for its 
curriculum and professional development needs . We have received more than 
$323,000 in competitive grants, including planning for full-day kindergarten, 
using technology to support the curriculum, supporting smaller class size and 
providing academic support for students at risk for failing the Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) . The district has received additional 
grant funds from the School Business Partnership and the Wilmington 
Educational Foundation to support innovative teaching practices. 




The School Committee used every financial opportunity to support the 
instructional program. Of approximately $175,000 in additional Chapter 70 
State Aid, allocations were made to increase available technology at the high 
school as well as to provide additional professional development resources to 
support the new middle school and to respond to issues raised as part of the 
high school accreditation process . 

In addition to the allocation for high school technology, the district has 
made considerable strides in the technology arena. After a year without a 
Technology Coordinator, that critical position was filled along with the 
addition of a technician to support building level hardware and software 
needs. The middle school has almost 450 computers, making it a state-of-the- 
art facility for our students and teachers. Teachers have had extensive 
professional development opportunities in integrating technology into the 
curriculum and using productivity tools to increase their effectiveness and 
efficiency. The district has successfully updated its Technology Plan under 
the leadership of the Technology Coordinator and the WilCUE Cadre (Wilmington 
Computer Using Educators) . 



The Wilmington public schools system has intensified its efforts to implement 
a standards -based system of curriculum, assessment and instruction. Task 
forces with teacher leadership are underway at all levels to help us further 
align our curriculum with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, with the 
goal of improving our MCAS performance . 



-79- 



Although the Wilmington public schools have not performed overall at the 
level we should achieve on the MCAS, we have made substantial gains in some 
areas, notably at the elementary level. In particular, we are proud of the 
performance on the science test, on which 82 percent of our students 
performed at the proficient or advanced level, compared to 62% for the state. 
Teachers and administrators are intensifying their efforts to prepare 
students for success on the 2001 MCAS administration. 

Results from the Stanford 9 Achievement Test administered this fall to 5th, 
6th, and 8th grade students shows a positive trend overall from previous 
administrations. Our students are performing at the 6th stanine in most of 
the tested areas (Reading, Mathematics, Language, Science and Social 
Sciences) , which places us towards the top of the average range when compared 
to students across the country. 

For the 2000-2001 school year, the district has added an Extended Day 
Coordinator to expand childcare opportunities for the families it serves. 
Before and/or after school programs are available in all early childhood, 
elementary and middle schools. Enrollment has increased over past years. 
Resulting revenues are used to support schools' educational needs. 

The Wilmington public schools take its mission most seriously and will pursue 
its commitment to excellence in all aspects of its educational program. Our 
goal is to be client oriented, with our primary clients being students and 
their families and the community at large. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

The faculty at Wilmington High School is preparing for the fourth round of 
MCAS testing which will begin in April and continue in mid-May. Extra 
practice tests have been scheduled in order to better prepare our students 
for this year's tests. Also, we were visited by the Accreditation Team last 
March and the faculty is very busy now working towards addressing the 
recommendations made by the team in their report. As usual, we strive toward 
excellence in all areas and our goal is to ensure the safety and well-being 
of our students and staff. 




Science Department 

By January of 2000, the Science Department staff and students were heavily 
engaged in Science Fair work. Teachers committed many hours to guiding and 
supporting students and students worked hard as they applied the principles 
of science to answer questions and solve problems. All the work culminated 
in Science Fair 2000 held in the high school gymnasium on May 2, 2000. 
Thirty-seven judges representing twenty-two local agencies and companies 
spent hours examining the work of 152 student exhibitors. The exhibits were 
open for public viewing during the early evening and an estimated 250-300 
parents and interested parties attended to see the projects, talk to the 
students and witness the awards ceremony that ended the event. The Science 
Department thanks Mr. William Fejes of Pacific Scientific and Mr. Edward Shea 
of Shea Concrete Products for their generous support of the Science Fair 
program and awards . 

Throughout 2 000 the Science Department staff worked to improve curriculum, 
assessment and instruction, with closer adherence to both state and national 
curriculum standards and with more focused effort on offering a variety of 
assessment methods. 

In addition to experiencing an 11% enrollment increase in science classes, 
from 745 in 1999 to 839 in 2000, the department also expanded its course 
offerings to include Advanced Placement Biology. The first class of students 
took the AP Biology test in the spring of 2000 with very respectable results. 

The department's fledgling Aquaculture program continued to be popular into 
2000 and gained both financial and technical support from partnership with 
Salem State College Cat Cove Aquaculture Lab. Dr. Mark Fregeau of the SSC 
Biology Department has graciously volunteered his time and resources to 
support the program here. The establishment of a program that would allow 
Wilmington students to serve as interns at Cat Cove is expected to be in 
place by spring of 2001. 

Another partnership and alliance has contributed to the strength of the 
department for 2000. Ms. Beth Lurvey, an intern from Simmons College, has 
joined the department for the 2000-2001 academic year. Ms. Lurvey has 
assumed responsibility for three classes (two chemistry and one integrated 
science) both to add to the collective strength of the teaching staff and to 
satisfy requirements in her pursuit of certification. Ms. Lurvey works 
closely with two cooperating teachers, Mrs. Fran Fiorilla and Mr. John Wood, 
in planning lessons and building her repertoire of instructional strategies. 

The Science Department looks forward to 2001 to continue to refine and expand 
the experiences and learning opportunities for students . 

Social Studies Department 

We are pleased to welcome Mark Staff ier to the department. Mark is a 
graduate of Wilmington, class of 1991. Mark has been teaching in Stoneham 
prior to this year. At the same time he was Assistant Volleyball coach here 
in Wilmington. His area of concentration is in the field of World History. 
Mr. Staffier will also be the advisor to the Mock Trial team and head coach 
of the Volleyball team. 

At the end of this year the Department will sadly bid farewell to two of its 
finer members. Al Fessenden and Larry Maggio will be retiring after many 
years of dedicated service to Wilmington. They will be missed by the entire 
school community. Good luck to you both. Enjoy your retirement. You have 
earned it . 



-81- 



Many of the students at Wilmington are involved in projects that go beyond 
the everyday classroom activity. Members of the AP U.S. History class are 
working on original research projects for entrance to the National History 
Day Contest. Some of the students will be doing displays while others are 
involved in writing extensive papers. Students from Ms. Russell's Honors 
U.S. History classes are once again submitting their research papers to the 
Phi Alpha Theta History Program at Framingham State. This has become a 
tradition at Wilmington. Each year close to a thousand students from around 
the state submit their works to be judged by the faculty at Framingham State 
College. The Wilmington students usually fair quite well. This will be 
Wilmington's second year participating in the Mock Trial program. The 
students will be out to better their second place finish of last year. 

This year is the first that the Department has offered the second year of its 
two year World History curriculum. So far things are going well and we are 
all looking forward to seeing the effect the new curriculum will have on the 
MCAS testing. 

Further changes are in store for the Department in the up coming year. The 
half-year Economics will be revised to become a full-year Honors level 
course. This will be helpful to the many students planning on majoring in 
business at college. Another change of significance involves American 
government. This semester course will be offered for Juniors and Seniors and 
will be paired with Current Events. With all the interest in the election 
this year, the course should be well received. 

English Department 

The English Department welcomes a new teacher to Wilmington High School. 
Miss Karen Packer has a strong English background combined with experiences 
working with students in a variety of roles outside the classroom. She is 
making valuable contributions to our department. 

Also, the English Department is making changes to better align our curriculum 
with the extensive MCAS testing at Grade 10. Additional open-response 
questions are incorporated into testing situations and the department is 
preparing students for a practice MCAS long composition writing prompt to be 
administered to all Grade 9 and Grade 10 students in January. Students are 
reading a variety of new literature titles from authors recommended by the 
English Language Arts frameworks. 

Several Wilmington High students have won local and state poetry and writing 
contests. Tia Marden represented Wilmington at a poetry reading competition 
for Lowell Celebrates Kerouac. Bryan Mather and Amanda Gustin placed at the 
state level for entries in the annual Massachusetts Women's Club writing 
contest. Bryan's poem "Only One Step Here" was the first place winner in the 
poetry category. 

Foreign Language Department 

Although there isn't a foreign language requirement at the High School, more 
than seventy-five percent of the students are now enrolled in a foreign 
language course. Ninety-one per cent of the freshmen and eighty-nine per 
cent of the sophomores take either French or Spanish. Since most students 
take a foreign language course in the seventh and eighth grade, many students 
are able to take the second year of a language in the ninth grade. These 
students may ultimately elect French 5 or Spanish 5 in their senior year. 
Chinese and Latin are also offered as electives. 



-82- 



Because she has a strong interest and appreciation of the value of technology 
in teaching culture, Mrs. Linda Bavuso applied for a 21^*^ Century Classroom 
grant. Being awarded this grant, Mrs. Bavuso received enough funding to 
provide Internet access and three computers for her classroom. Students are 
able to do a variety of activities (pertaining to the Hispanic world) that 
involve Internet research. 

The Foreign Language Club continues to be a very active club under the 
direction of Miss Judith Nowak and Mrs. Karen Carnes . In October two 
busloads of students attended the International Fair in Boston. Students 
were able to experience foreign cultures in a concrete fashion: sampling 
foreign cuisine, enjoying music and dance performances and viewing cultural 
exhibits . 

Business Technology 

The significant downturn in technology stocks and the dramatic increase in 
the cost of natural gas are two examples of the rapid pace and sometimes 
volatile nature of today's business world. The Wilmington High School 
Business Technology Department maintains an on-going review of economic 
activity to ensure that the curriculum and programs are structured in a 
manner that will most effectively prepare students to meet the demands of 
today's business world. With this in mind, the following courses have been 
updated : 

Computer Research places major emphasis on the Internet and electronic 
databases. A final report integrates this course with English, Social 
Studies and the Media Center. Students enrolled in the Computer Applications 
course will be working with concepts in Excel and Access. Desktop Web 
Publishing will incorporate Publisher and Front Page including desktop 
publishing. Accounting and Marketing/Management along with a Junior 
Achievement program are also an integral part of our curriculum. 

Students enrolled in the Marketing/Management course have the option of 
joining DECA. DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of America) gives students 
an opportunity to compete in oral and written competition in series and team 
events. The program enhances students' knowledge of marketing, management 
and entrepreneurship . Students compete with other communities in categories 
such as advertising, marketing, retail merchandising, food marketing, 
restaurant management, finance and credit. These competitions take place at 
district, state and national conferences during the course of the school 
year . 

The Business Technology Department is confident that with our current 
programs and on-going review and diligence, our students will be prepared to 
meet the technology challenges of the 21st century. 

Mathematics Department 

The Mathematics Department at the high school is comprised of seven veteran 
teachers as well as two second year members. Our staff keeps current with 
the changing demands of the frameworks and has examined all courses for 
proper alignment. The newest Mathematics Frameworks were published in 
November 2000 and are currently being studied by the members of the 
department to ensure continued alignment. 



-83- 



Our MCAS scores showed improvement and met the state's improvement rating. 
We have made several changes in response to the initial scores . The two-year 
Algebra I course is now taken in the 9th and 11th grades with the Geometry 
being taken in the 10th grade. This year we have offered a Math Workshop 
class for those students who have performed poorly on the MCAS. This class 
is taken in addition to the student's regular Math class and focuses on 
developing confidence in the subject and examining test-taking skills. We 
are confident that this extra course will make a difference for these 
students when they take the next round of the MCAS tests. 

Plans for the next school year include bringing back computer -programming 
courses . Many of our students plan on pursuing a career in the high tech 
industry and we feel that these offerings will meet the needs of such 
students. Our plans include Visual Basic and C++ programming. 

This year we have three teachers, Gayle Masse, JoAnn Jacobson and William 
Manchester, who are involved in a unique partnership with a local business. 
Analog Devices shares staff resources with the high school. Each of the 
three teachers is working with a mentor from Analog to assist us in our quest 
to prepare our students for careers in technical fields . Plans include 
classroom visitations by the mentors as well as teacher observations at the 
work site. 

Wilmingtoo Middle School 

The Wilmington Middle School opened its doors to 937 students in grades six, 
seven and eight on August 29, 2000. Teachers participated in a three-day 
Summer Institute the prior week to prepare for the opening. The state-of- 
the-art facility includes 45 regular classrooms, a library/media center, a 
television production studio, two computer education laboratories, nine 
science classrooms, two technology education classrooms, a spectacular 450- 
seat auditorium and a large, fully equipped gymnasium. On September 24, 2000 
the Town Manager hosted an Open House, during which a framed photograph of 
the school was unveiled in front of a standing-room-only audience. Residents 
were able to tour the building, watch students perform in various venues 
throughout the school and enjoy refreshments in the new cafeteria. 




Entrance to the new Middle School. 



-84- 



The opening of the middle school represented several years of hard work, 
which brought various constituencies together on behalf of the students of 
Wilmington. Their efforts were evident as the school opened to the "ooh's 
and aah's" of hundreds of amazed youngsters and the positive feedback of 
staff, parents and community members. The school is filled with light and 
color. Student work is displayed throughout the building on bulletin boards 
and in glass showcases. A walk through the building reveals students working 
hard in front of computers, in small groups, in the gym, art class and the 
like. They give presentations, use higher order thinking skills to ask and 
to respond to questions, conduct research and perform. To help students with 
academic and other concerns we offer guidance services, including a full-time 
school psychologist. At the present time students are being trained to help 
us begin our Peer Mediation Program. Participants, under the supervision of 
a staff member, will assist their peers in preventing and resolving student- 
to-student conflicts. 

A typical student day includes classes in language arts, mathematics, social 
studies and science. Seventh and eighth graders take Spanish, French or 
reading. Seventh graders participate in our D.A.R.E. program. Students also 
participate in Unified Arts classes including, art, music, health, physical 
education, computer literacy, technology education and media. Those in band, 
chorus and strings rehearse during a biweekly activity period. Others attend 
classes in web page design, MCAS review, video production and community 
service and the like. After-school activities include our upcoming musical, 
intramural sports, Student Council, math club, yearbook and Destination 
Imagination. Analog Devices sponsors a chapter of Future Scientists and 
Engineers of America. Dances, field trips and sports outings, such as tubing 
and ski club, make up some of our co-curricular offerings. Community service 
projects included collection of donations for the Pine Street Inn and the 
Wilmington Food Pantry. Students are recognized for their efforts through 
our Student of the Month, and P.R.I.D.E. programs. Presidential Fitness 
Awards and academic/unified arts team awards. 

The staff members of WMS are committed to high standards . With the guidance 
of our School Advisory Council, honor roll criteria was revised this year. 
Eighth graders who maintain high academic achievement and demonstrate 
outstanding character, leadership and community service may qualify for 
National Junior Honor Society. Over 1,000 books were read as part of our 
summer reading program. The entire professional staff participated in the 
assessment of the projects submitted upon students' return in August. 
Students are required to write in all subject areas; teachers have been 
trained in the John Collins Writing Program, for which youngsters submit a 
total of 18 pieces of writing during the course of the school year. 

Teachers are involved in MCAS analysis and curriculum alignment with State 
standards on an on-going basis. In addition to MCAS support during Activity 
Period, we are in the planning stages of a summer program for students 
designated at-risk. Teachers are available for extra help after school; 
there is a late bus for those students who avail themselves of extra help 
and/or participate in activities. 

The teachers and support staff members of the Wilmington Middle School have 
worked hard to make the transition to a new, large facility a successful one 
for our students. After moving thousands of boxes, hiring a dozen new 
teachers, furnishing and equipping a 157,000 square foot facility and 
deploying over 400 computers and other technology, we continue to remain 
excited and energized into the year 2001. 



-85- 



NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The North Intermediate School was recently transformed to serve an elementary 
school population of fourth and fifth grade students from the Woburn Street 
and Wildwood district. Over the summer months, the teachers volunteered many 
hours to unpack boxes and arrange their new classroom space. The custodial 
staff assisted by moving furniture and supplies to redesign the classrooms 
for a younger group of students. New windows were installed in the hallways 
and the gymnasium floor refinished. Additional classroom space allowed 
specialty rooms for Art, Music and Special Education instruction. Prior to 
the fall opening of school, parents and students toured the building and 
classrooms to become familiar with the facility. This team effort eased any 
student anxiety and provided for a smooth opening of school. 

Several new initiatives are currently underway which will continue to improve 
the school building. The completion of technological wiring will soon 
provide high speed Internet access in every classroom. This will provide 
immediate curriculum enhancement and support within the classroom. Painting 
of classrooms, doors and hallways, as well as installation of new electrical 
fixtures in the hallways will be scheduled over the next few months. These 
improvements will give the school a brighter appearance. 

Our teachers are involved in several programs that will continue to address 
student achievement for the statewide MCAS test. A fourth and fifth grade 
class are piloting a new math curriculum that includes hands-on problem 
solving activities. Other teachers are piloting a writing portfolio project 
that will be fully implemented in all elementary classrooms next year. We 
are also examining supplementary materials and curriculum units in Science 
and English Language Arts that will better prepare our students for this 
test. Several other student enrichment programs organized by the parents 
include Destination Imagination for group problem solving and the Global 
Child for foreign language instruction. 

This year the Parent Advisory Council encompasses all schools on the North 
side of town. The Northside PAC continues to support our school by 
sponsoring the Teacher Mini -Grant Program and Student Enrichment Series. 
Recently, Gale Blacksnake, from Woodland Village, completed her residency at 
the school. "Black Snake Woman" visited each classroom presenting Native 
American games that teach and promote honesty, integrity and responsibility. 

Paulette Morin, an Egyptologist, fascinated the students with her stories and 
legends of ancient Egypt in her program, "Having Fun with Pyramids and 
Pharaohs." The students learned the meaning of hieroglyphics, handled 
artifacts and even learned how to wrap a mummy. This program supports the 
state curriculum frameworks in the area of ancient civilizations. 

Our Technology Teacher Study Group has been extremely successful. Now in its 
second year, teachers participate in this after school professional 
development program to learn the latest in technological advances and 
software applications that will enhance their classroom and curriculum 
instruction. This has been a wonderful opportunity to share educational web 
sites, lesson activities and develop templates with colleagues that are 
teaching the same subject matter. Our study group recently applied for a 
Department of Education Technology Grant entitled Project MEET. This grant 
will further support our group initiative to incorporate and apply technology 
directly to classroom instruction. 



-86- 



WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 



The Wilmington Public School Department reconfigured its schools for the 
school year 2000. The West Intermediate School from 1964 until 2000 served 
the community as a middle school servicing grades six, seven and eight. 
Beginning in August of 2000 the West Intermediate School began a new era 
servicing children in grades four and five. 



Small class sizes, familiar teachers and the return of Mr. Gorham to the 
Shawsheen/West community greeted students and parents on the first day of 
school . The move 
to the West has 
signaled the 
return to a small 
school 

environment , 
personal attention 
to detail, staff 
working together 
to improve the 
quality of 
instruction and 
the service to 
children. The 
West School 
provides the 
children with 
space that they 
haven't had in 
years. There is 
an art classroom 
specifically 
designed for the 
teaching of art 
education. The 
children have a 
very large music 

room. The room has the risers for presentations and an audio system that 
supports instruction. There is classroom space for specialists, instrumental 
education, conferencing and teacher workrooms. 




Welcome to the West — Enter with a Happy Heart! 



The school is presently able to connect each classroom to the Internet and 
has proposed the purchase of new technology to move the school from an Apple 
platform to a PC platform to ensure continuity of instruction throughout the 
school system. 

We began a new program at the West Intermediate School entitled P.R.I.D.E. 
The students at the West Intermediate School will have P.R.I.D.E. in their 
school. The letters in the word PRIDE form an acronym, which stands for 
Pleasant, Respectful, Industrious, Dependable and Enthusiastic. Students who 
exhibit these qualities in school will be awarded West P.R.I.D.E. cards by 
members of the teaching, secretarial, administrative, custodial and kitchen 
staff. Monthly assemblies will be held to bring students together to review 
the good deeds of the children for each month. Small prizes will be awarded 
to students to encourage student's participation in the program. 

The Shawsheen School PAC will continue to support grades one to five at both 
the Shawsheen and the West Schools. The new name of the PAC will be the 
Shawsheen/West PAC. Enrichment programs, fund raisers and school support 
will continue to be a main function of the PAC. 



-87- 



The West Intermediate School offers an extended day program for students both 
before school opens in the morning and again in the afternoon after school 
closes. Additionally, the school offers a program entitled Global Child that 
teaches Spanish and French to students in a before -school program one day a 
week . 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Shawsheen Elementary School has seen many changes this past year with the 
opening of the new middle school and the reconfiguration of the existing 
schools. The school now serves 475 students in grades one through three. 
Presently we are housing nine first grade classrooms, six second grade 
classrooms and seven third grade classrooms. In addition we have one special 
education classroom. As a result of the reconfiguration of the schools, we 
gained some additional classroom space. With this extra space we were able 
to have a music room and an art room. Our music and art teachers are quite 
pleased to have a room to instruct students in their specialty area rather 
than travel from classroom to classroom. The students benefit as well from 
having a room dedicated to these subjects, since all the necessary materials 
and instruments are readily available to both staff and students for 
instruction . 

The school's and the district's ongoing commitment to strengthening our 
students' literacy skills was enhanced by the addition of the Reading 
Recovery Program. This research-based reading approach detects potentially 
"at-risk" first graders. Through the implementation of an intense, daily, 
one-on-one reading session, students are assisted with guided reading 
approaches for a sixteen to twenty week period. It has been proven that 
there are long lasting, successful results that strengthen the student's 
reading skills from grade to grade with this short-term intervention. 

In addition to this specialized program, the talented members of the 
Shawsheen staff continue to be dedicated to helping students to increase 
their reading and writing skills and study habits. To this end students 
participate daily in a variety of rich and meaningful reading and writing 
experiences. Our commitment to reading and writing is evidenced by two 
evening events that have been held annually to celebrate literacy. At last 
year's "Family Reading Night," parents crowded several classrooms to hear our 
students demonstrate their oral reading skills. Each student who attended 
selected a part of a book or a book they themselves authored to read to the 
audience. Clearly, the students were quite proud of their performances. Our 
annual "Young Author's Night" is a spectacular opportunity for all of our 
students to exhibit the many writing activities in which they participated 
throughout the year. Their creative works are displayed in our cafetorium 
where parents are invited to see the writing produced by their children. 

The school system is exploring the possibility of adopting a new math program 
in the coming year. We are pleased to announce that several Shawsheen 
teachers are piloting the series under consideration. Their input, along 
with teachers from other schools who are piloting the series, will greatly 
assist in the final decision of what series will be adopted. It is because 
of the work of the many teacher leaders at Shawsheen and throughout the 
system that we are able to make such an impact on student instruction and 
learning . 

The Shawsheen School is also committed to helping our students develop good 
character traits to assist them in becoming good citizens. One of the ways 
that we accomplish this goal is through the implementation of a school -wide 



-88- 



"Code of Conduct." There are eight rules that students are asked to follow 
in order to create a more peaceful and safe community at the Shawsheen 
School. The rules are to be honest, to be polite, to harm no one, to respect 
ourselves and others, to respect property, to do our best, to move safely and 
to cooperate. We feel that by helping our students to follow these basic 
rules, we will help instill in them the benefits of good character traits. 



coordinated a food and coat drive. With the assistance of the entire school 
community, the council members collected 25 cases of food that were donated 
to the Wilmington Food Pantry and 160 coats that were given to Anton's 
Cleaners to be cleaned for distribution to those in need. Many of our 
classrooms participated in the "Toys for Tots" program and they collected 
$1,43 0.00. This money was spent on gifts that were delivered to our local 
fire department to be given to less fortunate children. Finally, for the 
first time this year, the Shawsheen PAC sponsored a "Giving Tree." Students 
and their families donated over 500 winter accessory items such as hats, 
gloves, mittens, or scarves that were placed on the tree located in the 
school lobby before being donated to those in need. The participation in and 
the success of these programs speak loudly to the care and compassion of the 
Shawsheen School community. These events truly taught our students the 
meaning of giving to others . 

During this presidential election year our students were able to take part in 
a mock election sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Library. The students were 
instructed according to the lesson plans provided us by this organization. 
They increased their knowledge about the election process in addition to 
learning more about the candidates running for the office of President. 
Through the collaboration of several of our teachers and our student council, 
voting booths were constructed so our students could experience the voting 
process firsthand. It clearly was a memorable experience for our student 
body who were proud to vote for the candidate of their choice. This was 
another meaningful learning experience for our students, especially with 
respect to civic responsibility. 




To further 
reinforce good 
character 
building, our 
students have 
increased their 
knowledge of 
civic 

responsibility 
through their 
participation in 
several 
community 



programs . Our 
third grade 
student council, 
under the 
direction of our 
assistant 
principal, has 



service 



Shawsheen School 3rd Grade Students take us on a "Tour of Washington" — featured 
here are the Capitol Building and the Korean War Memorial. 



-89- 




Continuing our Wusliington Tour — The National Zoo. 



Parent involvement is 
welcomed at the Shawsheen 
School . There are several 
ways that parents have been 
involved. The first is 
through their participation 
in our very active Parent 
Advisory Council (PAC) . 
With the reconfiguration of 
the Shawsheen and West 
Intermediate Schools, it 
was decided that there 
would be one PAC to serve 
both schools. The PAC 
remains committed to 
providing resources and 
activities to enhance the 
students' learning 
experiences and to support 
a positive school climate. 
To this end the PAC 
sponsors four to five 
enrichment programs that 
complement the curriculum. 
They have also organized 
several social activities 
such as family fun night 
and an ice cream sundae 
night. Finally the PAC has 
assisted us in 
demonstrating the school 
spirit that exists at the 
Shawsheen by hosting 
specialty days such as 
"Crazy Hat Day" and 
"Favorite Sport Team Day." 



The PAC continues to fund mini grants for teachers, awarding them with money 
to purchase resource materials to augment their instructional practices. 



A second way for parent involvement is by becoming a member of the Shawsheen 
School Advisory Council (SAC) . The SAC is instrumental in assisting the 
principal in developing a school improvement plan. The plan addresses school 
goals and outlines action steps to meet these goals. Areas addressed in the 
plan are literacy skills, school and student safety, technology, class size, 
school climate, communication between the home and the school and the diverse 
needs of the student population. The SAC meets monthly to tackle a long list 
of agenda items. This year, the SAC is also hoping to design a school 
brochure . 



Finally parents can become involved through our parent volunteer program. We 
were very fortunate to have a parent volunteer coordinator this year. 
Besides recruiting parents to be volunteers, the parent coordinator assists 
in placing parents in several of the areas where help is needed: assistance 
in the library, supervision in the lunchroom and assistance with office 
needs. Our parent volunteers have proven to be a very valuable resource. 
Through the parent involvement in the above opportunities, the Shawsheen 
School has been able to establish and strengthen the educational partnership 
between the home and school to benefit our children. 



-90- 



Three new programs have been added to the Shawsheen School this year: 
Extended Day, Global Child and Destination Imagination. We are pleased to 
announce that the Shawsheen School offers extended day opportunities for 
before and after school. The Extended Day Coordinator has developed these 
programs and the activities offered to students. Those who participate in 
the before school program are served a hot breakfast as well as participating 
in games before the start of school. During the after school program, 
students have a chance to wind down with some fun activities or do their 
homework before enjoying an afternoon snack. 

If students were interested in learning either French or Spanish this year, 
their parents had an opportunity to enroll them in Global Child, a fee-based 
foreign language program. Students who joined this program met once weekly, 
before or after school, for a fifty-minute session to participate in a 
variety of fun-filled activities to help them learn a foreign language. 
There are two semesters per year for students to learn the language of their 
choice . 

Destination Imagination (formerly know as Odyssey of the Mind) has arrived at 
the Shawsheen School this year. We have one primary team that practices 
weekly. The team will have a chance to showcase their problem- solving skills 
and teamwork at a tournament held at the Andover High School in March. We 
want to wish these students the best of luck with this endeavor. 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 



The Woburn Street School has undergone a reconfiguration this year, due to 
the opening of the new Wilmington Middle School. After operating for many 
years as a grades 1-5 building, the Woburn Street School is now a grades 1-3 
building, serving students living on the north side of Wilmington. This 
reconfiguration has brought about many changes. Mr. Arsenault is now the 
principal of the Woburn Street School, having moved from the Wildwood School 
where he served as principal for many years, and working with Mr. Ferriero, 
who served as assistant principal before the reconfiguration. The 
reconfiguration has also resulted in several staff changes. In first grade 
several teachers have come from the Wildwood School, joining the Woburn 
Street staff and making a total of eight first grade classrooms. Two 
teachers have come from the Wildwood at the second grade level and one 
teacher was newly hired in June, making a total of eight second grade 
classrooms. Similarly in third grade, teachers transferring from the 
Wildwood have joined with newly hired teachers combining with teachers who 
have been teaching at the Woburn Street School to make a total of seven third 
grade classrooms. This "new" staff has blended together wonderfully and 
already it seems as if they have worked together for many years. 

In addition to the classroom staff changes, there are a number of new staff 
members among the specialists. Special education, physical education, art, 
music and reading, all have staff members who either came to the Woburn 
Street School from the Wildwood or who have been newly hired. In addition 
there is a new librarian, a new school psychologist, a new school secretary 
and a new school nurse. With so many changes it is only natural that the 
Woburn Street School has developed a new feeling. However, the creation of a 
new staff, formed from a core of dedicated professionals who have been at the 
Woburn Street School for many years and who lend stability to the 
reconfiguration, joined with others who are newly hired or who have 
transferred from the Wildwood School, has charged the atmosphere with renewed 
enthusiasm and brought growth to the school. There has been a combining of 
instructional forces that is finely balanced and which has made the Woburn 
Street School an even more exciting place to work and learn. 



-91- 



Holiday Concert at the Wobum Street School. 



This year is a year of change at the Woburn Street School for other reasons 
as well. For the first time the third grade students will be tested in 
reading with the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) , 
developed by the Massachusetts Department of Education. During the week of 
April 9-12 third graders will complete the third grade MCAS, answering both 
multiple choice questions in reading and open response questions, requiring 
them to write answers using textual evidence to support their statements. In 
the past, the state tested third grade students using the reading portion of 
the IOWA Test of Basic Skills. This test only required the children to read 
and answer a series of multiple choice questions. Teaching children to read 
effectively and be able to express their ideas clearly in writing, requires 
sound instructional practices that must be cumulative. The staff of the 
Woburn Street School recognizes this and works together to achieve this goal. 

In preparation of the third grade MCAS, students will be additionally 
instructed using MCAS English Language Arts Coach, Grade 3 and Strategies for 
Success in Reading. These materials are standards based, they replicate the 
activities and expectations of the MCAS test and they provide opportunities 
for third graders to practice the skills they've been taught in reading 
before the actual test is administered. The data from past administrations 
of the fourth grade MCAS continue to be used to improve instruction and to 
increase the level of performance achieved by our students. 

For the past few years the Wilmington public schools have been fortunate to 
receive funding from the Department of Education through a support services 
grant to provide an after school academic support program for students who 
placed at the failure or needs improvement levels on the MCAS. This program, 
entitled Assisting Academic Achievement , was offered to students in fourth 
and fifth grades two afternoons each week for a period of twelve weeks from 
January to May. This year this grant has again been received but, for the 
first time, students in grade three will be included in the program. Three 
groups of third grade students at the Woburn Street School will be included 
in this program and will receive additional reading instruction in a small 



-92- 



group setting two afternoons each week for ten weeks. Students will be 
selected on the basis of greatest need as indicated by their performance on 
the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test. The use of standardized test data is a 
mandated requirement from the state for inclusion in this program. 

Literacy, its importance, its instruction and its improvement has been 
identified as a major goal for the superintendent and for the Wilmington 
public schools. At the Woburn Street School, we have embraced this goal and 
are working towards an improved focus of this multi-faceted area of 
curriculum. We are offering increased services for first grade students in 
the Reading Recovery Program. Last year we had a half-time Reading Recovery 
teacher, shared with the Wildwood School and this year we are happy to have a 
full time Reading Recovery teacher. Recognizing the need for increased 
Reading Recovery services, we are hopeful of hiring an additional teacher for 
this program next year. In addition we are exploring the use of two reading 
intervention programs. Early Success, in grades one and two, and Soar to 
Success in grade three. These programs will provide additional support for 
our at-risk students and will help them achieve success. We have implemented 
a new spelling program, CAST-A-SPELL, for all students in grades 1-3 and we 
are examining materials through a districtwide task force for improving the 
instruction of English language skills. Writing is being emphasized by an 
elementary Pilot Portfolio Program being headed by Mr. LaPointe . This is a 
system-wide initiative and we are pleased to announce that the Woburn Street 
School has a large number of teachers who are participating in this program. 
In addition, students in grades two and three were administered a writing 
prompt in October which simulated the MCAS long composition test. These were 
scored following the MCAS scoring method and provided a pretest score in 
writing for each child. A post test will be administered in May 2001. The 
Global Child is another new program being offered at the Woburn Street School 
this year. This is an after school program providing foreign language 
instruction to students in grades one, two and three. Both French and 
Spanish are taught on Tuesday and Friday afternoons. This program challenges 
students and prepares them to live and compete in a global society and a 
changing America. At present this is an elective program, funded by tuition 
payments made by the parents of participating students. Research tells us 
that young children are the most receptive to learning additional languages 
and we are pleased to be able to offer this program at the Woburn Street 
School . 

The Wilmington Public Schools Extended Day Program has also changed this 
year. It is now site based, allowing Woburn Street children who participate 
in the program to remain at the Woburn Street School. Extended Day children 
are no longer bused to another location for the after school part of this 
program. Mrs. LaBossiere is the head teacher for the program at the school 
and children can take advantage of the program's services before and after 
school without ever having to leave the Woburn Street School . 

Another change brought about by the reconfiguration is the reorganization of 
the PAC. There is now a Westside PAC and a Northside PAC . Parents of 
children attending the Woburn Street School belong to the Northside PAC, 
which also includes parents from the Wildwood Early Childhood Center and the 
North Intermediate. Maintaining their established tradition, the Woburn 
Street parents continue to work tirelessly conducting fundraisers to benefit 
the school. The annual Pumpkin Fair, held in October, raised a large amount 
of money, as do the other sales and activities which the PAC sponsors 
throughout the year. Funds raised from PAC sponsored activities are now 
shared between the three schools on this side of town. The PAC continues to 
support the programs of the school by providing money to teachers for 
materials and by sponsoring enrichment programs for the students. Without 
their efforts, we would not have the funds to provide these kinds of 
programs . 



-93- 



BOUTWELL EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center underwent reconfiguration changes this 
past summer, as did most of the schools in Wilmington. It is once again home 
to Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten classrooms. The building has available 
space for twelve classrooms and currently we have an Integrated Preschool 
class, a Special Education Preschool class, four half -day Kindergarten 
classes and one Kindergarten Enrichment classroom. The remaining classroom 
space is being utilized as well. The art and music teachers each share a 
classroom this year, so we no longer have "Art in a Cart" or a traveling 
"Music Show." There is a motor room used by the Occupational and Physical 
Therapists. The children enjoy working in this room which contains a 
trampoline, platform swing, frog swing, tumbling mats, a tunnel, climbing 
apparatus, bikes, a ball pit and lots of other gross motor equipment. The 
Speech & Language Pathologist and the Learning Resource Specialist each share 
a classroom. The teachers also have a classroom available to them as the 
"teacher work/resource room." This room houses the photocopy machines, 
laminator, teacher resource books and space for the teachers to do group 
planning. The last remaining classroom is used for a variety of activities. 
The Scholastic Book Fair, Picture Day, Global Child and our PAC meetings are 
all held in this classroom. Our gymnasium/auditorium or "All Purpose Room" 
is used for our gym classes, arrival and dismissal, lunches for students 
attending the enrichment program and all school -wide activities. 

The Global Child is a fee-based foreign language program being offered for 
students in grades K-5 this year. At the Boutwell, Spanish and French 
classes were held in the fall and spring. They were called "Lunch and Learn" 
Classes because they were held midday. The focus at this level was on 
playing and singing. 



The Boutwell Early 
Childhood Center is 
very fortunate to 
have a small, but 
extremely dedicated 
and active Parent 
Advisory Council. 
The Scholastic Book 
Fair and the annual 
wrapping paper 
fundraiser were both 
very successful 
endeavors . The PAC 
also set up various 
enrichment programs 
throughout the school 
year. In the fall 
Mary Alice Ami don 
entertained us all 
with song and dance. 
In mid-January the 
"Wingmasters-Birds of 
Prey" program was 

held. In April Bubblemania was held. This is an annual favorite of the 
students and staff. A scientist actually encases one of the students inside 
a bubble. Can you imagine? The PAC also sponsored a Family Fun Night and an 
Ice Cream Smorgasbord in the spring. These two events are held during the 
evening so that students and their families can participate. 




Dr. Geraldine O'Donnell. Superintendent of Schools, with kindergarten .students at the Boutwell 
Early Childhood Center 



-94- 



The Boutwell Early Childhood Center strives to stay involved in the 
community. Two of our annual outreach programs are a food drive sponsored 
during the month of December and a coat drive sponsored from mid-November to 
mid- January. Coats are dropped off at the school and a parent volunteer 
brings them to Anton's Cleaners where they are cleaned free of charge. The 
Salvation Army then distributes them to needy families. We are very proud of 
our participation in these worthwhile outreach projects. In February another 
outreach project that the Boutwell participated in was the Pennies for 
Patients program. Spare change was collected each day in a large jug and at 
the end of a three-week period the money was collected and counted. A check 
was then sent to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Before counting all of the 
money the children each tried to guess the amount in the jug. The child 
whose guess was the closest received a new book from the school . 




Town Manager Michael Caira answering questions from kindergarten students at the Bout\\-ell Early Childhood Center. 

Literacy Month was held in November. Volunteers from the Kiwanis Club came 
and read to the preschool classes. Each year the club chooses a theme and 
this year's was "Reading is Fundamental." Thanks to the efforts of the 
Kiwanis Club, both the Wildwood and the Boutwell Early Childhood Centers were 
recipients of two sets of multicultural books. These books were placed in our 
library and are being used to supplement the curriculum. 

Mock elections were held in November to go along with the national election. 
The staff and students wore red, white and blue to go along with the theme. 
Even the building was dressed in red, white, and blue. Children painted 
voting booths, made ballot boxes and learned all about the candidates and 
even held a secret ballot to cast their own vote. The Town Manager, Mr. 
Michael Caira, came and spoke to the children about the election, voting and 
being a citizen. We sang a song about voting that one of our Kindergarten 
teachers wrote. When the presentation was over we all enjoyed red, white or 
blue milk along with a snack. 

Preschool and Kindergarten staff at the Boutwell continued work on revising 
the current curriculum. Early release days scheduled during the year were 
used for this purpose. The revised curriculum was developed to coincide with 
the Massachusetts Department of Education's Curriculum Frameworks. In 
addition, the Boutwell will be applying for accreditation from the National 
Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) . The process of 
accreditation will take approximately two years to complete. 



-95- 



WILD WOOD EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 



The Wildwood School, like all of the other schools in Wilmington, has 
undergone some exciting changes as a result of the school system re- 
organization plan. We have now become the Wildwood Early Childhood Center. 
Our center now houses four kindergarten classrooms, a Kindergarten Special 
Education Bridge Program, an Extended Day Kindergarten Program, an Integrated 
Pre-school Program and a Pre-school Special Education classroom. 
Additionally we provide a before and after school care program for our 
families. The Global Child Program, a supplementary fee-based foreign 
language program, is also offered to kindergarten children during the school 
year . 

Our Kindergarten Program and the Integrated Pre-School Programs are presently 
half -day programs. The Bridge Program and the Special Needs Pre-School 
Program follow full-day schedules. We also are able to provide classroom 
space for our art and music classes. Physical Education classes are held in 
our cafeteria/gymnasium. Lunches are served to our full day children on a 
daily basis. Special education support services, such as Speech/Language 
Therapy, Resource/Learning Support, Occupational and Physical Therapy are 
also available for students needing such assistance. 

Literacy is one of the most important facets of our curriculum at the 
Wildwood Early Childhood Center. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center prides 
itself on being a student -centered educational facility, emphasizing 
individual student achievement, strong student -centered curriculum, family 
involvement and positive school climate. Staff continues to work tirelessly 
at improving our curriculum, in accordance with the state frameworks, in an 
effort to provide our students with the skills to develop literacy that will 
last them a lifetime. 

There are many activities that support literacy that take center stage at the 
school. In the fall a very successful Scholastic Bookfair is held through 
the efforts of our parent volunteers. Our families purchase books and 
literacy materials and the proceeds are used to purchase books for our 
classrooms and library. 

Again this year the Wildwood Early Childhood Center is participating in the 
"Spread The Word" Program sponsored by the Massachusetts Department of 
Education. Students, staff, families and individuals from the Wilmington 
community donate children's books to the Wildwood, where they will be 
collected and sorted. The Department of Education then distributes the books 
to needy children in another community in the commonwealth to take and keep 
at home. This project is our way of sharing our love of books and reading 
with children in another community. 

Our Parent Advisory Council is part of the larger Northside PAC, which 
represents the Wildwood Early Childhood Center, Woburn Street School and the 
North Intermediate School. As usual, our parents bring forth great interest 
and enthusiasm in all of their efforts that support our school. The Pumpkin 
Fair was the big fall event for our families. The PAC was then able to offer 
financial support to each school with the proceeds from the fair. The 
Wildwood staff used the funds to support literacy in our Early Childhood 
Center. Big Book sets and individual children's guided reading book sets 
were purchased with these funds . The PAC also sponsors enrichment programs 
at the Wildwood School. Mary Alice Amedon visited our school and charmed her 
audience with songs, fables and stories from different cultures and lands. 
Bubblemania is usually presented in the spring. This program brings a 
visiting scientist who actually encases a student in a huge bubble before 
your eyes. Enrichment programs sponsored by our PAC are always special 
events for the children during the school year. 



-96- 



The presidential election was a true red, white and blue celebration at the 
Wildwood. The pre-school and kindergarten children learned about the 
political parties, candidates and election history. Our school was decorated 
with election regalia and Mr. Michael Caira, Town Manager, met with the 
children to talk about the importance of voting and answered the students' 
questions about the town. Each student then entered the "Voting Booth" to 
cast his or her secret ballot. The following day our school was one of the 
sites for official voting in Wilmington, so the children were able to observe 
the actual process throughout the day. We have been especially fortunate 
this year to have been the grateful recipients of a new American flag, which 
graces our stage, from the Veterans of Foreign Wars. We greatly appreciate 
their support . 




Students at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center — Election Day 2000. 



Other special programs take place throughout the year involving town 
officials that come to our school and establish important relationships with 
our young students. Officer Shelley is a friendly and familiar face to all 
the children as he presents bus and community safety programs in the fall. 
Lt . Hurley and other fire fighters bring important fire safety messages and 
programs. We are thankful to have such community involvement and support for 
the children at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center. 



In December the entire school participated in our "Winter Celebration" 
Concert. Pre-school and kindergarten classes joined together to entertain 
parents, grandparents and friends with songs about various winter holiday 
traditions. We all learned about Christmas, Chanukah and Kwanza. We even 
had a surprise visit from Frosty the Snowman! WHAT A TREAT! We hope 
everyone saw our show on local cable TV, WCTV. 



-97- 






Maiy Alic e Anudcm performed at the Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers in October 2000. 



We are working to establish a new library at our center that will have age 
and grade level books, materials and resources for our students and staff. 
We have received some funding through grants, which will provide financial 
support for this worthwhile project. The Wilmington Kiwanis Club shared a 
goal of literacy with our school this year. Following a presentation about 
our literacy activities, the Kiwanis Club donated two sets of multi -cultural 
books to our center. The children as well as staff will place them in our 
library for use in their curriculum planning. 

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT: KINDERGARDEN TO 12th GRADE 

With the building of the new Middle School and the redistricting of the 
elementary grades, changes can be seen in the Fine Arts Department. From 
Kindergarten to Eighth Grade students receive regular art instruction. 
Kindergarten students receive instruction weekly for one-half hour while 
every elementary grade receives weekly forty- five minute classes. The middle 
school schedule has continued with ninety-minute classes daily for a six-week 
period. This allows for intensive instruction necessary for this age group. 
Having one middle school has brought both art teachers together allowing for 
a more collaborative approach. We are happy to welcome Deborah Chisholm as 
our new middle school teacher. She received her undergraduate degree from 
Massachusetts College of Art and her graduate degree from Rhode Island School 
of Design. Not only does she bring her talent and creativity to the school 
but her knowledge of current art educational philosophies. The high school 
curriculum has expanded its offerings with a Graphic Design class starting 
school year 2000. This course provides instruction in traditional paste-up 
and layout techniques as well as use of Adobe Illustrator and PhotoShop. The 
high school welcomes Jessie Queior as our new teacher. Jessie has extensive 
professional experience using these computer programs and has been an 
excellent addition to the high school program. The additional staff has 
allowed us to introduce Three -Dimensional Design; Printing/Bookmaking as an 



-98- 



art elective. The Three D design class allows students to explore a variety 
of techniques besides clay. The printmaking and bookmaking will not only 
help students experience various printing technique but also allow them to do 
some writing and illustrating for their books. The schedule still offers Art 
I/II, III/IV and Portfolio, Drawing and Painting as well as Advanced 
Placement. This year we have three seniors and three juniors preparing AP 
portfolios. The popular Photography classes are once again overenrolled and 
the Animation/video class continues its collaboration with our local 
television station. Students are exposed to professional equipment and are 
team taught with the station's personnel as well as Miss Queior. 

Revising our curriculum to reflect the Performing and Fine Arts Frameworks is 
a time consuming process. The elementary teachers have used their release 
time to complete the elementary portion and are now inserting where the 
Frameworks apply. At our last district art department meeting we reviewed 
our philosophy and are in the process of updating it. We expect this process 
to continue for at least another school year. 

Field trips are 
conducted at all levels. 
The Peabody Museum in 
Salem exhibit "The 
Odyssey, " which traced 
certain themes, such as 
portraiture, through the 
centuries and from 
different culture 
perspectives. Karen 
Larrabee took some of 
her classes at the 
Woburn Street school and 
Mrs . Shack took high 
school students to 
experience this exhibit. 
This fall the Three 
Dimensional and advanced 
students studied the 
Decordova Museum' s 
Sculpture Park first on 
the Internet and then 
were given a guided tour 
of the various 
sculptures . 

In the Scholastic Art Awards competition, Sarah Lund's Portfolio was selected 
for National Judging and Stephanie Sordillo's sculpture was awarded Honorable 
Mention. Sarah Lund's Advanced Portfolio was also given a 3 rating. Sarah 
is presently studying art at the University of Massachusetts at Westfield. 
Our students are also studying art at UMASS Dartmouth, Florida State, 
Montseuraut College, Hallmark Institute of Photography and other advanced 
institutions . 

Parents and students have continued to be pleased at the continuing art work 
showing at the Roman House. Letters of congratulations are sent home to 
those students whose work is selected and inviting them to view their 
displayed pieces . 




Wilmington High School art students tour the Decordova Museum 's Sculpture Park. 



-99- 



SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

During the last calendar year the Special Education Department received 186 
referrals for initial TEAM evaluations and provided special education and 
related treatment services to approximately 501 special needs students ages 
3-22 . 

The Special Education Department developed two new Early Childhood special 
education programs during the past year. Both programs commenced operation 
with the opening of schools in August. The first program is a full -day 
kindergarten special education program and the second program is a program 
for children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or Autism. Both of 
these programs are intense programs having very small ratios for instruction, 
extended school years and in the case of the PDD/autistic program, home 
training for parents. Both of these programs are located at the Wildwood 
Early Childhood Center. 

These two new programs allow the school department to provide for these young 
children who have significant needs, within Wilmington, thus providing 
opportunities for least restrictive programming for the students as well as 
cost effective service options for the school department. 

The Special Education Department has received a state grant for purposes of 
establishing training programs for staff on techniques to enhance early 
literacy skills development for young children, as well as training with the 
new individualized educational plan (lEP) recently developed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education. Planning and training in both of 
these areas is well underway and all training activity should be completed by 
the close of the 2000-2001 school year. 

During the past year the Special Education Department received a full 
compliance review from the State Department of Education. This compliance 
review assessed the Wilmington Special Education Department ' s level of 
compliance with 65 specific areas of state and federal statutes and 
regulations. The Department is proud to state that our program was found to 
be 100% in compliance with each of these standards. The school district 
received a commendation from the Department of Education regarding the high 
level of its commitment to quality services for disabled students. 
Particularly the Department of Education cited the school department's 
"extensive efforts to integrate special education services into the regular 
education classroom and to integrate the regular education curriculum into 
special education programs." 

SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Wilmington School Food Service employs fifteen full-time staff members and 
twenty-four part-time. We are a self-supporting department within the School 
Department. All salaries including the Director's and Secretary's, food 
purchases, equipment and most maintenance as well as office supplies are paid 
from student lunch participation, reimbursement from the Department of 
Education, catering functions such as National Honor Society Banquets, 
luncheons, coffee hours. Senior Citizen Lunch Program, Extended Day Care 
Program and any other programs that allow us to cater and put these monies 
back into the program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture food based menus. 
We have upgraded our computer system to provide us with a more up-to-date 
accounting system. We continue to investigate available software to keep us 
in the forefront of food service. 



-100- 



We offer students many lunch choices to encourage participation at the 
reasonable price of $1.25. A total of 351,241 student meals were served this 
school year. 

The opening of Wilmington Middle School was a wonderful happening this year. 
A new kitchen with state-of-the-art-equipment and a bright new cafeteria were 
the highlights of the opening days of school. It was a smooth opening thanks 
to the efforts of a new and an experienced staff. They deserve much credit, 
as does the entire School Food Service staff for their caring and cooperative 
manner with the students and staff. 

We have completed our mural project in the North Intermediate, Woburn Street 
and Shawsheen Schools. We are starting work on the West Intermediate School 
and will hopefully complete the project this year. With our new snack bar in 
the High School we've expanded our services to include athletic events when 
possible . 

We once again participated in Framingham State College's Graduate Intern 
Program. A student intern studied under the Wilmington School Food Service 
Program. With this assistance, we are able to do surveys of our program and 
continue to upgrade services to the students and staff. It is an enriching 
experience for all of us. 

At present there are twenty-eight National Restaurant Association certified 
sanitarians on staff. The hope is to have all staff certified. We continue 
to train our staff in sanitation, safety, CPR and Heimlich Maneuver. 

The Senior Citizen meals-on-wheels and congregate lunches are produced and 
served at the West Intermediate School. They are served year round. We 
served 16,304 meals to our senior citizens this year. Contact the Senior 
Drop- In Center to join in the lunch program. 

We are always striving to improve our services to the students and community 
and are happy to respond to any suggestions and requests when possible. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION & ATHLETICS 

The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students (K-12) as 
well as providing an adaptive program for students with special needs. 

The Elementary Health Program once again has incorporated "Project Charlie" 
into the curriculum. In Grade 5 we continue to offer the DARE Program, in 
cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and Officer Chip Bruce. 
These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol education through 
teaching of self-esteem, responsibility and decision making. A Scholastic 
Science program has been added for all grade levels to enhance the existing 
health curriculum. 

The Physical Education Curriculum at the High School, Health Dynamics, is a 
comprehensive program dealing with health, fitness and life skills. Students 
will examine appropriate health topics including substance abuse, nutrition, 
physical fitness, human sexuality, mental health and stress management. The 
curriculum also incorporates effects of the environment, consumer issues, 
ecology and social issues in the program. Related physical activities 
designed to reinforce health issues will be offered to ensure a complete 
holistic sense of mental, spiritual and physical well-being. 

The High School Physical Education & Health Department has added a Lifelong 
Fitness Elective Course for Grades 11 & 12. Students are participating in 
activities that will maintain and enhance their personal physical fitness 
levels. Cardiovascular fitness training, individual sports and highly 
competitive traditional games have been stressed. 



-101- 




The Physical Education Department cited several students for Outstanding 
Achievement in Physical Education for 2000: 

Academic Excellence Awards were presented to the following students: 

Class of 2001: Kimberly Gillespie and Joshua Hiltz 
Class of 2002: Stefanie Quinton and Justin Strem 
Class of 2003: Jennifer Rogers and David Velardo 

Academic Achievement Awards were presented to the following students: 

John Jamerson, Matthew Boland, Michele Lemos, Kirsten Pizzoti, Rebecca Rufo 

Outstanding Effort Awards were presented to the following athletes: 

David Hanley, Joanne Emerick, John Tobin III, Jordan Weiner, Joshua Hewlett 

President's Challenge Award Winners: 

Class of 2001 - Caitlin Bransfield, Scott Buck, Chris Calway, Justin 

Cammaratta, Jeff Cannon, Jim Fennelly, Robert French, Kim 
Gillespie, Andy Hackett, David Hanley, Joshua Hiltz, Mark 
Jepsen, Felicia Newhouse, Al Quinton, Joe Ranno, Marc 
Sollazzo, Lori Vachon 

Class of 2002 - Lisa Antonangeli, Diane Dellascio, Chris Minghella, Kristin 

Pizzotti, Stephanie Quinton 

Class of 2003 - Lauren Crowley, Katie Halas, Mary Sullivan, Jordan 
Ungvarsky, Alexis Wade 

Athletic Awards/Recipients: 

• Dr. Gerald Fagan Award: "To the Most Outstanding Wilmington High School 
Senior Athlete:" Eric Banda and Kristin Kacamburas 

• Lawrence H. Gushing, Sr. Award: "To the Senior Demonstrating 
Sportsmanship, Scholarship and Athletic Ability:" John Gillis and Maura 
Lynch 

• Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award: "To the Senior Athlete Demonstrating 
Dedication to Athletics at Wilmington High School:" Patrick Heffernan and 
Lyndsay Bruno 

• Joseph H. Woods Jr. Memorial: "To the Senior Athlete Demonstrating 
Courage, Discipline and Tenacity while attending Wilmington High School:" 
Eric Banda and Kara Langone 

• Jack Smith Award: "To a Senior Athlete Demonstrating Commitment to 
Athletics:" Darren Arciero 

Highlights : 

The 1999-2000 Ice Hockey Team, coached by Steve Scanlon won the CAL 
Championship. The 2000 Golf Team, coached by Al Fessenden won the CAL and 
State Division III Championship. The 2000 Football Team, coached by Bob 
Almeida won the CAL Co-Championship. Wilmington High School Senior Bobby 
French was named Boston Globe, Boston Herald and Lowell Sun All Scholastic as 



-102- 



well as the Boston Globe and Cape Ann Leag^je Player of the year. Wilmington 
High School Senior Patrick Heffeman, coached by Mike Pimental, won the 13 5- 
pound. Division III, State Wrestling Championship. Interim Boys Soccer Coach 
Steve Scanlon, filling in for his father, Dick Scanlon, A-as naned the Lowell 
Sun Coach of the Year. 




High School football leur , . 



PERSONNEL 

The following people retired fro- -he Wilmington Public Schools this past 
year: Florence Athanasia, Guidance Zerar'-er.- rhair at Wilmington High 
School; Joy Boucher, Elaine Curran, Ar_r-e Z ?.eillj\ John Hartnett, and William 
Peabody, Middle School teachers; Sandra Eraser and Judyann Murray, Elementary 
School Teachers; and Nancy Stouffer, Elementary Reading Teacher. The 
Wilmington school community wishes to thank these people for their many years 
of dedicated service to the children of Wilmington and wishes them many happy 
and healthful retirement years. 

In conclusion, Ae >.ould like zo take rhis opportunity ro extend our 
appreciation to the administrators, teachers, support scaff, parents and 
students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington P'oblic Schools 
during the 1999-2000 school year. We are especially grateful to all who 
worked tirelessly toward the goal of opening our state-of-the-art new middle 
school in August, 2000. As the plaque on the new school so appropriately 
states, it is "dedicated to the citizens of Wilmington as a testimony to 
their commitment to excellence in education for the youth of Wilmington." We 
also express a special note of thanks to the many town departments, 
particularly the custodial staff who worked diligently throughout the summer 
to reconfigure the school buildings Pre -Kindergarten through Grade 8 and did 
so ahead of schedule. This spirit of cooperation among all town departments 
was one special welcome into the new millennium. 



-103- 



hawsheee Regional Vocatioeal Technical High 
chool District 



The Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational/Technical School District is pleased 
to submit its 2000 Annual Report to the citizens of Bedford, Billerica, 
Burlington, Tewksbury and Wilmington. Located on Cook Street in Billerica 
next to the Towns of Burlington and Wilmington, we celebrated our 31st 
anniversary offering quality vocational technical education to area youth and 
residents . 

The District is governed by a ten-member, elected School Committee empowered 
by the Massachusetts General Laws and by a Regional Agreement among the five 
member towns . 

Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee include: Mark 
Trifiro and Don Drouin from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice Chairman and 
Bernard F. Hoar, Treasurer, from Billerica; John P. Miller, Chairman and 
Alfred Verrier from Burlington; J. Peter Downing and Patricia W. Meuse from 
Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis, Secretary and Robert G. Peterson from 
Wilmington. Charles Lyons is Superintendent/Director of the District, 
serving in that capacity since 1987. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School is one of twenty-seven regional 
vocational technical school districts in Massachusetts. Eleven hundred and 
fifty high school students were enrolled in Shawsheen Tech's day school 
programs in October of 2000. Over eight hundred adults also participated in 
Shawsheen Tech's adult and continuing education courses. 

The high school graduating class of 2000 numbered two hundred twenty-five 
seniors. Sixty-seven percent of these alums secured employment in their 
respective professions immediately after graduation; seventeen percent 
elected to pursue further education in post secondary institutions; and two 
percent joined the armed services. The placement statistics for this class 
are among the highest of the twenty-seven other regional vocational technical 
schools located in the Commonwealth. 

Shawsheen Tech has articulation agreements with eleven area colleges, all of 
who grant students college credit for the work they complete during high 
school. Known as the "Tech Prep" program, this unique approach further 
develops career paths for high school students, maximizes student interest to 
obtain advanced degrees in emerging technical areas, and assures students a 
career educational path that is both relevant and rewarding. Industry 
leaders and educational professionals throughout the United States have 
applauded and emulated Shawsheen Tech's "Tech Prep" program. 

In addition to this innovative program, Shawsheen Tech expanded its 
partnership with area institutions in 2000 by developing a dual -enrollment 
program with Middlesex Community College. Underwritten by the Department of 
Education, this program allows students to receive both high school and 
college credit for after school courses taken at Middlesex Community College 
in Bedford, MA. Sixteen upper class students have taken foreign language 
courses at Middlesex Community College. 



-104- 



Committed to Student Interests and Special Talents 

Three hundred and twenty of three hundred and ninety ninth-grade applicants 
entered Shawsheen Tech last fall as inquisitive learners. Interest in 
attending Shawsheen Tech is so high that the school found it necessary to 
establish a waiting list of students for the first time in a decade. 
Shawsheen Tech students attend vocational/technical classes and academic 
classes during alternate weeks. Commencing at the beginning of the school 
year, the initial ninth-grade vocational/technical experience comprises the 
exploration of fourteen of this school's nineteen vocational/technical 
occupations. Parents and students are entitled to select eight of the 
fourteen explorations. All students at Shawsheen Valley Technical High 
School participate in challenging academic and vocational technical course 
work appropriate for future aspirations. The career preparatory focus of 
Shawsheen Tech's educational program includes college preparatory course 
work . 

During April of their freshmen year, students select a vocational/technical 
profession in which they will major for the next three and a quarter years. 
Those who select plumbing or electrical will earn at least fifteen hundred 
hours towards their requirement for a journeyman's license after graduating 
from high school. Those who select cosmetology will acquire the thousand- 
hour trade experience needed to take the state examination. Program 
offerings range from highly technical (e.g. health careers, 

telecommunications, and electrical) to challenging vocational (e.g. culinary 
arts, graphic arts, and Welding) programs. The public is invited to contact 
the Guidance Department at (978) 671-3613 for a catalog of Shawsheen Tech's 
diverse program 
offerings . 

By the fall of their 
senior year, many 
students begin 
initial employment as 
either apprentices or 
co-op interns with 
local companies 
during their shop 
week. Over three 
hundred area 
businesspersons serve 
on Shawsheen Tech's 
Craft Advisory 
Committees ensuring 
our curriculum, 
content, and 
technology is up to 
date. The local 
businesspersons who 
meet twice each year 
with Shawsheen Tech 
administrators are 
among the first to 
hire graduates from 
programs that they 
have had a part in 
developing . 




Wilmington resident and Shawsheen Tech student Adeline Havens accepts her Student of the Month 
Award from Principal Robert Cunningham. 



-105- 



Shawsheen Tech students participate in a wide variety of extra curricular 
activities such as the National Honor Society, the School Yearbook, the 
Student Newspaper, the World Wide Web Club, Peer Leaders and the Student 
Council. Providing opportunities for students to showcase their vocational 
technical skills at local, state, national and international competitions, 
Skills USA VICA is the most popular co-curricula activity. Fourteen students 
participated in the national competition in Kansas City in late June of 2000. 
Culinary Arts student, Mary Theresa Tringale, a resident of Billerica, was 
elected President of the Massachusetts VICA for the 2000-2001 school year. 

During the 1999-2000 academic year, over 345 students participated in 
interscholastic athletics, capturing Commonwealth Conference Championships in 
Softball, football, basketball and cheerleading . In addition to league 
championships, the football and basketball cheerleading squads won the State 
Division II North titles. The spring track team won the freshman/ sophomore 
league meet championship. The girls' swim team won the league meet 
championship. The boys' soccer, girls' basketball, boys' basketball and 
Softball teams qualified for state tournament play. 

In individual competition, 145 -pound wrestler Robert Cassidy, a resident of 
Billerica, won the Division I State title and the All-State title and 
finished second in the New England Tournament. Cassidy was afforded a major 
scholarship and was admitted to Brown University in the fall of 2000. 

Shawsheen Tech was the recipient of the Nathan Aldrich Memorial Award from 
the Basketball Referees' Association as the school that most exemplifies the 
highest degree of sportsmanship, character and ethics among its players, 
coaches and spectators in the conduct of its basketball program. 

Shawsheen Tech continues to assess individual learning progress internally 
through the administration of standardized testing, final examinations and 
performance assessments. Shawsheen Tech leads the way in advocating for a 
national assessment that will recognize the attainment of occupational 
knowledge and skills. Members of the school leadership team are actively 
engaged in the creation of occupational -prof iciency and occupational -mastery 
standards that will provide evidence of learning progress and the graduation 
eligibility for students enrolled in vocational technical schools. 

During the 1999-2000 school year, the School Council, co-chaired by Assistant 
Superintendent -Director/Principal Robert Cunningham and parent Bonny Smith, 
approved the initial school budget prior to submission to the School 
Committee and endorsed a new School Improvement Plan detailing Shawsheen 
Tech's curriculum standards, student attitudes for success, guidance 
services, communication, parent involvement and building needs. Minor 
language changes regarding discipline policy and procedures were made in the 
student handbook. Thanks to the efforts of the School Council, the school 
store has become fully operational and is now visited daily by parents, staff 
and students. The store was particularly active during the holiday season. 
The Council had recommended landscaping the school property, which has vastly 
improved its appearance. Mr. Cunningham greatly appreciates the tireless 
efforts of the School Council members, particularly parent Bonny Smith and 
English teacher Margarida Mello. 

Professional Development is a year-round program at Shawsheen Tech. The 
staff is surveyed every February for input on school needs. The Professional 
Development Committee meets to design a one-year plan for the School 
Committee's approval in April of each school year. The past three years 
Shawsheen Tech held a four-day Summer Institute Training Program. Over 
eighty teachers participated each summer. 



student Services expanded its staff during the past three years with the 
addition of a social worker in the Dean of Students' office and an 
alternative education coordinator. 

Shawsheen Tech is the only high school in the area offering students' dances 
on a regular basis. We recognized over six hundred students and their 
families last year in our Citizenship Banquet Program. We hold a ninth and 
tenth grade parent social at the Elks' Club in Billerica at the beginning of 
the school year. Ten years ago we initiated an all-night senior party at the 
school following senior graduation in June. 

Special Activities in 2000 

♦ Attention continues to be paid to improving informational resources for 
parents and students. A new Career and College Planning Handbook was 
developed. The Guidance Department offered a special Career and College 
Planning night to present the information in this new handbook. The 
Program of Studies was revised with input from parents on the Parent 
Advisory Council and the School Council. 

♦ A Teacher Mentor Program was planned and implemented. Each newly hired 
teacher was paired with a veteran teacher from the staff to assist and 
support him/her during their first year at Shawsheen Tech. The Teacher 
Mentor Program was strengthened by adding a position of Teacher Mentor 
Coordinator and by including a professional development-training component 
for all teachers who wish to serve as mentors. 

♦ Collaborative decision making has expanded with working committees meeting 
. regularly during the school year to act on technology issues and 

professional development offerings. In the fall of 2000 a Curriculum 
Council was convened. This group further broadened input on educational 
improvement issues. There are eighteen voting members on the Curriculum 
Council representing all educational programs. The Curriculum Council 
meets every month. 

♦ The content and sequence of all mathematics courses was revised in order 
to improve opportunities for all students to acquire the mathematics 
skills necessary to attain state graduation requirements. All students, 
regardless of previous difficulties in mathematics, now have an 
appropriate route to challenging and relevant mathematics courses . 
Algebra I is now offered in all four years at Shawsheen Tech. A greater 
emphasis is placed on teaching algebra in context with applications to 
vocational technical programs. 

♦ Shawsheen Tech's vocational teachers and academic teachers joined forces 
to target the need to help students improve mathematics skills. An after- 
school program was designed to teach ninth and tenth grade students how to 
approach and offer resolution to the open-response questions they will 
face on the mathematics MCAS test. 

♦ Modernization and improvement of Shawsheen Tech's science laboratories 
continued. A considerable increase in active learning in science classes 
was realized as a result of these improved instructional areas. 



t 



-107- 



♦ Shawsheen Tech' s faculty members Leah Marquis and Margarida Mello were 
recognized for their exceptional educational contribution in the area of 
technological applications. Ms. Marquis and Ms. Mello receive daily 
accolades from teachers across the globe for creating web sites that 
enhance the teaching of popular literature. These two Shawsheen Tech 
English teachers were also recognized by the National Council of Teachers 
of English and invited to be present at the NCTE Annual Conference. 

♦ Efforts continue to see performing arts at Shawsheen Tech take hold. 
Erica Gemellaro, Class of 1999, performed the national anthem on her 
classical violin at a truly spectacular graduation ceremony in June. 
Piano, guitar and vocals have enriched school activities from football 
games to daily lunches. A Performing Arts Club began under the 
advisorship of Mrs. Kate Maniscalco. 

♦ Our Building and Grounds personnel undertook several major projects. 
Those included the installation of a surveillance system throughout the 
school, the facilitation of a new fitness center, and the installation of 
outside doors and roof top units. 

♦ The Finance Office instituted a new financial system for payroll and 
accounts payable. 

♦ Consistent with its history of significant innovation, the Computer 
Services Department: 

1. Experienced no significant Y2K problems. 

2. Put 75+ new computers on the network. 

3 . Concluded integration of districts copier by putting Canon Color 
Pass copier on network. 

4. Certified a network manager in Intrusion detection and implemented 
numerous security upgrades to our network, including centralized 
virus protection. 

5. Conversions of 200+ PC's to Windows 2000. 

6. Upgraded office software to Microsoft Office 2000. 

7. Implemented 4 new servers, including new financial server and 2 new 
Sun Servers 

8. Put Galileo's Universe website and CurriculumUnits.com on-line 

9. Implemented a new client/server, graphical, object oriented student 
software, including scheduling, grades, attendance, discipline, 
exploratory system, statistical analyses, testing and state of 
Massachusetts SIMS reporting. 

10. Implemented problem tracking and management system. 

♦ Graphic Arts: The Graphic Arts program is now affiliated with the Graphic 
Arts Education and Research Foundation. The curriculum has been 
redesigned to meet Print Ed standards. A new piece of equipment was added 
to the shop to allow color printing. The printer is called a Heidelberg 
PrintMaster 46-2. Tom Struthers from Wakefield was added as an instructor 
to replace Dan Grant. Tom has quickly acclimated himself to the students 
and the shop. 

♦ Technical Illustration: The number of students has been increased because 
of the high demand for the shop by incoming freshmen. A new instructor 
has been added, Mike Azevedo, who comes with a wealth of experience, from 
the New Bedford area. A new piece of equipment, called a Roland Camm - 1 
24-inch sign cutter/ plotter, was added to the shop. Students are 
actively involved in designing advertising campaigns utilizing Adobe 
Photoshop and the results are amazing. 



-108- 



♦ Internet Technology: Two of our instructors have been certified to teach 
the first two of four sections leading to national certification in 
networking by Cisco Systems with the two highest grades of the entire 
class. Hats off to Joe Guarino and new instructor Alan Warren for a job 
very well done. They will complete the next two sections in the summer. 
The students are excited and have all passed the first section of the 
program leading to their certification. The new equipment purchased in 
order to become a Cisco Academy and to run the program include: six new 
routers (2501 and 2514) , four switches Cisco Catalyst (1900 and 3500) and 
one-HP Network Test Equipment. A new networking lab has been added to the 
department in room 513 . The program in Web Page Design has also been 
upgraded. A new Tech Prep articulation agreement with Middlesex Community 
College has been established. We were fortunate to obtain the services of 
Alan Warren as a new Internet Technology instructor. He is rich in 
industry experience. 

♦ Auto Body/Automotive/Diesel : All shops in the Transportation Cluster now 
meet NATEF national standards. A new computer was added to Autobody, as 
students in the cluster must now obtain the computer skills necessary to 
check the web for upgrades on car motors, transmissions, etc. A computer 
lab for automotive students is in operation next to the related room. 
Software on automotive technology has been added to increase students' 
knowledge and keep them up to the "state of the art" technology. 

♦ Machine Shop/Metal Fabrication: NIMS sent a team to Shawsheen Tech for 
two days to see if this school met national accreditation standards . We 
were recently notified that we have met all the requirements and will be 
receiving full accreditation in the spring. A new instructor, Joe Barrett 
from Billerica, has joined the staff. He comes with over 20 years of 
experience at Raytheon and has taught at Wentworth Institute. The 
students will really benefit from Mr. Barrett's recent experience in 
industry. 

♦ Cosmetology: The Lead Teacher, Phyllis Mario, has been named to the 
advisory board for Clairol Resource Center, Creative Connection. She has 
been nominated for Who's Who in America (Education) . 

♦ Masonry: They recently acquired a Work Pro Mover to increase the 
productivity and time on task of laying brick and block for the masonry 
students. At Open House the students and staff created a beach scene with 
a beautiful lighthouse. The results showed the creative part of masonry. 
The patio area is being redone this year and the masonry students and 
staff did an outstanding job laying the brick in a creative design. 

♦ Air Conditioning and Refrigeration: Two exciting new programs have been 
instituted along with EPA exams to accommodate co-op seniors for job 
placements. In the 2000-2001 year, computer skills have been integrated 
in the HVAC Program through "Energy Management Software System 
(Computerized) Electrical Controlled Equipment." They will continue 
utilizing the technology by adding new "Manuel J. Software" this year. 
The new programs will enable our students to learn how to calculate the 
heating and cooling loads of buildings as well as designing the system for 
these buildings. New curriculum has been written for troubleshooting and 
installing new high efficiency furnaces that have arrived this year. The 
new program should result in 100% employability for students who are 
successful in the program. 



-109- 



♦ Health: A new instructor, Nanci MacKenzie from Tewksbury, was hired in 
the Health Technology Program. Nanci was a substitute teacher at 
Shawsheen Tech both in the health shop and in the nurse's office. The 
senior students are finishing their externships at area medical facilities 
and all have obtained co-op positions. 

♦ Skills USA-VICA: There were many district and state gold medalists in the 
Skills USA-VICA. Shawsheen Tech was well represented in the national 
competition in Kansas City. They were in the top 10% in the country in 
the Health Knowledge Bowl, Diesel Mechanics, the Total Quality Management 
Team and Technical Illustration. A VICA rally was held for the first time 
on the football field to give the district winners an appreciative and 
supportive send off to their state competition. 

♦ Vocational/Technical Class Day: A Class Day was held for the first time 
during Graduation Week for the seniors. At this time, shop awards were 
given to deserving students by their Department Heads. Students sat by 
shop and really enjoyed seeing awards such as the "unsung hero" award 
given to their classmates. Recognition was also given to shops for their 
outstanding community service. A tradition was started and we will 
continue this year by inviting parents, staff and special guests. 

♦ Certificate of Occupational Competency: All vocational/technical teachers 
are in the process of writing competencies for each grade level. 
Curriculum is being updated to go along with each competency and 
mathematics and writing skills are being integrated into the shop and 
related curriculum. 



position has already taken her to the nation's capital for training. The 
bakery made over one thousand pies for Thanksgiving with many of them 
given to charity. A new low calorie meal has been available at lunchtime 
for all the teachers involved in Weight Watchers. Ms. Meg Costello is the 
new Lead Teacher in the Culinary Arts Department. 




♦ Culinary: 
Mary Theresa 
Tringale, a 
member of the 
Culinary Arts 
Department, has 
been elected 
President for 
the state of 
Massachusetts - 
Skills USA- 
VICA. This is 
quite an honor 
and the first 
time a student 
from Shawsheen 
Tech has been 
president of 
the state 
organization . 
Her training 
for the 



Community 
Proj ects 



Jack Gingras and Rebecca Lord, Wilmington residents, accept University Scholar Awards from 
Shawsheen Technical School Principal Robert Cunningham. 



-110- 



♦ Habitat for Humanity of Greater Lowell, Inc.: We have entered into an 
agreement in conjunction with the Town of Billerica with Habitat for 
Humanity of Greater Lowell, Inc. to build a new affordable house. All of 
the construction trades will be involved including carpentry, masonry, 
electrical and plumbing. 

Conclusion and Acknowledgement 

The Shawsheen Valley Technical High School District School Committee, staff, 
and students gratefully appreciate the support they receive from the 
residents of the five member communities. The Shawsheen Tech family 
especially thanks the local Town Managers, Finance Committees and town 
meetings for their continued financial support, ensuring the highest quality 
in vocational technical training opportunities for area youth. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



The department provides a high level of service to the community in the areas 
of planning, conservation, housing, transportation and other community 
development activities. The department provides staff support to the 
Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Housing Partnership, Open Space and 
Recreation Plan Committee and Master Plan Committee. The Planning Board is 
responsible for administration of the Subdivision Control Act and site plan 
review, recommendations on zoning amendments and specific planning studies. 
The Conservation Commission is responsible for wetlands protection in 
accordance with the State Wetlands Protection Act. The goal of the Housing 
Partnership is to provide affordable housing for Wilmington residents through 
local initiatives and partnerships with private developers. The activities 
of each board are described in more detail below. 

Departmental goals are: 

1. To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board in its review of 
subdivision and site plans. 

2. To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 
administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act. 



3 . To provide coordinated review of development plans through the 
Community Development Technical Review team. 

4. To provide assistance and information to residents. 

5. To complete the Master Plan and undertake other strategic planning 
efforts, as applicable. 

6. To revise the zoning by-laws and zoning map to enhance the character of 
the town, consistent with the master planning effort. 

7. To revise the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development, consistent 
with the master planning effort . 

8. To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 

9. To promote environmental awareness and education. 



-Ill- 



10. To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership, including 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, monitoring 
of on-going developments and review of projects sponsored by 
developers . 

11. To develop and implement community development programs, including the 
Community Development Block Grant Program. 

12 . To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various state 
and regional forums . 

The Director of Planning & Conservation is Lynn Goonin Duncan. She staffs 
the Planning Board, Housing Partnership and Master Plan Committee and chairs 
the Community Development Technical Review Team. The Director also serves as 
the representative to the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) , the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning 
Council (NSPC) , acting as the liaison between the town and the state on 
transportation and planning issues. 

John Keeley serves as Assistant Director of Planning and Conservation and 
provides technical assistance to the Conservation Commission and the 
department . Senior Clerks Linda Reed and Joann Roberto provide secretarial 
support . 

Community Development Program 

The Community Development Program Office has been implementing a $573,365 
CDBG grant for housing rehabilitation during the past year. At the time of 
writing, 16 homes throughout the community have been upgraded to meet 
building and state sanitary codes benefiting 42 low and moderate -income 
residents. Work included structural work, roofing, electrical upgrades, new 
boilers, porch and stair repairs and window replacement. A total of 27 
dwellings will be rehabilitated by the end of June 2001. 

The town was recently awarded (December 2000) a CDBG grant in the amount of 
$598,840 to continue the town wide housing rehabilitation program. For the 
second consecutive year, funds will be available to assist income eligible 
residents for home improvements, such as electrical work, new furnaces, roof 
repairs, structural work, and plumbing. The program is slated to start early 
in 2001. The goal of the program is to upgrade 24 substandard dwellings. 
The funds for housing rehabilitation will continue to be available on a town 
wide basis, and not limited to a specific neighborhood as in 1993-94. HOME 
funds will continue to be used in 2001 as a match for the CDBG housing 
rehabilitation program enabling the town to assist three additional 
homeowners . 

The Community Development Program Office also administers the North Shore 
HOME Consortium program. Approximately $30,000 in federal funding is 
available annually to the Town of Wilmington. This is the fourth year of 
town participation with over $120,000 in funding allocated to the town during 
this time period. To date the funds have been utilized for renovating homes 
in need of repair and for a first-time homebuyer assistance program. Three 
families have been able to purchase their first home in Wilmington because of 
this program. 

Since 1991 the town has been awarded almost $2.6 million dollars in CDBG 
funding, a significant achievement given the extremely competitive nature of 
the grant and the economic health of the community. 



-112- 



Program staff available to assist with information or questions are: James 

Chaput, Community Development Program Director and Paula Barry, 

Clerk/Bookkeeper . Cliff Ageloff is under contract to serve as the Program's 

Rehabilitation Specialist. The program is located in Town Hall. 

Special Projects: 

Housing Certification 

In September 2000 the Town of Wilmington was designated as "Housing Certified 
under Executive Order 418" for the period ending June 30, 2001. This 
certification is based on the fact that the town is taking steps to increase 
housing opportunities for individuals and families across a broad range of 
incomes. It means that the town will receive priority for certain 
discretionary funds covered by the Executive Order. During the preceding 
twelve months 98 of the housing units built were in the assessed value range 
of $110,000 to $299,999 and there were 147 rental units with rents ranging 
from $500 to $1,700. Pro-active steps taken by the town include the 
following : 

• Applying for and receiving grant funds that increase the supply of low and 
moderate income households; 

• Creating a local housing partnership and participating in the regional 
HOME consortium; 

• Adopting a zoning provision that allows accessory apartments as a matter 
of right; and allowing additions for accessory apartments by special 
permit with 10 permits issued in the past year; 

• Undertaking neighborhood and housing improvements that provide a positive 
atmosphere for affordable housing through housing rehabilitation; 

• Having had five comprehensive permit projects totaling 457 units 
constructed for family housing. 

• Having developed seven units of housing; 

• Having allocated staff resources for work on affordable housing; 

• Having established an affordable housing trust fund. 

Master Plan 

Through the Department of Planning & Conservation, the Town of Wilmington is 
in the process of developing a master plan. The town hired Planners 
Collaborative, a consulting firm with significant experience in master 
planning. The Master Plan Committee has held meetings throughout the year. 
The Committee developed goals and objectives and a vision for the town with 
extensive public participation, including a town visioning workshop and river 
tour. Planners Collaborative and the Committee used a point system to rank 
the goals. A total of 100 points was distributed among the six goals. Thus, 
the list can be prioritized and the relative importance of various goals can 
be described. Goals are: 

• Protect and preserve open space and natural resources. 22 points 

• Protect water resources, including wetlands, watersheds, and local 
networks of streams, brooks and rivers. 22 points 

• Promote the development of strong town activity centers while maintaining 
a small-town feel. 20 points 

• Use innovative mechanisms to increase the stock of affordable housing in 
town while accommodating community concerns and preserving town character. 

t 15 points 



-113- 



• Encourage appropriate and desirable economic development by promoting mix 
of compatible land uses. 12 points 

• Promote internal vehicular circulation and pedestrian mobility. 9 points 

The Master Plan will be completed in early 2001. Scott Garrant and Kevin 
Brander, members of the Planning Board, serve as Co-Chair and Kenneth Lifton 
is Vice-Chair. 

The project is being implemented in conjunction with the Planning for Growth 
project funded through the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) . 
It is a joint planning effort with the towns of Reading, North Reading, 
Burlington and the Ipswich River Watershed Association. The project is 
addressing growth planning and watershed management on a regional basis. 
Recommendations include: 

• Hire a subregional Conservation Coordinator, jointly funded by the four 
towns to conduct public education and technical assistance regarding water 
conservation . 

• Purchase water from outside the basin in order to reduce summertime 
groundwater withdrawals . 

• Develop a four-town list of priority open space parcels for protection, 
based on subregional criteria. 

• Establish a subregional non-profit land trust to facilitate open space 
purchases and to receive donated land. 

• Adopt or revise open space residential development bylaws. 

The steering committee, comprised of representatives from the four towns, the 
Ipswich River Watershed Association, the Executive Office of Environmental 
Affairs and the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, has been meeting on a 
monthly basis to provide project direction. 

Planning Board 

The responsibilities of the Planning Board include review of subdivision and 
"Approval Not Required" plans; review of commercial and industrial site 
plans; recommendations to the Board of Appeals on variances and special 
permits; and strategic and comprehensive planning. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five-year 
terms. Planning Board members are Scott Garrant - Chair, Kevin Brander - 
Clerk, James Diorio, Michael Sorrentino and Ann Yurek . Richard Green 
resigned this year after dedicated service to the town. 

Subdivision Control 

Subdivision activity spiked to the highest level in several years with eight 
subdivision applications representing 49 lots. 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed the following subdivision 
plans : 



Subdivision 



# Lots 



Action 



Tanner Road & 

Greenville Street 
Wirth Avenue 
West Jamaica Avenue 



Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 



-114- 



Brookfield Estates 22 

Mary Street 1 

13 Kelley Road 1 
Amendment to Fenway Street 3 

Foley Farm Estates III 7 

Sachem Circle 8 

Cleveland Avenue 3 



Approved with conditions 
Withdrawn 

Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Pending 



Subdivisions under construction during the course of the year included 
Andover Heights, Country Oaks, White Pines Crossing, Foley Farm Estates, West 
Jamaica Avenue, Fenway Street, Wirth Avenue and Marion Estates IV. 

Streets accepted at the 2 000 Annual Town Meeting were Emerald Avenue, Marion 
Street and Somerset Place. 

DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITY 1996 - 2000 




□ # Subdivision lots 
■ ANR Plans 

□ Site Plan Reviews 



2000 



1999 



1998 1997 



1996 



The level of commercial and industrial activity remained at a high level with 
30 site plan review applications for commercial and industrial projects. 

Of the 21 "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans that were submitted, the 
Planning Board determined that 14 plans did not require approval under the 
Subdivision Control Law and were endorsed; 4 plans were denied; 2 plans were 
withdrawn; and 1 is pending. 

Site Plan Review 

There were 30 Site Plan Review applications for commercial and industrial 
property. The Planning Board approved 24 with conditions; and 6 are pending. 



Zoning 

In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, the Planning Board held required 
statutory public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map 
and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. 
Those recommendations are made part of the report of the Town Meetings 
included in this annual report. 



-115- 



Conservation Commission 

The Commission was very busy in 2000, reviewing 58 Notice of Intent 
applications. There were 296 public hearings/meetings held to review these 
applications and those filed at the end of 1999. 

The primary responsibility of the Conservation Commission is the 
administration and enforcement of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
(M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40) and its regulations (310 CMR 10.00), which 
regulate all activity within any wetland resource area and some activities 
within the 100-foot buffer zone of wetlands. Wetland resource areas include 
bordering vegetated wetland (swamps, marshes, etc.), stream banks, land under 
water bodies, land subject to flooding (floodplain) and the riverfront area. 

Conservation Commissioners are appointed to three-year terms by the Town 
Manager. Citizens serving on the Commission in 2000 were: James Morris - 
Chair, Judith Waterhouse - Vice Chair, Richard Patterson, Lisa Brothers, 
Jolene Lewis, Mark Brazell and Derek Fullerton. 

Any questions about wetlands, laws and regulations, or filing procedures can 
be directed to John Keeley, Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation. 

Statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected $15,796.25 

Notices of Intent Filed 58 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 68 

Public Hearings/Meetings Held (including continuances) 296 

Extension Permits Issued/Denied 4/0 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Violation Notices Issued 4 

Certificates of Compliance Issued/Denied 26/4 

Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 9/3 

Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Pending 49/7/9 

Emergency Certifications Issued 14 

Request for Insignificant Change Approved/Denied 21/4 

Negative Determination 57 

Positive Determination/Withdrawn/Pending 7/1/4 

Request for Amendments/ Is sued/Withdrawn 3/3/0 




Construction continues tluouglioiii Wilmington. 



-116 



Housing Partnership 



During 1999 and the early part of 2000, the Housing Partnership was active in 
the review of the proposed affordable housing development located off Salem 
Street near Scaltrito Drive known as Avalon Oaks West. In response to 
Housing Partnership and town concerns, AvalonBay significantly revised the 
design of the development. The total number of units and project density 
were decreased, the landscape buffer and building setbacks were increased, 
and reasonable traffic mitigation measures were proposed. Of special 
interest to the Housing Partnership was the commitment of the proponent to 
maintain the affordable units for a period of 90 years, instead of the 
standard 15 -year period. AvalonBay also agreed to set aside the affordable 
units for Wilmington residents to the degree allowable by law. The Board of 
Appeals approved the comprehensive permit with conditions in February 2000. 
The town addressed issues relative to the sewer extension over the past year. 

The Housing Partnership worked with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Lowell 
during the course of the year to determine the feasibility of a joint 
Habitat/town project. The Community Development Program Office developed a 
Request For Proposals (RFP) for consideration by area developers and non- 
profits to construct a single-family affordable home on town-owned land on 
the corner of Lee and Gary Streets. Habitat for Humanity of Greater Lowell 
has expressed a strong interest in this project. The project is expected to 
move ahead in 2001. Proposals from developers are due in February 2001. 

Housing Partnership members are Ghair Raymond Forest, Vice-Ghair Gharles 
Boyle, Gregory Erickson, Alfred Meegan, Jr., Daniel Paret, Daniel Wandell and 
Lester White. The Partnership meets the second Wednesday of the month and 
welcomes interested residents to attend. James Chaput, Community Development 
Director, provides staff support. 

Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee 

In 2000 the Wilmington Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee continued 
working on updating the town's Open Space and Recreation Plan. The Open 
Space and Recreation Plan includes sections on community setting, 
environmental inventory and analysis, inventory of lands of conservation and 
recreation interest, an analysis of needs, goals and objectives and a five 
year action plan. Results of the survey done in 1999, which indicated strong 
community support for open space acquisition, were incorporated into the 
plan. By year's end the Open Space and Recreation Plan was nearly complete, 
and the Committee hoped to have the draft ready before the annual town 
meeting of 2001. 

The committee is comprised of citizens and town officials appointed by the 
Town Manager who share a desire to protect open space and to provide 
recreational opportunities for the town's residents. 

The Open Space and Recreation Plan is important for several reasons. It is 
an invaluable planning tool in itself, particularly as development pressures 
rapidly reduce open space in town. Additionally, a current Open Space and 
Recreation Plan is a requirement for eligibility for certain state-funded 
grants for land acquisition. The state's Division of Conservation Services, 
which must approve the plan, requires that it be updated every five years for 
purposes of grant eligibility. 



-117- 



Metropolitan Area Plaooiog Council 



The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency- 
representing 101 cities and towns in the metropolitan Boston area. Created 
by an act of the Legislature in 1963, it serves as a forum for state and 
local officials to address issues of regional importance. As one of 14 
members of the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) , MAPC has 
oversight responsibility for the region's federally funded transportation 
program. Council membership consists of community representatives, 
gubernatorial appointees and city and state agencies who collaborate in the 
development of comprehensive plans and recommendations in areas of population 
and employment, transportation, economic development, housing, regional 
growth and the environment. The 25 member elected Executive Committee meets 
11 times a year. The ful] Council meets three times a year. Meetings are 
held at various localities throughout the region. 

MAPC works with its 101 cities and towns through eight subregional 
organizations. Each subregion has members appointed by the chief elected 
officials and planning boards of the member communities and is coordinated by 
an MAPC staff planner. The MAPC subregions meet on a regular basis to 
discuss and work on issues of local concern. Burlington, Lynnfield, North 
Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester, and Woburn are 
members of the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) , one of eight 
subregional organizations of MAPC. The community representatives of the NSPC 
subregion consist primarily of town planners and planning board members. 

This year, the North Suburban Planning Council 

• participated in the development of the new Regional Transportation Plan, 
the main document that will determine transportation investments and 
funding until 2025, by reviewing the region's existing conditions, 
policies, and growth management options; 

• discussed the implications of potential growth as shown by buildout 
analyses completed by MAPC; 

• hosted a workshop on Conservation Subdivision Design, a model study 
completed by MAPC on an innovative land use technique to preserve land 
while accommodating development; 

• held a housing forum on Comprehensive Permits with the Department of 
Housing and Community Development and North Suburban town planners; 

• started to work with the Central Transportation Planning Staff to develop 
a transportation study in the North Suburban area, focussing on suburb-to- 
suburb transit. 

In the upcoming year, MAPC will work with four North Suburban communities and 
other state and regional agencies on an EOEA Planning for Growth/Communities 
Connected by Water grant to study the implications of local master plans on 
water consumption in the Upper Ipswich River watershed. 

Legislative 

Working with state legislators, MAPC defined the parameters of a statewide 
road and bridge construction program under Chapter 87 of the Acts of 2000. 
The legislation will help to secure a more stable funding source and insure 
an annual $400 million statewide road and bridge construction program. MAPC 
also played a key role in shaping and insuring the passage of legislation 
that reformed the funding of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. 

Similar efforts this year led to the passage of the Community Preservation 
Act and reform of the Commonwealth's Zoning Enabling Act. 



-118- 



Buildout Analysis Projects 



MAPC is continuing its work with local communities on Buildout Analyses 
throughout the region. The Executive Office of Environmental Affairs has 
funded this two-year long effort and has contracted with MAPC to complete a 
buildout analysis for every city and town in the metropolitan region. The 
purpose of the study is to create an approximate "vision" in quantitative 
terms of the potential future growth permitted and encouraged by a 
community's bylaws. If the level or type of potential future development 
shown in the buildout analysis is not consistent with the community's goals 
or vision for the future, the residents may choose to make appropriate 
changes to the regulations. Many of the communities in the North Suburban 
Planning Council subregion have had their buildout analysis completed during 
this past year. By the end of June 2001, every city and town will have had 
their buildout analysis completed and publicly presented. 



sex 



SSIOO 



The Middlesex Canal Association had an active year. The Annual Spring Walk 
was held in Wilmington and the Annual Fall Walk was held in Billerica. There 
was good attendance at both functions. These walks allow people to better 
understand first hand what so many of us have tried to preserve. 

A boat ride through the Lowell canal system and a journey up the Merrimack 
River was well received. Several members attended the World Canal Conference 
in Rochester, N.Y. 

There were several lectures: Col. Wilbur Hoxie gave a presentation on the 
canals in Ireland. He showed a video of the canals and colorful canal boats; 
Martha Hazen gave a slide presentation of their canal vacation on the De Midi 
Canal in France where she and several family members rented a canal boat on 
which they lived and toured the area; and David Dettinger presented this past 
fall at the Charlestown Naval Yard a slide show and lecture on the Middlesex 
Canal in Boston after the boats were pulled across the Charles River by cable 
from Charlestown. It was brought to our attention that Canal Street in 
Boston is the route of the Middlesex Canal to Haymarket Square. It played a 
major part in the development of Boston. We hope to further bring this to 
the attention of the public by the placement of interpretive signs in the 
greenway over the "Big Dig." 

The Middlesex Canal Commission is pleased with its success this past year. 
The highlight of the year was the first open house of the Middlesex Canal 
Visitor Center in the Faulkner Mill in North Billerica in September. 
Billerica has a very active division and its members have contributed many 
hours to refinishing a large first floor section which Mr. Ronald Pare, owner 
of the Faulkner Mill, has made available to the Commission for one dollar a 
year. It will be a site for lectures, meetings, displays and storage etc., 
all in a restored mill overlooking the Concord Mill Pond which was the 
primary source of water for the entire Middlesex Canal . This winter the 
Visitor Center is getting heat and air conditioning, restrooms and a kitchen 
installed. At the present time, April 2001 is the date set for completion. 

Representative James R. Miceli and Senator Bruce E. Tarr, as well as several 
other elected officials representing the nine towns through which the canal 
travels, sponsored a bill in the DEM budget for $100,000 to cover present and 
past operational expenses. We were notified in November that this had 
passed. We are grateful. Much needs to be done. 



119- 




Betty M. Bigwood was pleased to be asked to speak about the canal at the 
Wilmington Garden Club and at a high school graduation luncheon given by a 
young man's family at the Baldwin Landing Restaurant. 

Phase II of the five phase Middlesex Canal reconstruction has passed through 
the various levels of review at the Massachusetts Highway Department and we 
expect this $275,000 ISTEA and T21 money to be appropriated in January 2001 
(it was!) . As soon as the snow melts, a fly over will be undertaken to 
delineate the actual canal. These detailed CIS topographic maps will be the 
basis for our reconstruction. Each town will have the opportunity to help 
plan exactly what restoration will be done. Craig R. Miller of Winchester 
Engineering Associates will head this project which we anticipate will take a 
year to complete. This is very exciting because Wilmington has long 
stretches of canal which can be restored as a walking/bicycle pathway. 

We continue to welcome new members to join the Association. Our web site, 
"middlesexcanal.org" is full of information about canal history as well as 
upcoming events . 




Summer at Silver Lake. 



-120- 




lespector of Beildioi 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts building, plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the 
Town of Wilmington Zoning By-law, and for maintaining all related records. In 
addition, all administrative tasks for the Board of Appeals are handled by this 
office . 

The Inspector of Buildings is Daniel Paret; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is 
William Harrison; and the Wiring Inspector is Frederick Sutter. Joan Goulet, 
Toni LaRivee and Wendy Martiniello make up the clerical staff, which is shared 
with the Board of Health. 

It is our goal to help people understand the regulations enforced by the 
Inspector of Buildings, how best to comply with those regulations, and to 
provide assistance to residents and others who have questions about homes and 
property in the town. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to 
come and see us . 







1998 




1999 




2000 


RESIDENTIAL 


No . 


Valuat ion 


No . 


Valuat ion 


No . 


Valuation 


Single Family Dwellings 


62 


$5 , 449, 000 


69 


$6,272, 773 


56 


$5 , 254 , 000 


Additions 


136 


3,538,683 


144 


4 , 041, 126 


138 


4,638,795 


Rpmodpl "1 na 


115 


929 623 


114 


834 , 94 9 


12 1 


1 , 315, 424 


utility Buildings 


17 


107 , 992 


13 


68,383 


20 


116 , 062 


Pools 


53 


307, 512 


54 


297, 841 


47 


254, 064 


Miscellaneous 


56 


162 , 954 


70 


557, 847 


62 


468, 512 




439 


$10, 495, 764 


464 


$12 , 072 , 919 


444 


$12, 046, 857 


COMMERCIAL 














New Buildings 


11 


$10, 577, 524 


2 


$228, 000 


6 


$22 , 850, 000 


Public Buildings 






2 


28, 819, 437 








Additions 


8 


2, 344, 928 


5 


608, 000 


10 


2, 561, 500 


Fitups 


50 


5, 359, 638 


63 


9, 998, 726 


51 


11, 358, 525 


Utility Buildings 


3 


134, 000 


6 


284 , 000 


3 


78, 453 


Signs 


22 


49, 470 


20 


59,338 


22 


60,225 


Miscellaneous 


9 


57, 498 


12 


1, 083, 699 


15 


356, 371 




103 


$18, 723, 058 


110 


$41, 081, 200 


107 


$37,265, 074 


TOTAL 


542 


$29, 218, 822 


574 


$53, 154, 119 


551 


$49, 311, 931 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED 


AND 












SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 














Building Permits 


542 


$156, 059.00 


574 


$129, 021.25 


551 


$236,230 . 50 


Wiring Permits 


642 


47, 114 .75 


647 


33, 352 .50 


677 


52, 280 .50 


Gas Permits 


241 


8,269.00 


237 


7, 077 . 00 


216 


6, 165 . 00 


Plumbing Permits 


291 


12 , 500 . 00 


304 


12 , 315 .00 


296 


14, 690 . 00 


Cert, of Inspection 


31 


1,368 . 00 


37 


1, 586 . 00 


32 


1, 426 . 00 


Copies 




397.00 




167 . 80 




349 . 80 


Court 









12 . 00 







Industrial Elec. Permits 


67 


9, 900 . 00 


55 


8,250 . 00 


52 


7, 500 . 00 




1, 814 


$235, 607 .75 


1, 854 


$191, 781 . 55 


1, 824 


$318, 641 . 80 



-121- 




Case 1-2000 Donald F. Corson Map 43 Parcel 4 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2 authorizing an Accessory 
Apartment for property located on 7 Lawn Street . 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 4.2. 



Case 2-2000 Julie Ann Sbraccia Map 45 Parcel 56 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for a 
garage to be 8 feet from the side yard lot line when 15 feet is required 
for property located on 2 9 Veranda Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 3-2000 Paula J. Fiorenza Map 11 Parcels 4 & 4D 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2, 5.2.3 
and 5.2.1 to construct a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
frontage, width and area for property located on Third Avenue. 

Denied - does not meet the criteria under Chapter 40A. 



Case 4-2000 Paula J. Fiorenza Map 11 Parcels 5A & 5C 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2, 5.2.3 
and 5.2.1 to construct a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
frontage, width and area for property located on Edgeworth Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 5-2000 Ralph E. Newhouse Map 23 Parcels 7F 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot A Reed Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 6-2000 Textron Systems Corp. Map 48 Parcel 73A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6.7.5 and 6.6.7.6 Ground Water 
Protection District, enlargement or alteration of an existing non-conforming 
use and the handling of toxic or hazardous materials for property located on 
201 Lowell Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of Sec. 6.6.7.5 and 6.6.7.6. 



Case 7-2000 Teradyne, Inc. Map 85 Parcels lA, IB , 2 , 2A, 3 , 5 , 6 , 16A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. Sec. 6.6.7.6 and 6.6.6.10 the 
handling of toxic or hazardous materials for storing and disposing of 
hazardous wastes for property located on Riverpark Drive. 

Granted - meets requirements of Sec. 6.6.7.6 and 6.6.6.10. 



-122- 



Case 8-2000 Teradyne, Inc. Map 85 Parcels lA, IB , 2 , 2A, 3 , 5 , 6 , 16A 

A variance from Sec. 6.3.5.2 for the height requirements for directional 
signs for property located on Riverpark Drive. 

Granted - no higher than five feet when three feet is required. 



Case 9-2000 Northeastern Development Map 41 Parcel 137A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.3.5.2 and 6.3.5.3 authorizing the 
inclusion of a directory sign within a freestanding sign which directory sign 
will exceed the authorized display area for display signs for property 
located on 2 Lowell Street. 

Granted - in harmony and general intent of Sec. 6.3.5.2 and 6.3.5.3. 



Case 10-2000 Steven Jacobs Map 52 Parcel 20 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 to 
allow an existing dwelling to remain as situated within the side yard setback 
for property located on 7 Adams Street . 

Granted - to remain as situated within the side yard setback. 



Case 11-2000 Derek Fullerton Map 55 Parcel 91A 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 
and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, frontage and width for a single 
family dwelling for property located on Beverly Avenue. 

Denied - no demonstrated hardship. 



Case llA-2000 Derek Fullerton Map 55 Parcel 91 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 
and 5.2.3 to authorize an existing dwelling to remain as situated on the lot 
for property located on Beverly Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 12-2000 Thomas P. Brown Jr. Map 91 Parcel 1 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for a 
lot having insufficient side yard setback for an in-ground pool for property 
located on 34 Concord Street. 

Granted - no closer than 13 feet from the side yard lot line, for the life 
of the pool . 



Case 13-2000 Christopher & Cheryl Nee Map 50 Parcels 80,81B 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.3 for a 
lot having insufficient width for a single family dwelling for property 
located on Ogunquit Road. 

Granted - combining two lots to build one dwelling meeting all other 
requirements of the By-law. 



Case 14-2000 



4""*^ of July Committee 



Map 63 Parcel 10 



A special permit for a carnival to run from June 29 through July 4, 2000 for 
property located on 159 Church Street. 

Granted - in harmony with the general purpose and intent of the Zoning By- 
law. 



Case 15-2000 L. A. Associates Inc. Map 10 Parcel 25 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 for a 
lot having insufficient paved frontage for a single family dwelling for 
property located on 3 3 Buckingham Street. 

Granted - with the condition that the dwelling must be fully sprinklered. 



Case 16-2000 Omnipoint Communications Map 40 Parcel 2A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8 to co-locate on an existing 
communications tower for property located on 625 Main Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of Sec. 6.8. 



Case 17-2000 Linda & David Curran Map 67 Parcel 64 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
aboveground pool to be 6 feet from the rear yard lot line when 15 feet is 
required for property located on 26 Fay Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 18-2000 Neo Resins/Zeneca Map 39 Parcel 8A 

A variance from Sec. 6.3.5.3 to alter an existing on-premise freestanding 
sign for property located on 730 Main Street. 

Denied - does not meet requirements of Sec. 6.3.5.3. 



Case 19-2000 Janice Silva Map 43 Parcel 5 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.5 (General Service Restaurant - 
indoor seating capacity of 100 seats at 240 Main Street) . 

Granted - with requested change from Sec. 3.5.5 to 3.5.4 (Limited Service 
Restaurant) . 



Case 20-2000 Daniel & Rina Watne Map 80 Parcel 43 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.3.2 and 4.2 - Accessory Apartment 
for property located on 52 Lawrence Street. 



Granted - 



meets requirements of Sec. 3.3.2 and 4.2. 




Case 21-2000 



Lisa Roche 



Map 35 Parcel 207 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
addition to be 10 M feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required 
for property located on 16 Ohio Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 22-2000 



Mark S . Murphy 



Map 8 Parcel 61A 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Winston Avenue. 



Granted 



meets requirements of Sec. 5.3.4 



Case 23-2000 



Shell Oil Company 



Map 40 Parcel 5 



A variance from Sec. 6 . 5 . 3 . 3A to construct freestanding signs totaling 92.36 
square feet when 50 square feet is allowed and existing signage is 99.18 
square feet for property located on 586 Main Street. 

Granted - with the conditions of Site Plan Review and receipt of "Grant of 
Easement" to the Town of Wilmington Planning Bead. 



Case 24-2000 Olin Environmental Management 



Map 24 & 37 Parcels 121 & 10 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6.7.7 to construct a 350,000 
square foot warehouse/distribution facility with associated parking for 
property located on Eames Street . 



Granted 



in harmony with the general purpose and intent of Sec. 6.6.8 



Case 25-2000 



Metricom, Inc 



Map 56 Parcel 122 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8 to co-locate and install four 
wireless data antenna arrays and associated equipment at the 
telecommunications tower located on 65 Industrial Way. 



Granted 



in harmony with the general purpose and intent of Sec. 6.8 



Case 26-2000 



Robert G. Scarano Map 51 Parcels 15 & lOA 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Kidder Place. 



Granted 



meets the requirements of Sec. 5.3.4 



Case 27-2000 



Margaret Moran & Ellen Gilmartin Map 84 Parcel 30A 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
addition to be 16 feet from the side lot line when 20 feet is required for 
property located on 34 Salem Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



-125- 



Case 28-2000 



Nextel Communications 



Map R3 Parcel BOB 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8 to co-locate on an existing 
monopole located on 377 Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of Sec. 6.8. 



Case 29-2000 Michael V. McCoy Map 49 Parcel 57D 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.1.2.2 to increase the 
nonconforming nature of a nonconforming structure: seeking 12.08 foot 
setback when 17.70 exists and 20 feet is required for the purpose of 
enlarging a restaurant for property located on 110 Lowell Street. 

Granted - meets the requirements of Sec. 6.1.2.2. 



Case 30-2000 McDonald's Corporation Map 44 Parcel 178C 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.4.3 for relief from parking 
requirements of 6.4.2.4 to allow parking spaces within 10 feet of a lot line 
for property located on 212 Main Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of the By-law. 



Case 31-2000 McDonald's Corporation Map 44 Parcel 178C 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.4 for the construction of a 
Limited Service Restaurant for property located on 212 Main Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 3.5.4. 

Case 32-2000 Eisai Research Institute Map R3 Parcel 401 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.6, 4.1.10 and 8.5 to conduct 
scientific research in a General Industrial Zone for property located on 100 
Research Drive. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



Case 33-2000 SLA Realty Trust Map 19 Parcel 37 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.3 to 
construct a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient width for 
property located on 2 9 Boutwell Street. 

Granted - would be less impact to the environment. 



Case 34-2000 Michael & Patricia McKenna Map 84 Parcel 17 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 8.5, 4.2 and 6.1 to expand a 
nonconforming use and to further construct an Accessory Apartment for 
property located on 11 Royal Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of the By-law. 



-126- 



Case 35-2000 Crown Atlantic Map 40 Parcel 2A 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8 to construct a monopole tower at 
an existing communications facility for property located on 625 Main Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 36-2000 



Crown Atlantic 



Map 40 Parcel 2A 



A variance to construct a communications tower within 500 feet of a 
residential zone for property located on 625 Main Street. 



Withdrawn 



without prejudice. 



Case 37-2000 



Ralph & Phyllis Tonks 



Map 19 Parcel 12 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2 for the construction of an 
addition for an Accessory Apartment for property located on 70 Aldrich Road. 



Granted 



meets requirements o£ Sec. 4.2 



Case 38-2000 



Paul P. Szymanski 



Map 64 Parcel 2 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 to 
construct an addition 34 feet from the front yard lot line when 40 feet is 
required for property located on 69 Federal Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 39-2000 



Craig S . Newhouse 



Map 9 Parcel 27 



To obtain relief from the requirements of the Official Map authorizing the 
issuance of a building permit for construction of a single family dwelling on 
a lot having frontage on a way not shown on or made part of the Official Map 
for property located on Winston Avenue. 

Pending 



Case 40-2000 



Chip Bruce 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2.7 
property located on 305 Salem Street. 



Map 97 Parcel 35A 
Accessory Apartment for 



Granted 



meets criteria of the By-law. 



Case 41-2000 



Analog Devices 



Map 47 Parcels 2/2A 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.2.8.1 for rooftop mechanical units 
to extend above the 48 foot building height for property located on 804 
Woburn Street . 



Granted 



in harmony with the general purpose and intent of Sec. 5.2.8.1. 



-127- 



Case 42-2000 



Backleaf Corporation Map 29 Parcels 1,11B 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.6 to continue to use an existing 
manufacturing warehouse building in a General Industrial District for 
property located on 10 Burlington Avenue. 

Granted - meets the requirements of the By-law. 



Case 43-2000 Michael & Patricia McKenna Map 84 Parcel 17 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 to 
construct a garage no closer than the existing dwelling within the front yard 
setback for property located on 11 Royal Street. 

Granted - with the stipulation that the rear of the garage be no further 
than 200 feet from the front yard on Royal Street on the side 
closest to Salem Street. 



Case 44-2000 Mark Nelson Map 6 Parcel 20 

Appeal the decision of the Inspector of Buildings pursuant to MGL ch 40A, 
Sec. 8 and Sec. 3.3.3 Board of Appeals Rules & Regulations, authorize the 
Inspector of Buildings to issue a building permit for a single family 
dwelling, and relief from the restrictions imposed by the adoption of the 
Official Map and request authorization to a building permit pursuant to MGL 
ch 41, Sec. 81E,F,G and Sec. 3.3.4 Board of Appeals Regulations and Sec. 25 
Inhabitants By-law for property located on 4 Poplar Street. 

Granted - relief from the restrictions imposed by the adoption of the 

Official Map and authorize the Inspector of Buildings to issue a 
building permit for a single family dwelling. 



Case 45-2000 G D Realty Trust Map Rl Parcel 118 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6.7.7 to render impervious more 
than 2,500 square feet of a lot located within the Ground Water Protection 
District for property located on 319A Andover Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of the By-law. 



Case 46-2000 Sinbad Construction Map 17 Parcel 6C 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Parcel 6C Fenway Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 47-2000 Sinbad Construction Map 17 Parcel 6A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Parcel 6A Fenway Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



-128- 



Case 48-2000 



Edward Cronin 



Map 2 Parcel 11 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 for a 
lot having 112 feet of frontage when 200 feet is required for property 
located on 29 Hillside Way. 



Granted 



with the stipulation, the lot cannot be further sxibdivided. 



Case 49-2000 



Bvale 250 Corp. 



Map R2 Parcel 23B 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.6 to allow a General 
Manufacturing Use (Indoor Breeding Laboratory for Medical or Scientific 
Research) within a General Industrial Zoning District for property located on 
250 Ballardvale Street. 

Pending 



Case 50-2000 



Walter Malatesta 



Map 27 Parcel pt 14 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot B, 56 Butters Row. 



Granted - 



meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4 



Case 51-2000 



Cellular One 



Map R2 Parcel 23B 



Amend Case #55-99 to allow the applicant to install, operate and maintain an 
emergency standby power generator fueled by an aboveground 1,000 gallon 
propane storage tank for use in conjunction with the existing wireless 
communications facility for property located on 250 Ballardvale Street. 



Granted - 



meets the requirements of the By-law. 



Case 52-2000 



PGA Realty Trust Map Rl Parcels 18D,18C,204 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6.7.7 to construct a new building 
and render the property 15% impervious for property located on Andover Street 
and Upton Drive. 

Pending 



Case 53-2000 



Jeffrey Miller 



Map Rl Parcel 6E 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot 3B, 6 Emerald Avenue. 



Granted - 



meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4 



Case 54-2000 



Jeffrey Miller 



Map Rl Parcel 6E 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot 3A, 6 Emerald Avenue. 



Granted - 



meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



129- 



TOWN MEETINGS & ELECTIONS 

Constable 

During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the 
Constable in each of the six (6) precincts. 

Presidential Primary February 14, 2000 

Annual Town Meeting and Town Election March 22, 2000 

State Primary Election August 23, 2000 

State Election - Presidential October 24, 2000 



WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - MARCH 7, 2 00 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries 
to vote at : 

West Intermediate School Precincts 1 & 2 

Wildwood Street School Precincts 3 & 4 

Town Hall Auditorium Precincts 5 & 6 



On Tuesday, the seventh day of March 2000 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., for 
the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates of 
political parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 1st ESSEX & MIDDLESEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 1st ESSEX & MIDDLESEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

MEMBERS OF THE DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 
MEMBERS OF THE REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 
MEMBERS OF THE LIBERTARIAN TOWN COMMITTEE 



The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by Town Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the 
Town Hall, Barbara Buck, Board of Registrars at the West Intermediate School 
and the Wildwood School by Assistant Town Clerk, Carolyn Kenney and all 
machines were ready with zero sheets. The results were as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Presidential Preference 
Al Gore 

Lyndon H. LaRouche,Jr. 

Bill Bradley 

No Preference 

Blanks 

Total 

State Committee Man 
Stephen J. O'Leary 
Blanks 
Total 

State Committee Woman 
Kathleen A. Pasquina 
Blanks 
Total 

Town Committee 
Anna A. Visconti 
James F. Banda 
Patricia F. Duggan 
George W . Hooper 
Alice M. Hooper 
Jay J. Donovan 
Nancy Steen 
Lorraine A. Casey 
Gerald R. Duggan 
Elizabeth D. Woods 
John C. Holloway, Jr. 
Aldo A. Caira 
Gerald O'Reilly 
Daniel C. Wandell, Jr. 
James R. Miceli 
Robert M. Ford 
William J. Dowd 
Barry J. Mulholland 
Robert J. Cain 

Members Elected (19) 



1, 196 
7 

639 
51 

37 

1, 930 

1, 021 
909 

1, 930 



870 

1, 060 
1, 930 



599 
686 
558 
445 
462 
402 
495 
468 
554 
485 
416 
623 
532 
485 
1, 066 
353 
347 
416 
737 



Presidential Preference 

Alan Keyes 

George W . Bush 

Gary Bauer 

John McCain 

Steve Forbes 

Orin Hatch 

No Preference 

Blanks 

Total 

State Committee Man 
Dale C. Jenkins, Jr. 
Blanks 
Total 

State Committee Woman 



Nancy J, 

Blanks 

Total 



Luther 



Town Committee 
Maureen E . Kuhn 
Michael E. Kuhn 
John P. Goggin 
Catherine V. Goggin 
Eleanor M. Martin 
John M. Walsh 
William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Robert C. DiPasquale 
Ruth M. Kitchener 
Joseph E. Long 
Al Meegan 

Members Elected (11) 



54 

689 

7 

1,479 
2 
1 
4 

6 

2 , 242 

992 
1,250 
2,242 



985 

1 , 257 

2, 242 



487 
433 
460 
482 
499 
514 
558 
596 
549 
452 
554 



LIBERTARIAN PARTY 



Presidential Preference 

Kip Lee 

Harry Browne 

Edison P. McDaniels, Sr. 

Larry Hines 

David Lynn Hollist 

L. Neil Smith 

No preference 

Other 

Total 



State Committee Man 
No Candidate 

State Committee Woman 
No Candidate 

Town Committee 
No Candidates 



The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. A total of 2,242 Republicans, 1,930 
Democrats and 5 Libertarians cast ballots for a total vote of 4,177. 



-131- 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 15, 2 001 



WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the 
manner prescribed in the By-laws of said town, you are hereby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs 
to meet and assemble at the West Intermediate School (Precincts 1 and 2), the 
Wildwood School (Precincts 3 and 4) and the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 5 
and 6), Saturday the fifteenth day of April, A.D. 2000 at 9:45 o'clock in the 
forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 
p.m. for the election of town officers: 

ARTICLE 1 . To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices to wit: One Selectman for the term of Three Years; 
One Moderator for the term of Three Years; Two Members of the School 
Committee for the term of Three Years; One Member of the School Committee for 
the term of Two Years; One Member of the Housing Authority for the term of 
Five Years; One Member of the Housing Authority for the term of One Year; One 
Member of the Regional Vocational Technical School Committee for the term of 
Three Years . 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said 
inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections 
and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in the Town 
Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of 
Wilmington, on Saturday the twenty-second day of April, A.D. 2000 at 
10:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was opened by the Town 
Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the Town Hall, Board of Registrar Member 
Barbara Buck, at the West Intermediate School and the Assistant Town Clerk, 
Carolyn Kenney at the Wildwood School. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 
candidates could examine them before the polls were opened. The checkers 
were prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and 
everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. and the polls were declared open. 

The results were as follows: 

SELECTMEN for three years (vote for one) Voted 

Robert J. Cain 39 Arlene Avenue (Cand. for Re-election) 1,022 

Daryn J. Marsh 51 Adams Street 432 

Mark Nelson 6 Polk Street 304 

Blanks 32 

Total 1,790 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for two) 

Susanne L. Clarkin 39 Reno Road (Cand. for Re-election) 786 

Richard J. Scanlon 37 Birchwood Road 1,254 

Blanks 1, 540 

Total 3,580 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE for two years (vote for one) 

Nora Zinan 6 Revere Avenue 1,083 

Blanks 101 

Total 1,790 

MODERATOR 

James C. Stewart 16 Stonehedge Drive (Cand. for Re-election) 1,367 

Blanks 423 

Total 1,790 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) 

Arthur Hicks 204 Deming Way Extension 1,095 

Blanks 695 

Total 1,790 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for one year (vote for one) 

Charles Fiore, Jr. 12 Concord Street 1,139 

Blanks 651 

Total 1,790 

SHAWSHEEN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE (vote for one) 

James M. Gillis 120 Federal Street (Cand. for Re-election) 1,106 

Linda T. McMenimen 14 Grace Drive 535 

Blanks 149 

Total 1,790 



The results of this election were ready at 9:20 p.m. and the elected officers 
present were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by Town Clerk 
Kathleen M. Scanlon. The total number of votes cast was 1,790 which included 
133 absentee ballots, for a total of 13%. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 2 000 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a quorum present at 11:05 a.m. (150) James Stewart, Town Moderator, 
opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. He then read the names of 
departed town workers, members of committees and boards who had passed away 
during the past year and a moment of silence was observed. He then 
introduced our newly elected and re-elected town officials. Moderator 
informed the meeting that he would take up Articles 1-19 in order and then 
random selection would begin. 

The Moderator then started to read the warrant and was interrupted by 
Selectman Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2 . To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Eugene 
Kritter, "I move that the Town Meeting hear the report of the Board of Health 
relative to the fluoridation of the Town of Wilmington's water supply." 
Health Director Gregory Erickson reported on the official position of the 
Board of Health as follows: "In accordance with the vote of the 1999 Town 
Meeting, the Board has investigated whether it should order the fluoridation 
of the water for the Town of Wilmington. As a result of the investigation, 
the Board by a split vote of 2-1 on February 15, 2000 decided that the Board 
of Health should not order fluoridation at this time. For this reason, no 
article has been presented to this 2000 Town Meeting for the continuation of 
this process." Motion to accept report, seconded and so voted. 



-133- 



ARTICLE 3 ■ To see if the tovm will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do 
anything in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass 
over this article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 2000, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 2000, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws Chapter 44, Section 17." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 5 . To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the town and the salaries of several town officers and departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George W. Hooper of the Finance Committee, "I move that 
the several and respective sums as recommended and presented by 
the Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from 
available funds and appropriated for the purpose set forth in 
Article 5, each department's budget to be taken up and voted on 
in the order they appear, subject to amendment and each 
department's budget not open for reconsideration until the entire 
budget is voted." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Voted 



Selectmen - Legislative 
Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



$ 3,000 
12 , 845 
2 , 350 
18, 195 



Selectmen - Elections 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



24, 137 
4, 625 
28, 762 



Registrars of Voters 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



1,700 
5,280 
6, 980 



Finance Committee 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



900 

7, 570 
8,470 



-134- 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 
Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



94, 017 
237, 642 
56, 825 
10, OOP 
398 , 484 



Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



66, 687 
155, 981 

22 ,275 
244, 943 



Treasurer /Co Hector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



55, 927 
117, 087 

29, 525 
2 , 500 
205, 039 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



57,435 
74, 561 
3,200 

q 

135, 196 



Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Appraisals & Inventories 
ATB Costs 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



69, 985 
79, 277 
40, 430 
40, 000 
25, 000 
4 , 500 
259, 192 



Town Counsel 

Legal Services 



94, 000 



Permanent Building Committee 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1,400 
100 
1,500 

1.400,761 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Police 

Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary- 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 



Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Lieutenant 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Dispatchers 

Clerical 

Part Time 

Overtime 

Paid Holidays 

Specialists 

Night Differential 

Incentive 



84 , 266 
66, 992 
114 , 533 
296, 608 
364 , 831 
16, 166 
68, 778 
10, 400 
267 , 525 
78,587 
11, 200 
32, 760 
223 , 991 



-135- 




sick Leave Buyback 
Salary Adjustment 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total46 



15,446 
5, 905 
197, 037 

q 

2 , 855, 025 



(At this time the Town Moderator thanked Chief Bobby N. Stewart for all his 
years of service. The Chief is retiring in January 2001. Chief Stewart 
thanked the townspeople for all their help over the years. He was then honored 
with a standing ovation.) 



Fire 

Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 



Chief 

Deputy Chief 
Lieutenants 
Privates 
Dispatch Clerks 
Part Time 
Overtime 
Paid Holidays 
EMT & Incentive Pay 
Fire Alarm Salary 
Salary Adjustments 
Sick Leave Buyback 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Public Safety Central Dispatch 
Personnel Services 
Contractual Services 
Materials & Supplies 
Total 

Animal Control 
Salary 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



82 , 188 
64 , 637 
273 , 105 

1, 219, 470 
42 , 138 
8,580 
235,000 
86, 690 
10, 025 
20, 000 
50, 598 
20, 680 
94, 350 
37,200 

2,244,661 



219, 468 
15, 000 
7,750 
242, 218 



26, 780 

4 , 600 
31,380 

5 , 373 ,284 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Personnel Services 






Superintendent 




73, 382 


Engineer - Full Time 




133, 145 


Engineer - Part Time 




22 , 598 


Highway - Full Time 




924,602 


Highway - Part Time 




10, 660 


Highway - Seasonal 




13 , 920 


Stream Maintenance - 


Seasonal 


15, 660 


Tree - Full Time 




136,434 


Tree - Overtime 




5, 510 


Parks/Grounds - Full 


Time 


191, 464 


Parks/Grounds - Overtime 


13 , 820 


Cemetery - Full Time 




100, 757 


Cemetery - Part Time 




10, 598 


Cemetery - Overtime 




8, 500 


Snow & Ice-Ex. Help/0 


.T. 


135, 514 


Salary Adjustments 




43 , 608 


Total 




1, 840, 172 



■136- 



CONTRACTUAL SERVICES 
Engineer 
Highway 

Highway - Repair Town Vehicles 
Highway - Training & Conference 
Tree 

Parks/Grounds 
Cemetery 

Road Machinery - Repair 

Public Street Lights 

Rubbish Collector & Disposal 

Snow & Ice - Repairs 

Snow & Ice - Misc. Services 

Total 

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES 
Engineer 
Highway 

Highway - Const. Supplies & Road Improvements 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 

Stream Maintenance - Expenses 

Tree 

Parks /Grounds 
Cemetery 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Drainage Projects 

Snow & Ice - Sand & Salt 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 

Total 



2 ,200 
58,250 
87, 300 

2 , 900 

3 , 000 
2, 000 
4, 100 

68, 000 
223 , 000 
1, 940, 400 
16, 245 
125, 000 
2 , 532 , 395 

1,300 
39, 000 
67, 500 
69, 400 
54, 850 
1, 000 
6, 395 
30,400 
21, 650 


27,000 
91, 325 
4, OOP 
413 , 820 



Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



34, 000 



4, 820, 387 



SEWER 

Personnel Services 
Maintenance & Operations 
Total 



50, 707 
69,325 
120, 032 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



4, 940,419 



Article 5A. Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the sum of 
$4 , 940 , 419 be appropriated for the Department of Public Works; the sum 
of $40 , 000 to be raised by transfer from the Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Account and the sum of $15,000 to be raised by transfer from the 
Interest Cemetery Trust Funds and that both amounts be applied to line 
item Personnel Services Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of 
$4,885,419 be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Mental Health 

Furnishings & Equip. 

Total 



58, 792 
132,516 
9, 125 
24 , 700 

q 

225, 133 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Salary 
Expenses 
Total 



4, 650 

80 

4,730 



-137- 



Planning & Conservation 
Salary - Director 
Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



60,438 
123 , 576 
17, 300 

q 

201, 314 



Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 
Salary - Building Inspector 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



55, 556 
81, 399 
5,325 
300 
142 , 580 

573, 757 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Salary - Superintendent 
Other Salaries 
Overtime 

Part Time - Seasonal 

Salary Adjustments 

Heating Fuel 

Electricity 

Utilities 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 



84 , 389 
733 , 978 
34 , 500 
13 , 920 
46, 322 
270, 000 
145, 000 
73 ,350 
323 , 085 




TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



2.724,544 



HUMAN SERVICES 
Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 

Expenses 

Assistance - Veterans 
Total 



6, 760 
1,750 
10, 000 
18 , 510 



Library 

Salary - Director 
Other Salaries 
MVLC 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



54, 357 
420 , 550 

27 , 893 
102 , 530 

16, 585 
621, 915 



Recreation 

Salary - Director 

Other - Salaries (incl. p.t.) 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



62 , 028 
48, 047 
2 , 800 
5,000 
117, 875 



Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



41, 109 
64 , 188 
35,555 

q 

140, 852 



-138 



Historical Commission 
Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Commission on Disabilities 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 
SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 
Schools 

General Government 

Sewer 

Water 

Interest on Anticipation Notes & 
Authorization Fees & Misc. Debt 



15, 060 
5,480 
3 , 750 

24, 290 



500 
300 
800 

924 . 242 



20, 000, 000 

2, 341,440 
22 , 341. 440 



241, 538 
122 , 398 
160, 309 

1, 674 , 288 



ARTICLE 5B. Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the sum of 
$20, 000, OOP be appropriated to the Wilmington School Department and 
that the sum of $500 , OOP be transferred from Available Funds - Free 
Cash and that the remaining balance of $19,500,000 be raised by 
taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 5C. Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the sum of 
$2,198,533 be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest and 
that the sum of $160 ,309 be transferred from Water Dept. - 
Available Funds and applied to Maturing Debt & Interest - Water 
Account and the sum of $ 543 be transferred from Water Dept. - 
Available Funds and applied to Interest on Anticipation Notes and 
Authentication Fees and Miscellaneous Debt and that the remaining 
balance of $2,037,681 be raised by taxation." Motion seconded 
and so voted. 



TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 
Insurance 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 
Veteran's Retirement 

Employee Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 
Medicare Employer Contribution 
Salary Adjust. & Additional Costs 
Local Trans . /Training Conferences 
Out-of-state Travel 

Computer Hardware/Software Maintenance 
Records Storage 
Annual Audit 
Ambulance Billing 
Town Report 

Deferred Teachers Salaries 
Professional & Technical Services 
Reserve Fund 



2 , 198 . 533 

344 , 210 
2, 990, 000 
13, PP9 
23 , 375 
247, 120 
46, 000 
7, 500 
1, 500 
89, 360 
1, 000 
16, 000 
12, 000 
10, 000 
106, 527 
25, 000 
140, 000 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 



4 , 072 , 601 



-139- 



ARTICLE 5D. Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the sum of 
$4 , 072 ,601 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve and that 
the sum of $35,697 be transferred from Water Department Available 
Funds and applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance 
Account and the sum of $204 , 167 be transferred from Water 
Department Available Funds and applied to Unclassified and 
Reserve - Employee Health and Life Insurance Account and the sum 
of $8,274 be transferred from Water Department Available Funds 
and applied to Unclassified and Reserve - Medicare Employees' 
Contribution Account and that the remaining balance of $3,824,463 
be raised by taxation." 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 22 ,208, 141 

ARTICLE 6 ■ To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital equipment, including 
but not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or 
turn in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated and to 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof: 

(a) Police Department 

Purchase of five (5) replacement police cruisers. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $112 , 800 for the purchase of 
five (5) replacement police cruisers for the Police Department, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced 
vehicles." The Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously, $112,800 . 

(b) Public Works Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement loader/backhoe . 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $80,636 for the purchase 
of one (1) replacement loader/backhoe for the Department Public 
Works, and further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of 
said replaced equipment." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $80,636 . 

(c) Public Works Department 

Purchase of one (1) four-wheel drive articulating vehicle with snow 
blower and rotary mower. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $52 , 864 for the purchase 
of one (1) four-wheel drive articulating vehicle with snow blower 
and rotary mower for the Department of Public Works." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously, $52,864 . 

ARTICLE 7 ■ To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace lights at the high school tennis courts with more energy 
efficient lights and to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $6,000 to replace lights at 
the high school tennis courts with more energy efficient lights." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously, $6,000 . 

ARTICLE 8 ■ To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to install overhead lights at the high school football field with 
requisite wires and conduit and a control panel for the lighting system and 
to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $95,000 to install 
overhead lights at the high school football field with requisite 
wires and conduit and a control panel for the lighting system. 
Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously, $95,000 . 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace windows in the stairways at the North and West Intermediate 
Schools and to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $5 , 000 to replace windows in 
the stairways at the North and West Intermediate Schools." 
Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so 
voted, $5,000 . 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to sand, refinish and repaint the gymnasium floor at the high school 
and the gymnasium floor at the North Intermediate School and to determine how 
the same shall be raised whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $26,650 to sand, refinish 
and repaint the gymnasium floor at the high school and the 
gymnasium floor at the North Intermediate School." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$26, 650 ■ 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace a section of roof over classroom areas and over the 
cafeteria at the Shawsheen School and to determine how the same shall be 
raised whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate a sum of $102 ,000 to replace a section 
of roof over classroom areas and over the cafeteria at the 
Shawsheen School. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, $102,000 . 

ARTICLE 12 ■ To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to install an irrigation (sprinkler) system for the playing fields at 
the North Intermediate School and to determine how the same shall be raised 
whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



-141- 



Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $18,000 to install an 
irrigation system for the playing fields at the North 
Intermediate School." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, $18 , OOP 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to construct a playground at Rotary Park including playground 
equipment, landscaping, bedding material, access ways and fencing and to 
determine how the same shall be raised whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $30 , 000 for the purpose of 
constructing a playground at Rotary Park which would include playground 
equipment, landscaping, bedding material, access ways and fencing." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$30, OOP . 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to supplement Chapter 90 Construction Funds earmarked for the sam.e 
purpose, that purpose being to improve the Salem Street and Woburn Street 
intersection, such improvements to include signalization, geometry 
improvements, sidewalks, curbing and roadway reconstruction and to determine 
how the same shall be raised whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of $3 8, OOP to supplement Chapter 90 Construction 
Funds earmarked for the same purpose, that purpose being to improve the 
Salem Street and Woburn Street intersection, such improvements to 
include signalization, geometry improvements, sidewalks, curbing and 
roadway reconstruction. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, $38 , OOP . 

ARTICLE 15 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to install a computerized fuel management system at the Department of 
Public Works headquarters to include new fuel pumps and a vehicle and 
operator monitoring system and to determine how the same shall be raised 
whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $35 , PPO for the purpose of 
installing a computerized fuel management system at the 
Department of Public Works headquarters which would include new 
fuel pumps and a vehicle and operator monitoring system." 
Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so 
voted, $35 , PPO . 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of implementing the second phase of the development of 
a comprehensive Geographical Information System and to determine how the same 
shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination 
thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate a sum of $120 , 000 for the purpose of 
implementing the second phase of the development of a 
comprehensive Geographical Information System." Finance 
Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so voted, 
$120, OOP . 



-142- 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for upgrading the town septage facility and to determine how the same 
shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination 
thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $125 , OOP to upgrade the town 
septage facility located on Main Street." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $125,000. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the town will vote to transfer from available funds in 
the Fiscal Year 2000 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of 
various town departments and expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the town vote to transfer from 
the Fiscal Year 2000 budget, the sum of $6,000 from Public Works - 
Contractual Services - Snow and Ice Repairs; the sum of $70 , 000 from 
Public Works - Contractual Services Snow and Ice Miscellaneous 
Services, and the sum of $4,708 from Public Works - Materials and 
Supplies - Snow and Ice Sand and Salt; the entire amount being $80,708 , 
to the following Fiscal Year 2000 accounts: 

Police - Salary Overtime $60,000 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 

Technical High School District 20 , 708 

$80 , 708 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money from available funds for the Department of Public Works, Chapter 90 
Construction Fund Account; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of $402 , 128 to the Department of Public 
Works, Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $402 , 128 

Random selection of articles begins at Article 20. At 12:00 noon a total of 
two hundred sixteen (216) voters were present at Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn as #1) To see if the town will vote to accept as town 
ways, the layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen (M.G.L. Ch. 82 as amended) and 
shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the "Rules 
and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain or 
accept as a gift such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of constructing 
said ways and for the payment of any damages from the taking of land and 
slope easements and other easements or other related costs therefore: 

a. Emerald Avenue - From Andover Street a distance of 400 feet, more or 
less, westerly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Emerald Woods and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 197, Plan 76, on June 22, 1998, and 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc., 
dated October 22, 1999. 



-143- 



b. Isabella Way - From West Street a distance of 400 feet, more or less, 
easterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Foley Farms Estate II and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 199, Plan 51, on January 7, 1999, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc., 
dated January 31, 2000. 

c. Marion Street - From Marion Street a distance of 1,133 feet, more or 
less, southeasterly to Marion Street, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Marion Street III and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 192, Plan 106, on November 
7, 1996, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by H-Star 
Engineering, Inc., dated June 29, 1998, revised August 17, 1998. 

d. Nelson Way - From High Street a distance of 800 feet, more or less, 
westerly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Evergreen Estates and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 192, Plan 19, on September 3, 1996, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Troy, Mede & Associates, 
dated September 29, 1999. 

e. Somerset Place - From Mystic Avenue a distance of 878 feet, more or 
less, easterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Somerset Estates and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 189, Plan 64, on September 
7, 1995, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc., dated November 19, 1996; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, reads the same as above, but deleting 
both Isabella Way and Nelson Drive and the addition of the amount 
of $3 00 . Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and approved as amended, so 
voted $300 ■ 

ARTICLE 21 . (drawn as #29) To see if the town will vote to raise by taxation 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee which shall arrange 
and have charge of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5 , 000 for the observance of Memorial 
Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee 
which shall arrange and have charge of said observances." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously, $5,000 . 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn as #12) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (a total of $2,250) for the purpose of 
renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars of the United States; 

b. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Wilmington Chapter; 

c. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the 
American Legion; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 



-144- 



Motion by James J. Rooney, reads the same as above. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. The amount of $750 for each veteran's organization 
for a total of $2,250 . 

ARTICLE 2 3 . (drawn as #18) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen work 
opportunities for services rendered to the town in accordance with the town's 
Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate a sum of $10 , OOP for the purpose of providing 
senior citizen work opportunities for services rendered to the town in 
accordance with the town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously, $10,000 . 

ARTICLE 24 . (drawn as #16) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to supplement funds appropriated for a like 
purpose at the Annual Town Meeting of April 24, 1999, that purpose being to 
conduct a site feasibility analysis for the expansion of the public library 
building, and to develop the architectural design schematics for the library 
building program; and to determine how the same shall be raised whether by 
taxation, transfer, borrowing, or any combination thereof; and to authorize 
the Board of Library Trustees and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply for and 
accept any federal or state aid and to receive gifts which may be available 
as contributions to be applied to the cost of the program; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $20 , OOP to supplement funds 
appropriated for a like purpose at the Annual Town Meeting of 
April 24, 1999, that purpose being to conduct a site feasibility 
analysis for the expansion and/or relocation of the public 
library building, and to develop the architectural design 
schematics for the library building program; and to authorize the 
Board of Library Trustees and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for and accept any federal or state aid and to receive gifts 
which may be available as contributions to be applied to the cost 
of such program." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously, $2P , PPP . 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn as #33) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money that would enable the Historical Commission to 
apply for a partially reimbursable survey and planning grant from the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission for the purpose of completing an 
inventory of historic Wilmington places and/or completing a structural review 
of the Harnden Tavern, and to determine how the same shall be raised whether 
by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 



Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $1P , PPP to enable the 
Historical Commission to apply for a partially reimbursable 
survey and planning grant from the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission for the purpose of completing an inventory of historic 
Wilmington places and/or completing a structural review of the 
Harnden Tavern." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, $1P , PPP . 



-145- 



ARTICLE 26. (drawn as #17) To see if the tovm will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter 
into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, without 
further appropriation, allotted to Wilmington by the United States Federal 
Government under any Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under any State Grant Program; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply 
for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the 
expenditure of any funds, without further appropriation, allotted 
to Wilmington by the United States Federal Government under any 
Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under 
any State Grant Program." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27. (drawn as #15) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to execute an extension for ten years of a certain agreement dated 
July 9, 1990 between the Town of Wilmington and the Reading Municipal Light 
Board acting on behalf of the Town of Reading which provides for the supply 
of electrical power and payments in lieu of taxes; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Selectmen to execute an extension for ten years of 
a certain agreement dated July 9, 1990 between the Town of 
Wilmington and the Reading Municipal Light Board acting on behalf 
of the Town of Reading which provides for the supply of 
electrical power and payments in lieu of taxes." Finance 
Committee recommends approval . Selectmen James Rooney thought 
length of contract is too long. Town Manager stated Reading 
Light has paid $430,000 in lieu of taxes. An amendment was 
presented to Town Moderator by Quincy Vale, 53 Washington Avenue, 
in large poster form. Amendment concerned obtaining rural 
energy, the Green Power Option. Much discussion followed. Mr. 
Rucker, Reading Light and Town Counsel, Alan Altman answered 
questions concerning deregulation and profiling of power. Town 
Moderator allowed amendment to be withdrawn and thanked Mr. Vale 
for his input and interest. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 
Yes 220 No 1 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn as #23) To see if the town will vote to continue its 
participation in the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority financial 
assistance program which provides grants and interest free loans for the 
purpose of funding an infiltration and inflow reduction and sewer system 
rehabilitation program and to authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager to 
accept said grants and to execute documents relative to the interest free 
loans as may be required; and further to appropriate said funds for 
engineering services, construction or reconstruction of sewers, sewerage 
systems and sewage disposal facilities and appurtenances and to determine 
whether this appropriation shall be raised by taxation, transfer or borrowing 
or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-146- 



Motion by Richard A. Longo, Water & Sewer Commission, "I move 
that the town vote to continue its participation in the 
Massachusetts Water Resources Authority financial assistance 
program providing for a grant of $136,790 and an interest free 
loan of $24 8,210 all for the purpose of funding an infiltration 
and inflow reduction and sewer system rehabilitation program and 
to authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager to accept said 
grants and to execute documents relative to the interest free 
loans as may be required. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 29. (drawn as #25) To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
44, Section 53E M for a Compost Bin Recycling Program and further to 
establish a spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established 
at the Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in accordance with 
M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E ]^ for a Compost Bin Recycling Program 
and further to establish a spending limit of not more than $4 , 500 for 
said account." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded 
and so voted, unanimously, $4,500 . 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E M for the purpose of receiving monies from the Environmental 
Trust or the Department of Environmental Protection to be used for the repair 
and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; and 
additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other loan repayments to 
the town from property owners participating in said program and further to 
establish a spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving 
Fund as established at the Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 
in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E M for the 
purpose of receiving monies from the Environmental Trust or the 
Department of Environmental Protection to be used for the repair 
and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; 
and additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other 
loan repayments to the town from property owners participating in 
said program and further to establish a spending limit of not 
more than $150 , 000 for said account." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $150,000 . 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn as #14) To see if the town will vote to amend Chapter 5 of 
the by-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by adding 
Section 44 as follows: 

Regulation of Automatic Amusement Devices 

Selectmen shall not grant a license for any automatic amusement device that 
presents a risk of misuse as a gaming device. An automatic amusement device 
that presents a risk of misuse as a gaming device is one that has one or more 
of the following features: 1) the device involves matching random numbers, 
patterns or cards; 2) the device accumulates more than twenty-six (26) plays; 



-147- 



3) the device is equipped with a "knock off" switch, button or similar 
device; 4) the device has a mechanism for adjusting the odds; 5) the device 
has a remote control feature that can reset the device from another location; 
6) the device is capable of returning money to the player other than the 
change for the excess amount deposited; 7) the device permits a player to pay 
for more than one game at a time; 8) each game on the device does not cost 
exactly the same amount for each player, and a player may change any aspect 
of the game by paying a different amount than any other player before or 
during the game; and 9) there is a metering device that accounts for both 
money/points in and money/points out. 

All licenses for automatic amusement devices granted by the Board of 
Selectmen shall be subject to inspection by the Wilmington Police Department 
to insure conformance with submitted application information and local By-law 
requirements. Any unlicensed automatic amusement device shall be subject to 
immediate seizure by the Wilmington Police Department. 

Any person found in violation of this by-law shall be punished by a fine of 
$200 for each offense. If any sentence, clause or phrase of this by-law, is 
for any reason held to be invalid or unconstitutional, such decision shall 
not affect the validity of the remaining portions; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, reads the same as above 
article. Police Chief Bobby N. Stewart stated this by-law will 
limit the abuse of amusement licenses. The use of gaming 
machines, which could be used for illegal purposes, will be 
eliminated in the Town of Wilmington. David Garvin, 4 Nottingham 
Drive asked questions about this by-law relative to residents. 
Private machines not licensed owned by residents will not be 
affected. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Yes 220 No 2 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn as #20) To see if the town will vote to amend Chapter 5 of 
the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by adding 
Section 45 as follows: 

Effective September 5, 2000, smoking shall be prohibited in any restaurant or 
other such establishment open to the general public that sells food products. 
The operator of any food establishment shall conspicuously post such notice 
or signs indicating that smoking is prohibited therein. Any person who 
smokes in a food establishment shall be subject to a fine of $50.00. Any 
operator of any food establishment who does not comply with this provision 
shall be subject to a fine of $50.00; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Eugene Kritter, reads the same as above. Motion by 
Rocco DePasquale, "I move to amend Article 32, Effective 
September 5, 2000 smoking in full service restaurants with one 
hundred (100) or more seats shall be restricted to a designated 
smoking area, not more than 3 0% of the seating capacity. Smoking 
shall be prohibited in any restaurants with less than one hundred 
(100) seating." Motion seconded. Much discussion was heard both 
for and against smoking and in support of the amendment. Finance 
Committee recommends approval on main motion. Vote on amendment 
was Yes 50 No 99. Vote on main motion was Yes 93 No 48. 
Article approved. 



-148- 



ARTICLE 33. (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to amend the Accessory- 
Apartment provision of the Zoning By-law by taking the following actions: 

(1) Amend Section 3.3.2 Accessory Apartments by deleting the phrase prior 
to January 1, 1992 and substituting the phrase for five years from the 
date of initial occupancy, 

(2) Amend Section 4.2 by adding the phrase existing for five years from the 
date of initial occupancy after the phrase single family dwelling. 

(3) Amend Section 4.2.2 by deleting the phrase shall be a minimum of 750 
square feet and so that it reads as follows : The floor area of the 
accessory apartment shall not exceed 1,250 square feet. 

(4) Eliminate Section 4.2.7(a). 

(5) Amend sections 4.2.8 and 4.2.9 by deleting the words Building Inspector 
and substituting the words Inspector of Buildings. 

(6) Amend Section 4.2.10 by deleting the words Building Commissioner and 
substituting the words Inspector of Buildings; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Diorio, Planning Board reads the same as above. 

Mr. Kevin MacDonald, introduced motion at this time to reconsider 
Article 8. After listening to problems concerning water he thought 
money might be better spent than on lights at football field. Motion 
to reconsider, voice vote. Motion fails. 

Planning Board and Finance Committee recommend approval of Article 33. 
The purpose is to encourage the creation of accessory apartments 
through minor changes to existing By-law. Motion seconded and voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn as #21) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by amending the 
Groundwater Protection District By-law to meet Department of Environmental 
Protection (DEP) requirements for wellhead protection and to update the Flood 
Plain District By-law by taking the following actions: 

(1) Amend Section 2.1 Classification by deleting the phrases Ground Water 
Protection District A and Ground Water Protection District B and 
substituting the phrase Ground Water Protection District. 

(2) Amend Section 6.6 Groundwater Protection District by adding the 
following subsection under Prohibited Uses : 

6.6.5.8 Siting of petroleum, fuel oil and heating oil bulk stations and 
terminals, including, but not limited to, those listed under Standard 
Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 5171 and 5983. SIC Codes are 
established by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and may be 
determined by referring to the publication. Standard Industrial 
Classification Manual and any subsequent amendments thereto. 

(3) Amend Section 2.2 Zoning Map by taking the following actions: 

a) In the third paragraph, delete the date January 18, 1989 and 

substitute the date June 2, 1999 and delete the phrase and the 
Wilmington Flood Boundary and Floodway Map dated January 18, 1989. 

-149- 



I 



b) In the fourth paragraph, delete the date 1990 and substitute the 
date April, 1999; and delete the provision: The boundaries of the 
GWPO are also delineated onto a set of Assessor's Maps kept at the 
Town Hall; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Diorio, Planning Board reads the same as above. 
Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend approval. The 
Planning and Conservation Departments submitted this 
"housekeeping" article to meet Department of Environmental 
Protection (DEP) and FEMA requirements. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 35. (drawn as #36) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land 
owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation 
Commission. Said parcel is described as Map 50, Parcel 104A; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain 
parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to 
the Conservation Commission. Said parcel is described as Map 50, 
Parcel 104A." Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend approval. 
The nine-acre parcel off Wildwood Street is wetlands and located near 
Mill Brook. This is part of the Planning and Conservation Department's 
continuing effort each year to identify town-owned land for transfer to 
the Conservation Commission. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn as #10) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the purpose of testing all public and 
private water wells (permission needed for private wells) , and to direct the 
Selectmen to have such tests performed within a year of passage of the 
article. The Selectmen shall direct that if any hazardous or toxic material 
is discovered as a result of the testing that the source of contamination be 
made known, and that the Groundwater Protection By-law be enforced; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Gerald O'Reilly, "I move the town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the purpose of testing all 
public and private wells (permission needed for private wells) , 
and to have such tests performed. The Selectmen shall direct 
that if any hazardous or toxic material is discovered as a result 
of the testing that the source of contamination be made known, 
and that the Ground Water Protection By-law be enforced; or do 
anything in relation thereto." Motion seconded. Much discussion 
was held regarding quality of water in town. Officials explained 
water is continuously tested and is safe. Residents urged all to 
work together to make sure water is safe. Town Counsel, Alan 
Altman stated Town Meeting has no legal authority to authorize 
the spending of public funds for private purposes. Finance 
Committee recommends disapproval . Vote taken and article 
defeated, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 37. (drawn as #26) To see if the town will vote to instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to place on the ballot at the November 7, 2000 polls, the 
following question: 



-150- 



"Shall the Town of Wilmington amend and revise the present Town Charter and 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington and establish a Charter 
Commission and Planning Board to be elected by the voters of the Town of 
Wilmington?" Yes or No; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion made by Robert J. Cain, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted. Petitioner was not 
present . 

ARTICLE 38. (drawn 38) To see if the town will vote to instruct the Board of 
Selectmen to place on the ballot at the November 7, 2000 polls, the following 
question : 

"Shall the Town of Wilmington amend and revise the present Town Charter and 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington and establish a Charter 
Commission and amend the Town Charter to a representative form of Town 
Meeting to be elected by the voters of the Town of Wilmington?" Yes or No; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira to pass over made and seconded. So 
voted. Petitioner was not present. 

ARTICLE 39. (drawn as #37) To see if the town will vote to instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to place on the ballot at the November 7, 2000 polls, the 
following question: 

"Shall the Town of Wilmington amend and revise the present Town Charter and 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington and establish a Charter 
Commission and Finance Committee to be elected by the voters of the Town of 
Wilmington?" Yes or No; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira to pass over made and seconded. So 
voted. Petitioner was not present. 

ARTICLE 40. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to place on the ballot at the November 7, 2000 polls, the 
following question: 

"Shall the Town of Wilmington adopt residency restrictions on all town boards 
and commissions with chairman term limits not to exceed two consecutive 
terms?" Yes or No; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira to pass over made and seconded. So 
voted. Town Moderator informed Town Meeting, petitioner was ill 
and not able to be present . 

ARTICLE 41. (drawn as #24) To see if the town will vote to instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to place on the ballot at the November 7, 2000 polls, the 
following question: 

"Shall the Town of Wilmington fluoridate the town water supply?" Yes or No; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira to pass over made and seconded. So 
voted. Petitioner was ill and not able to attend. 



-151- 



ARTICLE 42. (dravm as #34) To see if the town will vote to establish a 
disabled veterans tax work-off program and raise and appropriate a sum of 
$10,000 for the purpose of providing disabled veterans work opportunities for 
services rendered to the town in accordance with said program; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira to pass over made and seconded. So 
voted. Petitioner was ill and not able to attend. 

ARTICLE 43. (drawn as #28) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that Edward 
P. Sheridan be allowed to take the civil service Police Department entrance 
examination notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law or 
rule or regulation to the contrary regulating the maximum age of applicants 
for appointments as police officers to be eligible for appointment as a 
police officer in said town and provided he meets all other requirements, he 
shall be eligible for certification and appointment to the police department 
of the Town of Wilmington; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Edward P. Sheridan, "To see if Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize 
that Edward P. Sheridan be allowed to be eligible for placement on the 
current civil service Police Department entrance examination list 
notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law or rule or 
regulation to the contrary regulating the maximum age of applicants for 
appointments as police officers to be eligible for appointment as a 
police officer in said town and provided he meets all other 
requirements, he shall be eligible for certification and appointment to 
the police department of the Town of Wilmington." Mr. Sheridan was 
informed by Moderator, James Stewart that the amendment is out of order 
since scope of his amendment is more than the original article. The 
original motion was then voted on. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 44. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to add an amendment to 
the town by-laws to restrict building construction to the hours of 7:00 a.m. 
- 6:00 p.m. on weekdays and 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Susan Earls, 60 Butters Row, wished to establish by-law 
so that construction cannot begin so early. She was surprised to 
find when she called police with a complaint that there were no 
by-laws in place concerning hours of construction. Mr. Marsh 
amended to 7:00 a.m. on weekdays and 8:00 a.m. Saturday and 
Sunday, with no time to stop. Town Manager advised that this by- 
law may be well intentioned, but we must be careful of this 
restriction. It could even limit simple home repair projects. 
Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Amendment defeated by 
voice vote. Main motion also defeated by voice vote. Mrs. Earls 
was instructed by both Police Chief and Town Manager to call 
police with noise complaints and they would take action. 

ARTICLE 45. (drawn as #32) To see if the town will vote to change the date of 
the Annual Town Meeting to the last Saturday in March; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion made by Robert J. Cain, to pass over this article. 
Petitioner was not present. Mr. K. Lifton, 7 Birch Rd. inquired, 
as to why town officials did not want to take up this article? 
Town Manager explained this change is a problem in the 
preparation of the budget, which must be presented to the Board 
of Selectmen ninety days before Town Meeting. Motion seconded 
and voted to pass over. 



-152- 



ARTICLE 46. (drawn as #31) To see if the town will vote to establish an 
Open Space and Recreation Account for the purpose of acquiring land for 
the open space and recreation needs of the Town of Wilmington and its 
inhabitants, and further to see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money for such purposes and to determine how the same shall be 
raised whether by transfer from available funds, taxation, borrowing, 
gifts and donations, or by any combination thereof; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Tracy A. Peterson, "I move that the town will vote to 
establish an Open Space and Recreation Account for the purpose of 
improving existing open space areas and acquiring, in the future, 
land for the open space and recreation needs of the Town of 
Wilmington and its inhabitants and further to see if the town 
will vote to appropriate a sum of $100,000 for such purposes and 
to be raised by transfer from free cash, and to accept grants, 
gifts, and donations, or by any combination thereof." Motion 
seconded. Mrs. Peterson stated the purpose of the article was to 
raise money from free cash. The town has $3.7 million in free 
cash and this is a positive indication of the town's status. A 
majority of 73% of people surveyed in town wanted more open 
space. Suzanne M. Sullivan, 60 Lawrence Street urged support. 
Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Town Manager stated 
the town has been acquiring open space. Last year at Town 
Meeting property on Wildwood Street was acquired. Urged Town 
Meeting to acquire with the support of Town Meeting not with this 
type of fund. Motion to move question. So voted. Article 
defeated by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 47. (drawn as #19) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for 
any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all 
in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 32, Parcel 8; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Stephen Bicheler, declared out of order by Moderator, 
since parcel not deemed surplus by the Town Manager. Article 
passed over. 

ARTICLE 48. (drawn as #35) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land 
owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed 
for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, 
all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 8, Parcel 64; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



Motion to pass over by Town Manager, Michael Caira, as parcel not 
deemed surplus to the needs of the town. So voted. 



-153- 



ARTICLE 49. (drawn as #9) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain 
parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to 
the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been 
determined to be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for 
the express purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with the 
General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the Selectmen be and are 
hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as 
shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 50, Parcel 63; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira to pass over as parcel not deemed 
surplus to needs of the town. So voted. 

ARTICLE 50. (drawn as #13) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-laws and zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the 
following parcel of land located in Wilmington as listed on the 
Assessor's legal file Map 11, Parcel 35; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Charles Fiore, "I move that the town vote to amend the 
Zoning By-laws and zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting 
to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the 
following parcel of land located in Wilmington as listed on the 
Assessor's legal file Map 11, Parcel 35." Most of the houses in 
this area are built on R-10 lots because of the Webber amendment. 
The land is owned by his father and they would like to build a 
single family home for his sister. 

Finance Committee recommends approval . Planning Board 
recommended approval. This parcel is located adjacent to an R-20 
zoning district. It would be compatible with adjacent parcels. 
Motion seconded and voted. Yes 240 No 2 . So voted. 

ARTICLE 51. (drawn as #30) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 20 (R-20) to General Business the following described 
parcel of land: 

The land with the buildings thereon located in Wilmington, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts and being Lot A as shown on a "Plan of Land in Wilmington, 
Mass.," dated December 22, 1970, Charles H. Moloy, Woburn, Mass., Registered 
Land Surveyor, said plan being recorded in Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds in Plan Book 120, Plan 1 and being bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHEASTERLY: by Main Street, as shown on Plan one hundred (100.00) feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY: by an unnumbered lot as shown on said Plan ninety (90.00) 

feet, more or less; 
SOUTHWESTERLY: by Old Main Street as shown on said Plan one hundred 

(100.00) feet, more or less; 
NORTHWESTERLY: by Lot B as shown on said Plan, one hundred twenty (12 0.00) 

feet, more or less; 

Containing, according to said Plan, 10,500 square feet, more or less. For 
Petitioner's title, see deed of David I. Elf man and Harvey M. Elf man dated 
July 21, 1986 and recorded at the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
at Book 3636, Page 281. The above-referenced parcel is shown on Town of 
Wilmington Assessor's Map 12 as Parcel 1; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-154- 



James J. Rooney offered the motion on behalf of John Blenkhorn, 
134A Winn Street, Burlington, MA and reads the same as above 
article. Mr. Blenkhorn would like to change this use to General 
Business. He would bring water down Main Street to this area. 
Discussion was held concerning quality of water in area. 
Planning Board recommends approval of this article. Given the 
location General Business is the best use for this parcel . 
Development for residential use is unlikely. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded. Yes 92 No 10. So voted. 

ARTICLE 52. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington 
by voting to rezone from General Industry (GI) to Central Business 
District (CBD) the following parcel of land described as shown on 
Assessor's Map 29, Parcel IIS; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, reads the same as above article. 
The reason to rezone is to allow light industry or non- 
manufacturing research & development. This would protect the 
ground water and residents of this area. Much discussion was 
held about quality of water. Mr. Woods, Water Superintendent 
stated quality of drinking water is safe and meets state 
standards . 

Finance Committee and Planning Board disapprove of this article. 
The Town will review the use of this parcel as part of the master 
planning process. Motion by Jay Tighe to move the question. So 
voted, unanimously. Vote on the main motion was Yes 88 No 116. 
Article fails. 

ARTICLE 53. (drawn as #22) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from General Industry (GI) to Central Business District (CBD) the 
following parcels of land described as shown on Assessor's Map 29, Parcels 1 
and IIB; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, reads the same as above. She 
urged voters to protect our community and vote for this article. 
This article would limit type of industrial development allowed 
on Main Street adjacent to residential homes. Town Manager 
stated this company pays over $118,000 in taxes per year. This 
article would impact the town negatively. The owners have made 
improvements to the business and will improve outside area as 
soon as the State removes construction equipment. Much 
discussion by residents and town officials, both for and against 
this article. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend 
disapproval. The town will take a proactive role relative to the 
use of this property. The owner has committed to meeting with 
the town to discuss future use of the site. Motion seconded and 
so voted. Yes 52 No 79. Article fails. 



ARTICLE 54. (drawn as #27) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington 
by voting to rezone from General Industry (GI) to Central Business 
District (CBD) that portion of land located in the existing GI zone as 
shown on Parcel 13, Assessor's Map 30; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 



-155- 



Motion by Suzanne Sullivan, reads the same as above. We need to 
restrict use of this building. People in area feel its time for 
a change to protect the residents . This is a chance for everyone 
to have control over what happens on this property. Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommend disapproval . The town 
will take a proactive role relative to the use of this property. 
The owner has committed to meeting with the town to discuss 
future use of the site. Motion seconded. Yes 60 No 77. Article 
fails . 



ARTICLE 55. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-laws of the Town of Wilmington and the associated zoning map 
by rezoning from Residential 20 (R-20) to General Business (GB) the 
following parcels of land: 



Parcel One: 



A parcel of land 
GB/R-20 zone line 
Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 

Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Southeasterly 

Southeasterly 

Southerly 

Southeasterly 

Northeasterly 

Northwesterly 



Southerly 
Westerly 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 

Southeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 

Southeasterly 



located north of Main Street, beginning at the existing 
, at land of Fred Cain, running: 
100' along Lot 134 to a point, thence 

100' along Lot 135A to a point on the sideline of Chelsea 
Street, thence 

50' along Chelsea Street to a point, thence 
240' along Chelsea Street and Lot 130EA to a point, thence 
375' along Lot 130EA, 130EB, 130EC to a point, thence 
200' along Lot 130EC to a point, thence 

145' across Chelsea Street and Lot 130E to a point at Lot 
130B, thence 

100' along Lot 130B to a point, thence 

48' across Kiernan Avenue to a point at Lot 13 OD, thence 
282' along Lot 130D to a point, thence 
360' to Lot 106, thence 

1,465' along Lot 106, Talbot Avenue, Lot 104, Loring 
Avenue, Lot 93, Lime Street, Fairview Avenue, Lot 7 9A, Dane 
Street and Lot 67 to a point, thence 
187' along Lot 67 to a point, thence 
140' along Lot 67 to a point, thence 
224' along Lot 117 to a point, thence 

100' along Lot 118 and a portion of Lot 119 to a point at 
Lot 125, thence 

309.92' along Lot 125 to a point at Dublin Avenue, thence 
40' along Dublin Avenue to a point, thence 
25' along Dublin Avenue to a point, thence 
85' along Lot 126 to a point, thence 

175' along Lot 126 and a portion of Lot 127 to a point on 
the GB/R2 zone line, thence 

720' along the GB/R20 zone line across Lot 130E, Montrose 
Avenue, Lot 130, Lot 13 lA and Lot 131 to the point of 
beginning 



Parcel Two: 



That certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington in the County of Middlesex 
and said Commonwealth, bounded and described as follows: 



Southeasterly by Chelsea Street, one hundred twenty-five (125.00) feet; 

Southwesterly by Lots 146 and 167, two hundred (200) feet; 

Northwesterly by Gardner Street, one hundred twenty-five (125.00) feet; 

and 

Northeasterly by Lots 173 and 140, two hundred (200.00) feet. 



-156- 



All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as 
shown on subdivision plan 6462-B, sheet two (2), drawn by Dana F. Perkins, 
Surveyors, dated November 1921, as approved by the Court, filed in the Land 
Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate 
of Title 1818, and said land is shown as Lots one hundred forty-one (141) to 
one hundred forty-five (145) and one hundred sixty-eight (168) to one hundred 
seventy-two (172) inclusive on said plan. 

For Petitioner's title see Certificate of Title No. 21833 at Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds Land Registration Office at Book 112, Page 65. 
See also Certificate of Title No. 14043 at Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds, Land Registration Office at Book 73, Page 85. See also Certificate 
of Title No. 21840 at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Land 
Registration Office at Book 112, Page 79. See also Certificate of Title No. 
7770 at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Land Registration Office 
at Book 41, Page 67. 

The above-referenced parcels are also shown as all of Parcel 130EA, and a 
portion of Parcels 130, 131, 131A, and 130E, all on Assessor's Map 41; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Cain, "I move to see if the town will vote to 
amend the Zoning By-laws of the Town of Wilmington and the 
associated zoning map by rezoning from Residential 20 (R-20) to 
General Business (GB) the following parcel of land: 



A parcel of land located north of Main Street, beginning at the 
existing GB/R-20 zone line, at land of Fred Cain, running: 



Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 

Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 

Northeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 

Southeasterly 



100' along Lot 134 to a point, thence 

100' along Lot 135A to a point on the sideline of 

Chelsea Street, thence 

50' along Chelsea Street to a point, thence 
40' along Chelsea Street and lot 130EA to a 
point, thence 

125' along Chelsea Street to a point, thence 
585'+ to a point, thence 

150' along lot 126 and a portion of lot 127 to a point 
on the GB/R2 zone line, thence 

720' along the GB/R20 zone line across lot 130B, 
Montrose Avenue, lot 130, lot 131A and lot 131 to 
the point of beginning 



For Petitioner's title see Certificate of Title No. 21833 at 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Land Registration 
Office at Book 112, Page 65. See also Certificate of Title No. 
14043 at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Land 
Registration Office at Book 73, Page 85. See also Certificate of 
Title No. 21840 at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
Land Registration Office at Book 112, Page 79. See also 
Certificate of Title No. 7770 at Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Land Registration Office at Book 41, Page 67. 
The above-referenced parcels are also shown as all of Parcel 
130EA and a portion of Parcels 130,131,131A and 130E, all on 
Assessor's Map 41. 

This property is also shown on a "Plan to Accompany rezoning 
petition, Wilmington, Mass., by Merrimack Engineering Services, 
66 Park Street, Andover, MA, scale 1" equals 100' dated March 21, 
2000 . 



-157- 



Mr. Cain stated this article has been reduced in area to rezone 

acres situated to the rear of a piece of property they own off 
Main Street between Kiernan and Dublin Avenues. Sewer would be 
extended down Main Street and made available to residents to rear 
and left of property. The rezoning would enable them to 
accommodate a large box retail user instead of small units, which 
would require more curb cuts. It would improve taxes and create 
jobs in this area of Main Street. Stop & Shop was mentioned as a 
chain that may be interested in such a site. Much discussion was 
heard from residents both for and against. Residents were 
concerned about negative affect on Lucci's Supermarket and 
traffic problems in the area. Planning Board recommended 
disapproval of this article due to lack of information. Motion 
seconded. Yes 108 No 144. Article fails. 

Motion made by Charles Gilbert, to recess for lunch. Motion 
defeated . 

Motion made by Kevin MacDonald to reconsider Article 55. Motion 
defeated . 

ARTICLE 56. (drawn as #11) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning from Central Business (CB) to 
General Business (GB) the following parcels of land: 

Parcel One: 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon, situated in said 
Wilmington at the corner of Main Street and Forest Avenue, a/k/a Forest 
Avenue now known as Kirk Street bounded and described as follows: 

Westerly: by said Main Street, 66.37 feet; 

Northerly: by land now or formerly of Ritson, as shown on a plan 

hereinafter mentioned, 153.65 feet; 
Easterly: by land now or formerly of Mcintosh, as shown on said plan, 

65.3 3 feet; and 
Southerly: by said Forest Avenue, 147.73 feet. 

Said parcel contains 9,900 square feet of land and is shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., dated July 16, 1935, Dana F. 
Perkins, Civil Engineers and Surveyors," recorded with Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 58, Plan 84A. 

Parcel Two: 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon, situated in said 
Wilmington on the northwesterly side of Forest Avenue, and being shown on a 
plan entitled "Plan of Land Surveyed for Church Street Hardware, Inc., 
situated on Forest Avenue, Wilmington, Mass., dated November 21, 1942, A.N. 
Fames, Surveyor," recorded with said Deeds in Plan Book 65, Plan 27, bounded 
and described as follows: 

Southeasterly: by said Forest Avenue, 108.84 feet; 

Southwesterly: by land now or formerly of Roger Buck, A. Serentino and 

Fred Husson, as shown on said plan, 219.95 feet; 

Northwesterly: by land now or formerly of Church Street Hardware, Inc., as 

shown on said plan, 108.84 feet; 

Northeasterly: by other land now or formerly of Church Street Hardware, 

Inc., as shown on said plan 219.95 feet. 



-158- 



Said parcel contains 23,939 square feet of land according to said plan. 



For Petitioner's title see deed of Ralph B. Medbery, Trustee of RAC Realty 
Trust dated April 4, 1996 and recorded at Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds, as instrument number 16923 of April 4, 1996. 

The above -referenced parcels are also shown as Parcel 114 on Assessor's Map 
41; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Letter was received from James Peterson, Counsel for William 
Bragel, requesting withdrawal of this article. Motion by Robert 
J. Cain to pass over, so voted. 

ARTICLE 57. (drawn as #8) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws of the Town of Wilmington and the associated zoning map by rezoning 
from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the following described 
parcel of land: 

Beginning at a point on the Easterly side of Elizabeth Drive and land of 
Walter and Celina Malatesta: 



N 


32° 


24 


45" 


W 


for 


a 


N 


68° 


53 


06" 


E 


for 


a 


N 


85° 


26 


42 " 


E 


for 


a 


N 


19° 


45 


57" 


W 


for 


a 


N 


70° 


14 


03 " 


E 


for 


a 


N 


18° 


51 


05" 


W 


for 


a 


N 


68° 


36 


09" 


E 


for 


a 


S 


23° 


35 


07 " 


E 


for 


a 


S 


31° 


42 


18" 


E 


for 


a 


s 


10° 


50 


29" 


E 


for 


a 


s 


9° 


06 


52" 


E 


for 


a 


s 


08° 


53 


30" 


W 


for 


a 


s 


89° 


40 


02" 


W 


for 


a 


s 


79° 


20 


33 M 


W 


for 


a 


s 


81° 


11 


20" 


W 


for 


a 


s 


86° 


04 


40" 


W 


for 


a 


s 


37° 


42 


53 " 


E 


for 


a 


s 


57° 


42 


51" 


W 


for 


a 


N 


32° 


24 


45" 


W 


for 


a 


N 


32° 


24 


45" 


W 


for 


a 


N 


32° 


24 


45" 


W 


along 
point 



distance of 7.10 feet 
distance of 165.52 fee 
distance of 64.64 feet 
distance of 61.00 feet 
distance of 111.80 fee 
distance of 227.00 fee 
distance of 190.57 fee 
distance of 130.95 fee 
distance of 480.24 fee 
distance of 123.74 fee 
distance of 125.69 fee 
distance of 14 . 15 feet 
distance of 17.00 feet 
distance of 87.75 feet 
distance of 61.30 feet 
distance of 13.95 feet 
distance of 242.00 fee 
distance of 309.64 fee 
distance of 284.67 fee 
distance of 510.31 fee 
Elizabeth Drive for a 
of beginning. 



to a point, 
t to a point 
to a point, 
to a point, 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
to a point, 
to a point, 
to a point, 
to a point, 
to a point, 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
t to a point 
distance of 



thence ; 
, thence; 

thence ; 

thence ; 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 

thence ; 

thence , 

thence , 

thence , 

thence , 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 
, thence, 
59.53 feet, 



to the 



Containing about 10.3 acres. Meaning and intending to rezone from 
Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) that land shown on the 
Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map as Map 27, Parcel 14; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel J. Brown, Attorney for Joseph Langone . The 
petitioner of Article 57 moves to amend Article 57 by adding the 
following language. All in accordance with the terms of an 
agreement entered into by and between the property owner of the 
above described parcel of land, the Developer and the Town of 
Wilmington, acting by its Planning Board, said agreement being 
dated April 3, 2000 and being incorporated herein by reference. 



Finance Committee recommends approval . The Planning Board recommends 
approval. The property owner has worked with the Planning Board and 
Conservation Department to develop a proposal for the site that 
addresses concerns expressed by the Planning Board and residents at the 
Special Town Meeting in 1999. This contract will ensure that 



-159- 



approximately 2.6 acres of open space adjacent to the Butters Row 
wellfield is donated to the Water Department and that the maximum 
number of dwellings is 10, inclusive of the existing dwelling on 
Butters Row. This agreement has been signed by all parties and 
approved by Town Manager and is a binding contract. Lynn Duncan and 
the Planning Board were complimented by Attorney Brown for all the 
excellent and progressive work put into this contract. Motion seconded 
and so voted as amended. Yes 250 No 2. Article approved. 

The attendance at Town Meeting was as follows and the meeting adjourned at 

7:08 p.m. 

11:05 a.m. - 150 12:15 p.m. - 216 

2:00 p.m. - 294 Non-voters - 40 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY 2 000 



Total 
Appropriation 

80,708 



By Transfer 
80, 708 



By Taxation 




TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY 2 001 



SCHOOL BUDGET 
MUNICIPAL BUDGET 
CAPITAL OUTLAY 
WARRANT ARTICLES 
SUBTOTAL 

STATUTORY CHARGES 
TOTAL BUDGET 



Total 
Appropriation 

22,341,440 
22, 208, 141 
808, 950 
85, 550 
45, 444, 081 
3 , 973 . 545 
49, 417, 626 



By Transfer 

500, 000 
463, 990 



963, 990 
71, 307 
1, 035, 297 



By Taxation 

21, 841, 440 
21, 744 , 151 
808 , 950 
85, 550 
44 ,480, 091 
3 , 902 , 238 
48,382,329 



CEMETERY SALES 

CEMETERY INTEREST 

WATER ANTICIPATED REVENUE 

FREE CASH 

TOTAL 



40,000 



15, 000 
480, 297 
500, 000 
$1, 035, 297 



■160- 



WARRANT STATE PRIMARY - SEPTEMBER 19, 2000 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS : In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries 
to vote at : 



West Intermediate School Precincts 1 & 2 

Wildwood School Precincts 3 & 4 

Town Hall Precincts 5 & 6 



On Tuesday, the nineteenth day of September 2000, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 
for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

CLERK OF COURTS 

REGISTRY OF DEEDS 

REGISTRY OF PROBATE (VACANCY) 



FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
6th DISTRICT 
5th DISTRICT 
1st ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 
2 0th MIDDLESEX 
23rd MIDDLESEX 
MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 
MIDDLESEX NORTHERN 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy 1,055 

Blanks 318 

Total 1,373 



REPRESENTATIVE IN 
John F. Tierney 
Blanks 
Total 



CONGRESS (6th District) 
966 
407 
1, 373 



COUNCILLOR (5th District) 

Patricia A. Dowling 609 

Mary- Ellen Manning 3 58 

Blanks 406 

Total 1, 373 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (1st Essex & Middlesex) 
No Nomination 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (2 0th Middlesex) 
James R. Miceli 1,029 
Salvatore P. Marino 173 
Blanks 22 
Total 1,224 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (2 3rd Middlesex) 
Charles A. Murphy 111 
Blanks 38 
Total 149 



-161- 



CLERKS OF COURTS (Middlesex County) 

Edward J. Sullivan 657 

Dennis Michael Sullivan 362 

Blanks 354 

Total 1,373 

REGISTER OF DEEDS (Middlesex Northern District) 

Richard P. Howe, Jr. 840 

Blanks 533 

Total 1,373 

REGISTER OF PROBATE (Vacancy - Middlesex County) 

Dean J. Bruno 64 

John R. Buonomo 2 52 

Thomas B. Concannon, Jr. 54 

Tara DeCristofaro 104 

Francis X. Flaherty 190 

Melissa J. Hurley 95 

Robert Wesley Keough 137 

L. Paul Lucero 170 

Ed McMahon 102 

Blanks 205 

Total 1,373 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Jack E. Robinson, III 177 

Blanks 100 

Total 277 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (6th District) 

Frederick T. Colder 43 

Paul McCarthy 201 

Blanks 33 

Total 277 

COUNCILLOR (5th District) 
No Nomination 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (1st Essex & Middlesex) 

Bruce E. Tarr 228 

Blanks 49 

Total 277 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (2 3rd Middlesex) 
No Nomination 

CLERKS OF COURTS 
No Nomination 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 
No Nomination 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 

Lee Johnson 22 8 

Blanks 49 

Total 277 



LIBERTARIAN 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
Carla A. Howell 
Blanks 
Total 



The three polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. 
Results were announced at 10:30 p.m. A total of 1,652 persons voted: 
Democrats 1,373, Republicans 277 and Libertarians 2 which reflects 11% of the 
14,445 registered voters. 




Shawsheen School students deciding whom to vote for in the March election. 



■163- 



WARRANT STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 7, 2 00 



WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS : In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections 
to vote at : 



West Intermediate School Precincts 1 & 2 
Wildwood School Precincts 3 & 4 

Town Hall Precincts 5 & 6 



On Tuesday, the seventh day of November 2000, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for 
the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Elections for the candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

CLERK OF COURTS 

REGISTRY OF DEEDS 

REGISTRY OF PROBATE (VACANCY) 



FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
6th DISTRICT 
5th DISTRICT 
1st ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 
20th MIDDLESEX 
23rd MIDDLESEX 
MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 
MIDDLESEX NORTHERN 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



QUESTIONS 

#1 Earlier Redistricting for State Legislators & Governor's Council 

#2 Voting by Incarcerated Felons 

#3 Dog Racing 

#4 Income Tax Rate Reduction 

#5 Health Insurance and Health Care 

#6 Tax Credit for Tolls and Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

#7 Tax Deduction for Charitable Contributions 

#8 Drug-Dependency Treatment & Drug-Crime Fines and Forfeitures 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT & VICE PRESIDENT 



Browne and Olivier, Libertarian 52 

Buchanan and Higgins, Sr., Reform 42 

Bush and Cheney, Republican 3,887 

Gore and Liberman, Democratic 5,928 

Hagelin and Tompkins, Independent 10 

Nader and Laduke, MA Green Party 445 

Others 7 

Blanks 76 

Total 10,447 * 



includes two (2) federal ballots only 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy, Democratic 6,883 

Carla A. Howell, Libertarian 1,413 

Jack E. Robinson, III, Republican 1,33 

Dale E. Friedgen, Independent 40 
Philip Hyde, III, Tiraesizing not Downsizing 46 

Philip F. Lawler, Constitution Party 145 

Blanks 588 

Total 10,445 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (6th District) 

John F. Tierney, Democratic 6,765 

Paul McCarthy, Republican 2,643 

Blanks 1, 037 

Total 10,445 



COUNCILLOR (5th District) 
Mary-Ellen Manning, Democratic 
Blanks 
Total 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
(1st Essex & Middlesex) 
Bruce E. Tarr, Republican 
Others 
Blanks 
Total 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
(20th Middlesex) 



James R, 
Others 
Blanks 
Total 



Miceli, Democratic 



6, 297 
4, 148 
10,445 



6, 563 
1 

3, 881 
10,445 



6, 616 
1 

2 , 092 
8,709 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (23rd Middlesex) 

Charles A. Murphy, Democratic 

Blanks 

Total 




Student at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center 
votes in the "Presidential Election." 



119 
617 



1,736 



CLERKS OF COURTS (Middlesex County) 
Edward J. Sullivan, Democratic 
Blanks 
Total 



6,408 
4, 037 
10, 445 



REGISTER OF DEEDS (Middlesex Northern District) 

Richard P. Howe, Jr., Democratic 6,226 

Blanks 4,219 

Total 10,445 

REGISTER OF PROBATE (Vacancy - Middlesex County) 

John R. Buonomo, Democratic 4,112 

Lee Johnson, Republican 2,568 

Diane Poulos Harpell, Independent 1,599 

Blanks 2,166 

Total 10, 445 



-165- 



Question #1 

Timing of Redistricting for State Legislators & Governors; Council 

Yes 6,858 

No 2,903 

Blanks 684 

Total 10,445 

Question #2 

Voting by Incarcerated Felons 

Yes 6,33 8 

No 2,697 

Blanks 1,410 

Total 10 445 

Question #3 
Dog Racing 

Yes 4,356 

No 5,694 

Blanks 395 

Total 10,445 

Question #4 

Income Tax Rate Reduction 

Yes 6,660 

No 3,416 

Blanks 369 

Total 10,445 

Question #5 

Heath Insurance & Health Care 

Yes 4,164 

No 5,707 

Blanks 574 

Total 10,445 

Question #6 

Tax Credit for Tolls & Motor Vehicles Excise Taxes 

Yes 4,695 

No 5,2 64 

Blanks 486 

Total 10,445 

Question #7 

Tax Deduction for Charitable Contributions 

Yes 7,285 

No 2,564 

Blanks 596 

Total 10,445 

Question #8 

Drug -Dependency Treatment & the Use of Drug-Crime Fines & Forfeitures 

Yes 4,168 

No 5,621 

Blanks 656 

Total 10,445 

The three polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. with long lines waiting to 
vote. For the first hour voting was brisk and the average wait was fifteen 
minutes. The election ran very smoothly at all polling places with just 
minor problems during the day. Results were announced at 11:45 p.m. A total 
of 10,445 persons plus 2 federal ballots for President voted. This total 
reflects 71% of the 14,676 registered voters. 



-166- 



Directory of Officials - January 1, 2001 



Board of Selectmen 



Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
James J. Rooney 
Daniel C. Wandell 
Michael V. McCoy 
Robert J. Cain 



2002 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2003 



Tovm Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



2003 



School Committee 



Stephen P. Peterson, Chairman 
Suzanne S. Cushing, Vice Chairman 
Nora J. Zinan, Secretary- 
Joan M. Duffy 
Barbara K. Breakey 
Susanne L. Clarkin 
Richard J. Scanlon 



2001 
2001 
2002 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2003 



Superintendent of Schools 



Geraldine A. O'Donnell 



Finance Committee 



George W. Hooper, Chairman 

John F. Doherty, III, Vice Chairman 

Barry J. Mulholland, Secretary 

William A. Cole 

John M. Walsh 

Daniel C. Farrell 

William J. Dowd 

Robert D. Ennis 

Paul J. Sweeney 



2003 
2002 
2002 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2003 



•167- 




Boards, Committees & Commissions 2000 



Appeals, Board of 
Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 
John R. Forrest 
David L. Spurr 

Robert L. Doucette, Associate 
Raymond N. Lepore, Associate 
Daniel C. Wandell, Jr., Associate 

Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

Anthony E. Krzeminski 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 
Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 
Bradford L. Jackson 
Ruth Kennedy 
A. Quincy Vale 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 
H. Elizabeth White, Chairperson 
Ann H. Berghaus, Rec . Sec. 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas . 
Adele C. Passmore, Publicity 
Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 

Cemetery Commission 

William F. Cavanaugh, Chairman 

Cynthia A. McCue 

Willis C. Lyford 

Community Development Grant 

Advisory Committee 

Frank A. Botte 

Joyce Brisbois 

John Doherty 

Carolyn Donovan 

Raymond G. Forest 

Michael J. Newhouse 

Michael Ruest 

Anthony Triglione, Sr. 

Conservation Commission 
James H. Morris, Chairman 
Judith A. Waterhouse, V. Chmn . 
Richard J. Patterson 
Lisa A. Brothers 
Derek P. Fullerton 
Mark J. Brazell 
Jolene S. Lewis 



Term 
Expires 

2002 
2001 
2003 
2001 
2001 
2001 



2001 
2003 
2003 
2001 
2002 



2003 
2001 
2002 



2001 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2002 
2003 
2003 



Disabilities, Commission On 

Phyllis P. Genetti, Chairman 

Charlotte A. Guthrie 

Frank A. Botte 

Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 

Richard Gage 

George B. O'Connell 

James J. Rooney, Sel . Liaison 

Elderly Services Commission 
Joseph C. Filipowicz, Chair. 
Frank J. Ratto, V. Chairman 
Henry C. Latta 
William Nee 
Marilyn K. McCarthy 
Joseph A. Paglia 
Evelyn T. Kaminski 

Emergency Management Committee 

Michael A. Caira 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Gregory P. Erickson 

Roger J. Lessard 

Michael Morris 

Donald N. Onusseit 

Daniel W. Paret 

Bobby N. Stewart 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Michael J. Woods 

Health, Board of 
James A. Ficociello, Chmn. 
Elizabeth E. Sabounjian 
Jane Ann Williams-Vale 

Historical Commission 
Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas. 
Paul L. Chalifour 
James T. Murray 
Jean M. Rowe 
Jean Doucette 
Frank J. West 

Housing Authority 

Robert C. DiPasquale, Chairman 

Charles Fiore, V. Chairman 

Dorothy A. Butler, Treasurer 

Arthur Hicks, Asst. Treasurer 

Alfred Meegan, Sec. /State 

Appointee 



Term 
Expires 

2002 
2003 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2003 



2001 
2003 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2002 
2003 



2001 
2002 
2003 



2002 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2002 
2003 
2003 



2003 
2001 
2002 
2005 

2003 



-168- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 2000 



Term 
Expires 



Housing Partnership 

Raymond G. Forest, Chairman 2001 

Charles E. Boyle, V. Chairman 2001 

Gregory P. Erickson 2001 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. 2001 

Daniel W. Paret 2001 

Lester E. White 2001 
Lynn G. Duncan, Director 
Daniel C. Wandell, Sel. Liaison 

Library Trustees 

Mary J. Deislinger, Chairman 2001 

Martha K. Stevenson, V. Chmn . 2001 

James F. Banda 2002 

Anne Buzzell 2002 

Joan S. Grady 2003 

Lester E. White 2003 



Master Plan Committee 

Kevin Brander, Co-Chairperson 

Scott C. Garrant , Co-Chairperson 

Kenneth J. Lifton, Vice Chairperson 

Robert Peterson, Secretary 

Charles E. Boyle 

Susanne L. Clarkin 

Raymond G. Forest 

James Gillis 

John Goggin 

Virginia Hahn 

Michael Hodge 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Joseph Langone 

Jolene S. Lewis 

Richard Longo 

Paul J. Melaragni 

Michael J. Newhouse 

James J. Rooney 

Beverly A. Shea 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Barbara Sullivan 

Jay Tighe 

Ann L . Yurek 



Term 
Expires 

Open Space Committee 

John B. Keeley, Co-Chairman 

James H. Morris, Co-Chairman 

Betty M. Bigwood 

Leland B. Chisholm 

Christina Grill 

Richard H. Grinder, Jr. 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Joseph M. Kennedy 

Kenneth J. Lifton 

Barry J. Mulholland 

Iva Marie Rideout 

Jean M. Rowe 

Michael J. Russo 

Beverly A. Shea 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Barbara Sullivan 

Suzanne M. Sullivan 

Ronald N. Swasey 

Mark Zinan 

Nora J. Zinan 



Permanent Building Committee 

Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 2002 

Randi R. Holland 2001 

John C. Holloway 2002 

Joseph A. Langone 2003 

Paul J. Melaragni 2003 

Planning Board 

Scott C. Garrant, Chairman 2005 

James L. Diorio 2001 

Michael A. Sorrentino 2002 

Kevin J. Brander, Clerk 2003 

Ann Yurek 2004 

Recreation Commission 

William Savosik, Chairman 2003 
C. Michael Burns, V. Chairman 2002 

Larry G. Noel 2001 

Jay Tighe 2001 

Debra J. Gray 2003 



Redevelopment Authority 

Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 2001 

Patricia F. Duggan*, V. Chairman 1998 

Paul C. Logan, Treasurer 2003 

Christopher P. Barry, Asst. Tr . 2004 

A. Mark Zinan, Secretary 2002 
* State Appointment 



-169- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 2000 



Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee 
Robert G. Peterson 
James M. Gillis 



Term 
Expires 



2001 
2003 



Term 
Expires 



Water and Sewer Commissioners 
Richard A. Longo, Chairman 
Frederick W. Russell, Jr. 
Matthew J. Kane 



2001 
2002 
2003 



Registrars, Board of 

Edward L. Sousa, Chairman 2002 

Barbara J. Buck 2001 

Alice M. Hooper 2003 
Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 

Scholarship Fund Committee 
Geraldine A. O'Donnell, Chair. 2002 

Florence J. Athanasia 2002 

Barry R. Cahill 2002 

Susanne L. Clarkin 2002 

John J. DeMarco 2002 

Robert G. Peterson 2002 



Wilmington Arts Council 

Jane M. Crane*, Chairman 2002 

David J. Maison* 2000 

H. Elizabeth White, V. Chmn. 2001 

Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 2001 

Frances D. Keough* , Corr.Sec. 2002 

Marguerite Elia 2001 

Evelyn Choate Gibbs 2001 

Hinda Paquette 2001 

Carolyn L. Stanhope 2001 

Annette Campbell* 2002 

Carmelo J. Corsaro* 2002 

Edith M. Michelson* 2002 



Town Forest Committee 
Frederick L. Jaeschke 
Forrest G. Downs 
Robert P. Palmer 



2001 
2002 
2003 



Advisory Board members 



Trustees of Trust Funds 
Michael Morris 
Lorraine P. Dineen 
M. Ronald Mendes 



2003 
2003 
2003 



170 




Boards, Committees & Commissions 2 000 



Precinct 1 



Term 
Expires 

Wilmington Election Officers 
Annually Precinct 4 



Term 
Expires 



Annually 



Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. Clk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Joan Goulet, Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Dep. Warden 
Heidi Sutherland, Dep. Insp. 
Jenna Volpe, Dep. Insp. 
Priscilla R. Ward, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 2 



Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth L. Coville, Dep. Clk 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Marilyn West, Dep. Insp. 
Anita Backman, Dep. Insp. 
Lorraine A. Hermann, Dep. Insp. 
Denise M. Kearns, Dep. Insp. 
Florence Webster, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 5 



Andrea Houser, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Dep. Warden 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Clerk 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 

Precinct 3 

Mary E . Woods , Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Minnie Kirby, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Inspector 
Patricia McKenna, Inspector 
Shirley Brush, Dep. Insp. 
Audrey E. Riddle, Dep. Insp. 



Marlene Moran, Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Judith A. Simmons, Inspector 
Mary Husen, Dep. Clerk 
Veronica M. DiOrio, Dep. Insp. 
Nancy A. Luciano, Dep. Insp. 
Melissa Nobile, Dep. Insp. 
Marion J. Woller, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 6 

Evelyn W. Conlin, Warden 
Ada Peters , Dep . Warden 
Jean M. Draper, Inspector 
Margaret L. Perry, Dep. Insp. 
Dorothy Peters, Dep. Insp. 
Jane Finn, Dep. Insp. 




Mary Woods. Warden Precinct 3. retires after 43 years as an election worker 



-171- 



Officers and Department Heads - January 1, 2001 



Accountant 

Administrative Assistant 
Animal Control/Inspector 
Assistant Town Manager 
Assessor, Principal 

Community Development Program Director 
Constable 

Elderly Services Director 
Emergency Management Director 
Engineering Director 
Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Exec. Director 

Inspector of Buildings 

Ipswich River Watershed Assoc. 
Librarian 

Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 

Mass. Water Resource Authority 
Advisory Board 

Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council 

Middlesex Canal Commission 
Museum Curator 

Northeast Solid Waste Committee 
Planning/Conservation Director 
Plumbing and Gas Inspector 
Police Chief 

Public Buildings Superintendent 

Public Health Director 

Piiblic Health Nurse 

Piiblic Works Superintendent 

Reading Municipal Light Dept. 
Advisory Board 

Recreation Director 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Treasurer/Collector 

Veterans ' Agent/Grave Officer 

Water & Sewer Superintendent 

Wiring Inspector 



Michael Morris 694-2029 

Margaret A. Tarantino 658-3311 

Ellen G. Davis 658-7845 

Jeffrey M. Hull 658-3311 

Humphrey J. Moynihan 658-3675 

James Chaput 658-9843 

Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 658-6140 

Theresa Marciello 657-7595 

Daniel R. Stewart 658-3346 

Anthony Pronski 658-4499 

Daniel R. Stewart 658-3346 

Karen DeJoie 658-8531 

Daniel W. Paret 658-4531 

John B. Keeley 694-2024 

Christina A. Stewart 658-2967 

Michael V. McCoy 658-3311 

Michael J. Woods 658-4711 

Lynn G. Duncan 658-8238 

Betty A. Bigwood 657-7870 
Richard J. Mclnnes 

Kathleen Black Reynolds 658- 

Michael A. Caira 658- 

Lynn G. Duncan 658- 

William R. Harrison 658- 

Bobby N. Stewart 658- 

Roger J. Lessard 658- 

Gregory P. Erickson 658- 

Ann V. FitzGerald, R.N. 694- 

Donald N. Onusseit 658- 

Roger J. Lessard 658- 

Roger E. Stevenin 658- 

Ronald N. Swasey 658- 

James J. Babineau (781) 665- 

Kathleen M. Scanlon 658- 

Alan Altman 658- 

Michael A. Caira 658- 

M. Ronald Mendes 658- 

Paul A. Farrell 694- 

Michael J. Woods 658- 

Frederick Sutter 658- 



5475 
3311 
8238 
4531 
5071 
3017 
4298 
2041 
4481 
3017 
5600 

4270 
8301 

2030 
3388 
3311 
3531 
2040 
4711 
4531 



-172- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates -2"^ & 4"^^ Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as the town's chief elected officials. The Board is 
responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town 
Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for 
issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer 
licenses and licenses to operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve 
on a part-time basis. 

Phone 658-3311 

Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
Robert J. Cain 
Michael V. McCoy 
James J. Rooney 
Daniel C. Wandell 

Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the town. He 
supervises and directs the administration of all departments, boards and 
commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance 
Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of 
staff and members of certain boards and commissions; attendance at all 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and 
recommend specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the town; 
representing the town in all litigation to which the town is a party; acting 
as the Chief Fiscal Officer of the town; preparation and administration of a 
comprehensive annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and 
services on behalf of the town. 

Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the town's health, workmans 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; 
developing the town's recycling program and insuring that the town meets the 
procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant Town Manager 
serves as staff director to the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; assists with 
the preparation of the annual budget and provides general assistance to the 
Town Manager in other areas of municipal administration. 

Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping 
of records and documents, the issuance of licenses and the administration of 
elections. In terms of the town records the Clerk records proceedings of all 
town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital 
statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning 
decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, fish and 
game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The clerk acts as supervisor of all 
elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 




-173- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 694-2029 



The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve town 
funds. The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all 
bills owed by the town. The Accountant maintains the complete official 
financial records of the town and prepares other financial records and 
reports as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation 
of the annual budget . 

Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property 
taxes necessary to meet appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated 
equitably on the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors 
are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal 
property within the town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market 
value, except for property qualifying for preferential assessments such as 
forest, agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: 
(1) the valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be 
raised from property taxation and (3) property classification. 

Treasurer/Collector - M. Ronald Mendes - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of 
monies due the town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and 
charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This department is 
responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Treasurer/Collector 
monitors the town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term 
borrowing. The department serves as custodian of all town funds. All 
municipal bank accounts are controlled by this office. The tax title and 
foreclosure proceedings for non-payment of taxes are handled by the 
Treasurer/Collector . 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Lynn G. Duncan - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake 
studies of land use, economic development, housing, transportation and other 
matters related to community development; compile and maintain maps, 
statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual 
proposals for development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations 
and zoning by-law; and prepare applications and administer grants related to 
planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act - Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 131, Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public 
interest issues related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, 
protection of public and private water supply, protection of ground water 
supply, prevention of pollution, protection of fisheries and protection of 
land containing shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include 
reviewing and inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with 
the town and State wetlands statutes. In addition, the department manages 
several pieces of property throughout town which have been placed into the 
town's custody as conservation land. 



-174- 



Building Inspector - Daniel W. Paret - 658-4531 



The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the town's Zoning By-law, the 
State Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department 
provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, 
contractors and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans 
and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, 
gas fitting and wiring inspections. 

Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services 
include restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings 
and schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. In 
addition, the department conducts percolation tests for the location of 
septic systems, septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds 
to citizen complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution 
and hazardous waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. 
This includes an annual rabies clinic for dogs and immunization for 
influenza, pneumonia, polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse 
provides blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In 
addition, the nurse provides home health care visits to elderly residents of 
the town. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Chief - Daniel R. Stewart - 658-3346 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention 
and extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire 
safety inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. 
All outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from 
the Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner 
installations, the storage of flammable liquids such as gasoline and the 
purchase, storage and/or use of explosives such as dynamite, rockets and gun 
powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical services to residents 
of Wilmington. Fire fighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services 
and urgent care transport . 

Police Chief - Bernard P. Nally - 658-5071 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the 
protection of people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and 
traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by-laws and 
provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Donald N. Onusseit - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, 
cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is 
responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, 
boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage 
problems, review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway 
construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the 
maintenance of the town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree 
Division is responsible for the town's public shade and ornamental trees and 



-175- 



maintenance of the trees on the Town Common. The Public Works Department is 
also responsible for the operation of the town's water supply, distribution, 
treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection 
systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed 
by the Water & Sewer Department . The Department operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal 
Environmental Agency (EPA) . 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling 
program for many household items, maintains a composting center for grass and 
leaf disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 
square feet of building space. The department provides custodial services 
for all school buildings and most of the general government buildings. In 
addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all 
of the town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the 
complete set-up at all town elections and the annual and special town 
meetings . 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Elderly Services Director - Theresa Marciello - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an 
individual and group basis. Examples of the types of programs include health 
information, educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, 
housing assistance, transportation and counseling. Additional services 
included assistance with social security and medicaid concerns. 

Library Director - Christina A. Stewart - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The 
library seeks to provide basic educational, informational and recreational 
library services. Staff provides reference and reader services to adults and 
children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information available in 
books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library 
technology to provide the means for informational access and retrieval. The 
library is a member of the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, a twenty-nine 
member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. This membership 
allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-nine 
member towns . 

Recreation Director - Ronald N. Swasey - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for 
children and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department 
include a summer swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the 
Tiny Tots program, summer recreation program for children, ladies fitness, 
day trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at 
Halloween and a number of other programs. In addition, the Recreation 
Department offers resources for travel such as discounts to Walt Disney 
World. 



-176- 



Veterans' Agent - Paul A. Farrell - 694-2040 



The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for 
veterans and their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is 
reimbursed in a large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of 
cash grants to cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The 
Veteran's Agent also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other 
programs administered by the United States Veterans Administration. 



-177- 



Board, Committee, Commission 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 
Meeting Dates & Times 

Date Room Building 



APPEALS, BOARD OF 

ARTS, COUNCIL FOR THE 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

CARTER LECTURE FUND 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM , 

ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

PLANNING BOARD 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 



iST & 3 RE Monday 9 

2"° Wednesday 

2*^° Thursday 2 

As Needed 

As Needed 

4"^ Monday 9 
^ 3RD Wednesday 9 
As Needed 
3*^ Tuesday 

2*^° Tuesday 9 
^sT ^ 3RD Tuesday 9 
2^° Monday 
1^'^ Tuesday 

2^° Wednesday 9 

3*^ Tuesday 

Monthly 

^ST ^ 3RD Tuesday 9 
1^'^ Thursday 8 
1^^ or 2*^° Wednesday 
2^° Monday 12 
^ 4TH Wednesday 9 
2^° & 4™ Monday 9 
As Needed 

Alternate Thursdays 9 



Town Hall 
Arts Center 
Town Hall 



Time 

7:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 
9:00 a.m. 



Town Hall 
Town Hall 



9:30 a.m. 
7:00 p.m. 



Sr. Center 


1 


30 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


5 


15 


P 


m 


Harnden Tavern 


7 


30 


P 


m 


Deming Way 


2 


30 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


6 


00 


P 


m 


Library 


7 


30 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


30 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


Shaw. Tech. 


7 


30 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


Town Hall 


5 


00 


P 


m 



■178- 



s 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(S) 


Acorn Drive 


from 


Oakridge Circle thru cul-de-sac 


"3 o cr 

3 85 


1998 






from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


Z , y 1 3 


lyoo 




7\ 1 ^ T /— \ O ^ "V" » /— \ ^ 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


C £1 C 

bob 


1 y / 6 




Ayoscmo jjxive 


from 


Gandalf Way 


O Q Q 

y y y 


1 y / y 




Agostino Dirive 


from 


Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


con 
b o U 


ly yb 






from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


b , / 4 U 


T Q Q /I 

lo y4 




Allgrove Lane 


from 


Woburn Street 


1 \J 


1 y y J 




7\ 1 1 v" r A T ^ n 

Axxyrovc j-isne 


from Allgrove Lane to dead-end 


A C\ 

4 J U 


1 Q Q C 

1 y y b 




Allenhurst Way 


f r om 


Woburn Street 


1,161 


1 y y 4 




Allen Pairk Drive 


f r om 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


z , J 1 y 


1 y / 1 


1 y o4 




f rom 


Shawsheen Ave to end of cul-de-sac 


T c n n 
1 , D U U 


T Q Q £r 

1 y y b 






f rom 


Salem Street 


1 B U 


1 Q Q /I 

1 b y 4 




Anaover oureeu 


f rom 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11, J U U 


1 o y 4 


1 Q "7 n 


Andrew Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 


435 


1985 




Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apache Way 


from 


Aldrich Road thru cul-de-sac 


1, 675 


1998 




Apollo Drive 


f rom 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Appletree Lane 


f rom 


Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


994 


1990 




Arlene Avenue 


f rom 


Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3 , 754 


1966 


1978 


Ashwood Avenue 


f rom 


Andover St. thru cul-de-sac 


2 , 800 


1998 




Aspen Drive 


f rom 


Russell Road thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Auburn Avenue 


f rom 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Avon Street 


f rom 


Avery Street thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Ayotte Street 


f rom 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 






from 


Apache Way northeasterly to Bailey Rd 


165 


1 Q Q fl 

± -7 -7 O 






from 


Aldrich Rd . southeasterly to Bailey Rd . 538 


1 Q Q Q 

1 J7 J7 






from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 


684 


1 Q4 ^ 

± _7 4 D 




l3a.Xa.nQ KOaQ 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


J. ^ / z 




rSo. X X ax aVdX e oU . 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1 R Q A 
J. j74 




Dd. X X ax a V a. X e ou . 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12 , 000 


1 Q Q A 


1 Q fl c: 
X -? O D 




from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1 Q c; 9 
X y 3 Z 




Ba.irba.2ra Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1 y b b 






from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1 Q 1 R 
± ^ X D 






from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1 , 005 


1 Q A. 7 




Dec L. n X ny v t: nu.c 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Ave. 


440 


1 Q R Q 

X -7 3 -7 




IDC X tlUJil L. M.VdlLi.C 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


X J7 J J 




"D A T*l C" >~i "D 3 

ricnson KOaQ 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


X J7 / X 




Bigg a IT Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1, 282 


n Q 7 c; 
X y / 3 




ISXircn KOaQ. 


from 


Birch Rd. easterly thru cul-de-sac 


345 


1 Q Q Q 
X J' J y 




DXxCnWOOQ KOaQ 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1, 197 


1 Q 
X J? 3 Z 




OXxCnWOOQ KOa.Q 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


1 Q 7 
X 27 3 J 




rSXancnaxQ KOaQ 


from 


Kendall Road 


625 


1 Q S Q 
X J? O 27 




BluebeiTiry Lane 


from 


Ashwood Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


1, 600 


1 Q Q Q 

X y y 




oouuwex X o ux ee u 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4 , 144 


1 Q Q A 

X o y 'I 


X -7 D U 


tsrana Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


510 


1 Q "J "5 

X y J J 


1 Q A "5 

X -7 ft J 


oxanQ /wenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


X -7 J J 


X -7 *± J 


II^J-aL-l^XC OUXCCL- 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 


1 , 066 


194 5 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1 , 017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 




Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1, 377 


1954 




Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1, 145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1, 653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3 , 577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 





■ ■•'ft.' 



1971 



179- 



i 



STREET LOCATION LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1, 505 


1939 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1, 268 


1960 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1, 017 


1961 


Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Ave to beyond Norfolk Ave . 


1, 411 


1957 


Castle Drive 


from 


Burlington Ave left to Burlington Ave 


1,325 


1997 


Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 


Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 


Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1, 100 


1963 


Central Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 


Chandler Road 


from 


Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 


Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1, 575 


1951 


Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 


859 


1971 


Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 


Cherokee Lane 


from 


Woburn St easterly thru cul-de-sac 


812 


1999 


Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 


Church Street 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4 ,285 


1894 


Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2 , 470 


1894 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 


Colonial Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


375 


1997 


Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 


Columbia Street 


from 


Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1, 150 


1908 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5, 803 


1894 


Congress Street 


from 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 


Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


813 


1946 


Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 


Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 


Cornell Place 


from 


Fordham Road 


747 


1982 


Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 


Cottonwood Circle 


from 


Blueberry Lane thru cul-de-sac 


280 


1998 


Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 


Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 


Crystal Road 


from 


Woburn Street to end of cul-de-sac 


895 


1996 


Cunningham St . 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Ave 


2,447 


1944 


Cushing Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


990 


1993 


Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 


Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1,760 


1964 


Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 


Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 


Dell Drive 


f rom 


Burlington Avenue 


1, 794 


1958 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 


Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 


Dogwood Lane 


from 


Blueberry Lane to Ashwood Avenue 


550 


1997 


Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1, 214 


1951 


Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1, 490 


1960 


Douglas Avenue 


from 


Palmer Way 


1, 017 


1989 


Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1, 560 


1959 


Drury Lane 


from 


Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 


Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1951 


Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 


Eames Street 


from 


Main Street to Woburn Street 


3 , 200 


1894 


Earles Row 


from 


Route 62 


820 


1994 


Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 


450 


1947 


Elizabeth Drive 


from 


Butters Row thru cul-de-sac 


1, 348 


1999 


Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1, 043 


1978 


El wood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 



-180- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Emerson Street 
Emerald Avenue 
Englewood Drive 
Evans Drive 
Everett Avenue 



from Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 590 
from Andover Street westerly thru cul-de-sac 400 
from Kenwood Drive 455 
from Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 2,071 
from Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham St. 480 



Fairfield Road from 

Fairmeadow Road from 

Fairmont Avenue from 

Fairview Avenue from 

Faneuil Drive from 

Faulkner Avenue from 

Faulkner Avenue from 

Fay Street from 

Federal Street from 

Ferguson Road from 

Fernbanks Road from 

Flagstaff Road from 

Fletcher Lane from 

Floradale Avenue from 

Flynn Way from 

Fordham Road from 

Forest Street from 

Fox Run Drive from 

Franklin Avenue from 

Frederick Drive from 

Freeport Drive from 

Gandalf Way from 

Gatehouse Lane from 

Gearty Street from 

Glen Road from 

Glendale Circle from 

Glenview Road from 

Gloria Way from 

Gowing Road from 

Grace Drive from 

Grand Avenue from 

Grant Street from 

Great Neck Drive from 

Grove Avenue from 

Grove Street from 

Gunderson Road from 



Main Street 

Nichols Street to Nichols Street 

Molloy Road 

State Street 

Massachusetts Avenue 

to beyond Harvard Avenue 

Glen Road to Jacobs Street 

Faulkner Ave northeasterly to dead end 

Glen Road to Garden Avenue 

Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 

Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 

Nichols Street 

Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 
Burlington Avenue 

Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 
North Reading Line 
Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
High Street 

Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Salem Street 

Park Street to Lucaya Circle 



299 
328 
952 
648 

790 
946 
125 
714 
740 
073 
550 
587 
792 
627 
680 
714 
100 
975 
739 
070 
086 



1951 
2000 
1971 
1971 
1979 

1946 
1958 
1971 
1933 

1950 
1944 
1999 
1938 
1894 
1967 
1996 
1989 
1977 
1970 
1996 
1971 
1894 
1989 
1978 
1966 
1979 



Glen Road to Agostino Drive 549 1979 

Towpath Road 380 1994 

Ring Avenue 62 7 1989 

Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 6,870 1894 

Glen Road to Lawrence Street 1,304 1952 

Suncrest Avenue 365 1959 

Broad Street 770 1989 

Park Street to Marcus Road 941 1956 

Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 2,514 1966 

Corey Avenue 815 1952 

Federal Street 780 1943 

Woburn Street 536 1989 

Main Street to Lake Street 4,147 1910 

Reading Line 120 1957 

Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 1,506 1959 



1953 



1945 



1976 



1966 



Hamlin Lane 
Hanover Street 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
Heather Drive 
Henry L. Drive 



from Lawrence Street 540 1962 

from Atlantic Avenue 574 1988 

from Woodland Road 83 8 1969 

from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 428 1951 

from Main Street to Glen Road 600 1895 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 1,312 1971 

from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 806 1945 

from Main Street to River Street 430 1951 

from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 3,270 1951 

from Woburn Street 230 1956 

from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 1,286 1979 

from Woburn Street 651 1993 



1953 1959 



•181- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



riiyn ocireeu 


f rom 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


i , b b 


X y4 




Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


Z , Z J U 


X y 14 




riixiuop Koau 


f rom 


Suncrest Avenue 


J 64 


X y b y 




Hobson Avenue 


f rom 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


T C £Z ri 

1 , b U 


X y 4 b 


X y b X 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3 , 051 


1894 


1972 


Houghton Road 


from 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1, 702 


1985 




Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4 , 4 J U 


X y / 4 




jaquicn Koau 


f rom 


Shawsheen Avenue 


T "3 

X , J y 


-I Q O Q 

X y -5 


X y 4 y 


Jere Road 


f rom 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


X , z 4 


1 Q ^ 

X y 




Jewel Drive 


f rom 


Eames Street 


X , J U J 


1 Q CI 

X y D 




uones Avenue 


f rom 


vjien Koaa 


/ X / 


T OA r\ 

X y 4 u 




UOnspm KOaQ. 


f rom 


Anaover ocreec 


"3 Q n n 
J , u u 


1 Q Q "3 

X y y J 




Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 




jxaj m way 


f rom 


woDurn oureeu. 


A c: c 
^ D D 


1 Q B Q 

X y y 




r^exxey Koau 


f rom 


L.nanaier Koaa 


y Z J 


1 Q c 7 
X y D / 




iN.enaaj._L oureeL 


f rom 


Aiaricn KoaQ uo niancnara Koau 


1 A n 
1 , *t z u 


1 Q A 

X y 4 D 




ivenwooa Avenue 


f rom 


woDuxn ou . CO DeyonQ ungiewooa ur . 


1 T 9 
1 , /ZD 


1 Q 7 n 
X y / u 


X y / X 


rvici na.n Avenue 


f rom 


jjowex X ouxeec co DeyonQ wapxes Koaa 


<; Q "5 
D y J 


1 Q 1^ B 

X y D 




T 1 m a >""n w" C V" a a ^ 

j\i xiTia.irriOC)\. oczreec 


f rom 


TaT A o t~ C ^ A A +~ t~ f~\ \~\^ \ r/~\ n o >" /— » 3 T5 ^ 3 /H 

rvesc ocxeet- co Deyonu. rioryaii KOd-u. 


1 fl A n 


1 R Q A 
J- -/ rt 




\C T n /~T O ^ v o A ^ 

ivx iiy o L X c e L 


f rom 


oxeii rcudu nj oxvjciLi ouxeeu 


9 Ann 

Z , T u u 


1 Q A n 


X -? *i J 


IN-Xny oLxeeu ilxl . 


f rom 


oxen Koao. 


A fi 7 


T Q 7 Q 




iS.XiK ocireec 


f rom 


riaxn ot-ireeu 


"7 c: 


X y D X 




Xid-Kc ouxeeu 


t rom 


r'laxn ouxeet- co onawsneen /wenue 


B c; 
J , D J 


1 B Q A 
X _7 




Liang ocreec 


f rom 


DanciOxL. ux ee u 


A n Q 

*t U J7 


X y D z 




XiaUxcx /wenue 


f rom 


jraxKci ouxeec uo rioxxoy Koau. 


A Q 
DDI? 


1 Q n 




Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


"7 B 
/ Z 


1 Q c; 
X y D D 




j-iawrence oureeu 


f rom 


(jien Koaa co onaay iiane urive 


A m 7 


1 Q 1=; S 
X y D D 




Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


7 B "3 
J J 


1 Q c; Q 
X y D y 




i-jexinguon oureeu 


f rom 


v^unningnam oureeu co riornings lac ur . 


7 1 A 
/ X H 


1 Q 7 A 




Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




XiXnQo. KOa.a 


f rom 


rixyn ouxeeu uo jjeyona r'xnerxu.ye KUdu. 


1 7 n 


T Q R n 
J. y D \J 




XiXOyQ KOo-Q 


f rom 


riaxn ouxeeu 


1 n n 

X , U D U 


X -7 J X 




XiOCKWOOQ KOaQ 


f rom 


Da X X ar a V a xe oureeu 


Q77 


1 Q 7 

J- y D 1 




Longvxew Road 


f rom 


Niaaiesex ^vvenue 


^ n 
D u 


1 Q q 
A.y D y 




j-jorin jjnve 


f rom 


owain KoaQ 


^ n 

D U 


1 QQ9 

X 17 ^ Z 




Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


D X u 


1 Q "3 
X J? D J 




LiOwexi iDureeu 


f rom 


riam oLreeu co Keaaing jjine 


in 1^9 

X U / J. D Z 


1 R Q A 
X J? *± 


1 Q7R 


LiOWcll bu . FarK 


from 


Lowell Street 


B n 
D u 


1 Q n R 

X -? u 


1 QR7 
X ^ J / 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


Z , *i D J 


1 Q 7 Q 

X y / -7 




Mackey Road 


from 


reaerax bureec 


9 R n 

Z D U 


1 QA 
X -7*± J 




Magazine Road 


from 


wisser isureeu 


7 9 
.3 z u 


1 Q7 

X -7 / J 




M 2 ^ ^ "7 T n O C ^ >" A A ^ 

ridy cx ^ 1 lie oULtrtrU 


f rom 


Idp-Llli >\vtrllLic 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2 , 806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2 , 315 


1958 




Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn St . to beyond Gunderson Road 


1 , 525 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond 












Clifton Street 


1, 876 


1945 




Marion Street 


from 


Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 


1995 




Marion Street 


from 


Marion St . southeasterly to Marion St 


. 1, 133 


2000 




Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1, 392 


1951 




Massachusetts Ave 


. from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 





-182- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



McDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2 , 621 


1944 


Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 


Meadow Lane 


from 


Meadow Lane thru cul-de-sac 


115 


1997 


Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 


Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12 , 140 


1894 


Miles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 


Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 










Wedgewood Avenue 


1, 528 


1967 


Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 


Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


Morse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 


Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,298 


1908 


Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1, 566 


1946 


Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1, 057 


1971 


Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3 , 801 


1894 


Nickerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


1947 


Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 


North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 


N. Washington Ave 


from 


Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 


Nottingham Drive 


from 


Stonehedge Drive thru cul-de-sac 


480 


1997 


Nunn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 


Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 


Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 


Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 


Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 


Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 


Oxbow Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


1, 751 


1994 


Palmer Way 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,437 


1989 


Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 


4 , 180 


1895 


Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2 , 000 


1919 


Patches Pond Lane 


from 


Chestnut Street to a dead end 


1, 185 


1990 


Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Phillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Ave. to beyond Baker Street 


1, 519 


1946 


Pilcher Drive 


from 


the end of Gearty Street 


410 


198 9 


Pilling Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 


Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Pineridge Road 


from 


North St. to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1, 364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Cir. 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Presidential Dr. thru cul-de-sac 


768 


1998 


Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 


Quail Run 


from 


Woburn Street 


500 


1992 



-183- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE{S) ACCEPTED 



Radcliff Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 


Railroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 


Reading Avenue 


from 


Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 


Reading Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Ave northwesterly to dead-end 160 


1997 


Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


64 5 


1970 


Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Ave . to beyond Harold Ave . 


1,090 


1971 


Research Drive 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


1,817 


1989 


Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 


Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 


River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 


453 


1962 


Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1,861 


1967 


Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


o r\ ri 
Z U U 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 


Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


J , J 4 J 


1958 


Royal Street 


from 


baiem btreet 


1,043 


1951 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond 










Ballardvale Street 


8,895 


1894 


Salem Street 


from 


North Reading Line to beyond 










Woburn Street 


6,475 


1894 


Saraf ina ' s Way 


from 


Hopkins St. thru cul-de-sac 


450 


1995 


Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


School Street 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 


1, 139 


1915 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Serenoa Lane 


from 


Woburn St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


600 


1999 


Sewell Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 


2, 904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richmond Street to 










Billerica Line 


11, 845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 


Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1, 021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


Silver Lake Ave. 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


Somerset Place 


from 


Mystic Avenue easterly thru cul-de-sac 878 


2000 


Sparhawk Drive 


from 


Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 


Sprucewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from 


Belmont Ave. to Fairview Ave. 


315 


1933 


Stonehedge Drive 


from 


Castle Dr. northerly thru cul-de-sac 


1,400 


1997 


Strout Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street 


908 


1955 


Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1, 246 


1954 


Swain Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2 ,290 


1922 


Taft Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1, 986 


1938 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1346 


Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to a dead end 


463 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


914 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to Butters Row 


886 


1996 


Tracy Circle 


from 


Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 



-184- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Valyn Lane 


from 


Salem Street 


608 


1989 


Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from 


No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


1, 105 


1954 


Wakefield Avenue 


from 


Buckingham St. easterly to dead end 


355 


1999 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1, 650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Wedgewood Ave. southeast thru cul-de- 


-sac 75 


1997 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8, 372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5, 290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1, 146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23, 122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1, 174 


1969 



-185- 




* * For Your Information * * 



Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 



Department Phone Directory 

Telephone Number 

694-2029 



(Mis sing/ Adopt ion) 
Arts Center 
Assessor 

Board of Selectmen Office 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Department 
Collector of Taxes 
Credit Union 

Department of Public Works 
Elderly Services 
Engineer 

Financial Director 
Fire Department 

Fire Prevention 
Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/ Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 



Public Buildings Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veteran's Agent 
Water Department 
Water Pumping Station 



658-5071 
658-7845 



(Complaints) 



657- 
658- 

ess- 
ess- 

658- 
658- 
658- 
658- 
657- 
658- 
658- 
658- 

9- 
694- 
658- 
658- 
658- 
657- 
658- 
658- 
658- 
658- 

9- 
657- 
658- 
658- 
694- 
658- 
658- 
694- 
658- 
658- 
694- 
658- 
658- 



3887 

3675 

3311 

4531 

3901 

3531 

5394 

4481 

7595 

4499 

3531 

3346 

1-1 

2006 

4298 

8531 

2967 

4625 

4298 

8238 

3223 

5071 

1-1 



(Business Phone) 
(EMERGENCY) 



(TDD) 



(EMERGENCY) 



8368 (TDD) 
3017 
4270 
6000 
2030 
3311 
1417 
3531 
2809 
2040 
3116 
4711 



(TDD) 



Eagle Graphics Inc. 

30 Lancaster Street 
Boston, MA 02114 



printed on recycled paper 



WILMINGTON MEVORIAL LIBRARY 



3 2136 00180 2721 



A special "thank you" to all those who contributed 
photographs for the enhancement of our Annual Report. 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



I 



''A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man 
contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral/' 



Antoine DeSaint-Exupery